Publication statistics

Pub. period:2000-2012
Pub. count:36
Number of co-authors:64



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

James A. Landay:16
Karen P. Tang:5
Guang Xiang:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Jason I. Hong's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

James A. Landay:91
Anind K. Dey:71
W. Keith Edwards:62
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Emotional Design: How to make products people will love
92% booked. Starts in 3 days
go to course
UI Design Patterns for Successful Software
84% booked. Starts in 11 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Jason I. Hong

Picture of Jason I. Hong.
Update pic
Personal Homepage:
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~jasonh/

 

Publications by Jason I. Hong (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
Edit | Del

Lin, Jialiu, Sadeh, Norman, Amini, Shahriyar, Lindqvist, Janne, Hong, Jason I. and Zhang, Joy (2012): Expectation and purpose: understanding users' mental models of mobile app privacy through crowdsourcing. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 501-510. Available online

Smartphone security research has produced many useful tools to analyze the privacy-related behaviors of mobile apps. However, these automated tools cannot assess people's perceptions of whether a given action is legitimate, or how that action makes them feel with respect to privacy. For example, automated tools might detect that a blackjack game and a map app both use one's location information, but people would likely view the map's use of that data as more legitimate than the game. Our work introduces a new model for privacy, namely privacy as expectations. We report on the results of using crowdsourcing to capture users' expectations of what sensitive resources mobile apps use. We also report on a new privacy summary interface that prioritizes and highlights places where mobile apps break people's expectations. We conclude with a discussion of implications for employing crowdsourcing as a privacy evaluation technique.

© All rights reserved Lin et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
Edit | Del

Chau, Duen Horng, Kittur, Aniket, Hong, Jason I. and Faloutsos, Christos (2011): Apolo: making sense of large network data by combining rich user interaction and machine learning. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 167-176. Available online

Extracting useful knowledge from large network datasets has become a fundamental challenge in many domains, from scientific literature to social networks and the web. We introduce Apolo, a system that uses a mixed-initiative approach -- combining visualization, rich user interaction and machine learning -- to guide the user to incrementally and interactively explore large network data and make sense of it. Apolo engages the user in bottom-up sensemaking to gradually build up an understanding over time by starting small, rather than starting big and drilling down. Apolo also helps users find relevant information by specifying exemplars, and then using a machine learning method called Belief Propagation to infer which other nodes may be of interest. We evaluated Apolo with twelve participants in a between-subjects study, with the task being to find relevant new papers to update an existing survey paper. Using expert judges, participants using Apolo found significantly more relevant papers. Subjective feedback of Apolo was also very positive.

© All rights reserved Chau et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Liu, Gang, Xiang, Guang, Pendleton, Bryan A., Hong, Jason I. and Liu, Wenyin (2011): Smartening the crowds: computational techniques for improving human verification to fight phishing scams. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2011. p. 8. Available online

Phishing is an ongoing kind of semantic attack that tricks victims into inadvertently sharing sensitive information. In this paper, we explore novel techniques for combating the phishing problem using computational techniques to improve human effort. Using tasks posted to the Amazon Mechanical Turk human effort market, we measure the accuracy of minimally trained humans in identifying potential phish, and consider methods for best taking advantage of individual contributions. Furthermore, we present our experiments using clustering techniques and vote weighting to improve the results of human effort in fighting phishing. We found that these techniques could increase coverage over and were significantly faster than existing blacklists used today.

© All rights reserved Liu et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Wiese, Jason, Kelley, Patrick Gage, Cranor, Lorrie Faith, Dabbish, Laura, Hong, Jason I. and Zimmerman, John (2011): Are you close with me? are you nearby?: investigating social groups, closeness, and willingness to share. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 197-206. Available online

As ubiquitous computing becomes increasingly mobile and social, personal information sharing will likely increase in frequency, the variety of friends to share with, and range of information that can be shared. Past work has identified that whom you share with is important for choosing whether or not to share, but little work has explored which features of interpersonal relationships influence sharing. We present the results of a study of 42 participants, who self-report aspects of their relationships with 70 of their friends, including frequency of collocation and communication, closeness, and social group. Participants rated their willingness to share in 21 different scenarios based on information a UbiComp system could provide. Our findings show that (a) self-reported closeness is the strongest indicator of willingness to share, (b) individuals are more likely to share in scenarios with common information (e.g. we are within one mile of each other) than other kinds of scenarios (e.g. my location wherever I am), and (c) frequency of communication predicts both closeness and willingness to share better than frequency of collocation.

© All rights reserved Wiese et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Tang, Karen P., Hong, Jason I. and Siewiorek, Daniel P. (2011): Understanding how visual representations of location feeds affect end-user privacy concerns. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 207-216. Available online

While past work has looked extensively at how to design privacy configuration UIs for sharing current location, there has not yet been work done to examine how visual representations of historical locations can influence end-user privacy. We present results for a study examining three visualization types (text-, map-, and time-based) for social sharing of past locations. Our results reveal that there are important design implications for location sharing applications, as certain visual elements led to more privacy concerns and inaccurate perceptions of privacy control.

© All rights reserved Tang et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
Edit | Del

Lin, Jialiu, Xiang, Guang, Hong, Jason I. and Sadeh, Norman (2010): Modeling people's place naming preferences in location sharing. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 75-84. Available online

Most location sharing applications display people's locations on a map. However, people use a rich variety of terms to refer to their locations, such as "home," "Starbucks," or "the bus stop near my house." Our long-term goal is to create a system that can automatically generate appropriate place names based on real-time context and user preferences. As a first step, we analyze data from a two-week study involving 26 participants in two different cities, focusing on how people refer to places in location sharing. We derive a taxonomy of different place naming methods, and show that factors such as a person's perceived familiarity with a place and the entropy of that place (i.e. the variety of people who visit it) strongly influence the way people refer to it when interacting with others. We also present a machine learning model for predicting how people name places. Using our data, this model is able to predict the place naming method people choose with an average accuracy higher than 85%.

© All rights reserved Lin et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Tang, Karen P., Lin, Jialiu, Hong, Jason I., Siewiorek, Daniel P. and Sadeh, Norman (2010): Rethinking location sharing: exploring the implications of social-driven vs. purpose-driven location sharing. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 85-94. Available online

The popularity of micro-blogging has made general-purpose information sharing a pervasive phenomenon. This trend is now impacting location sharing applications (LSAs) such that users are sharing their location data with a much wider and more diverse audience. In this paper, we describe this as social-driven sharing, distinguishing it from past examples of what we refer to as purpose-driven location sharing. We explore the differences between these two types of sharing by conducting a comparative two-week study with nine participants. We found significant differences in terms of users' decisions about what location information to share, their privacy concerns, and how privacy-preserving their disclosures were. Based on these results, we provide design implications for future LSAs.

© All rights reserved Tang et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
Edit | Del

Won, Sungjoon Steve, Jin, Jing and Hong, Jason I. (2009): Contextual web history: using visual and contextual cues to improve web browser history. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1457-1466. Available online

While most modern web browsers offer history functionality, few people use it to revisit previously viewed web pages. In this paper, we present the design and evaluation of Contextual Web History (CWH), a novel browser history implementation which improves the visibility of the history feature and helps people find previously visited web pages. We present the results of a formative user study to understand what factors helped people in finding past web pages. From this, we developed CWH to be more visible to users, and supported search, browsing, thumbnails, and metadata. Combined, these relatively simple features outperformed Mozilla Firefox 3's built-in browser history function, and greatly reduced the time and effort required to find and revisit a web page.

© All rights reserved Won et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Chau, Duen Horng, Kittur, Aniket, Faloutsos, Christos and Hong, Jason I. (2009): SHIFTR: a user-directed, link-based system for ad hoc sensemaking of large heterogeneous data collections. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3535-3536. Available online

We present a novel method and prototype system to help users make sense of and reorganize large amounts of heterogeneous information. Our work is grounded in theories of categorization from cognitive psychology and is designed for ad hoc sensemaking; that is, supporting people's shifting goals and flexible mental representations of concepts. Shiftr adapts a carefully chosen Belief Propagation algorithm from large-scale graph mining to efficiently assist users in interactively clustering information of arbitrary types. The system functions effectively with few human-labeled examples, and supports the use of both positive and negative examples. We demonstrate Shiftr's utility through sensemaking scenarios, one of which uses the DBLP bibliography dataset, which contains more than 1.7 million author-paper relationships.

© All rights reserved Chau et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Xiang, Guang and Hong, Jason I. (2009): A hybrid phish detection approach by identity discovery and keywords retrieval. In: Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2009. pp. 571-580. Available online

Phishing is a significant security threat to the Internet, which causes tremendous economic loss every year. In this paper, we proposed a novel hybrid phish detection method based on information extraction (IE) and information retrieval (IR) techniques. The identity-based component of our method detects phishing webpages by directly discovering the inconsistency between their identity and the identity they are imitating. The keywords-retrieval component utilizes IR algorithms exploiting the power of search engines to identify phish. Our method requires no training data, no prior knowledge of phishing signatures and specific implementations, and thus is able to adapt quickly to constantly appearing new phishing patterns. Comprehensive experiments over a diverse spectrum of data sources with 11449 pages show that both components have a low false positive rate and the stacked approach achieves a true positive rate of 90.06% with a false positive rate of 1.95%.

© All rights reserved Xiang and Hong and/or ACM Press

2007
 
Edit | Del

Wong, Jeffrey and Hong, Jason I. (2007): Making mashups with marmite: towards end-user programming for the web. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1435-1444. Available online

There is a tremendous amount of web content available today, but it is not always in a form that supports end-users' needs. In many cases, all of the data and services needed to accomplish a goal already exist, but are not in a form amenable to an end-user. To address this problem, we have developed an end-user programming tool called Marmite, which lets end-users create so-called mashups that re-purpose and combine existing web content and services. In this paper, we present the design, implementation, and evaluation of Marmite. An informal user study found that programmers and some spreadsheet users had little difficulty using the system.

© All rights reserved Wong and Hong and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Zhang, Yue, Hong, Jason I. and Cranor, Lorrie F. (2007): Cantina: a content-based approach to detecting phishing web sites. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2007. pp. 639-648. Available online

Phishing is a significant problem involving fraudulent email and web sites that trick unsuspecting users into revealing private information. In this paper, we present the design, implementation, and evaluation of CANTINA, a novel, content-based approach to detecting phishing web sites, based on the TF-IDF information retrieval algorithm. We also discuss the design and evaluation of several heuristics we developed to reduce false positives. Our experiments show that CANTINA is good at detecting phishing sites, correctly labeling approximately 95% of phishing sites.

© All rights reserved Zhang et al. and/or International World Wide Web Conference Committee

 
Edit | Del

Tang, Karen P., Hong, Jason I., Smith, Ian E., Ha, Annie and Satpathy, Lalatendu (2007): Memory karaoke: using a location-aware mobile reminiscence tool to support aging in place. In: Cheok, Adrian David and Chittaro, Luca (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2007 September 9-12, 2007, Singapore. pp. 305-312. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Hsieh, Gary, Tang, Karen P., Low, Wai Yong and Hong, Jason I. (2007): Field Deployment of IMBuddy : A Study of Privacy Control and Feedback Mechanisms for Contextual IM. In: Krumm, John, Abowd, Gregory D., Seneviratne, Aruna and Strang, Thomas (eds.) UbiComp 2007 Ubiquitous Computing - 9th International Conference September 16-19, 2007, Innsbruck, Austria. pp. 91-108. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Li, Yang, Hong, Jason I. and Landay, James A. (2007): Design Challenges and Principles for Wizard of Oz Testing of Location-Enhanced Applications. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 6 (2) pp. 70-75. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Hong, Jason I., Satyanarayanan, Mahadev and Cybenko, George (2007): Guest Editors' Introduction: Security & Privacy. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 6 (4) pp. 15-17. Available online

2006
 
Edit | Del

Tang, Karen P., Keyani, Pedram, Fogarty, James and Hong, Jason I. (2006): Putting people in their place: an anonymous and privacy-sensitive approach to collecting sensed data in location-based applications. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 93-102. Available online

The emergence of location-based computing promises new and compelling applications, but raises very real privacy risks. Existing approaches to privacy generally treat people as the entity of interest, often using a fidelity tradeoff to manage the costs and benefits of revealing a person's location. However, these approaches cannot be applied in some applications, as a reduction in precision can render location information useless. This is true of a category of applications that use location data collected from multiple people to infer such information as whether there is a traffic jam on a bridge, whether there are seats available in a nearby coffee shop, when the next bus will arrive, or if a particular conference room is currently empty. We present hitchhiking, a new approach that treats locations as the primary entity of interest. Hitchhiking removes the fidelity tradeoff by preserving the anonymity of reports without reducing the precision of location disclosures. We can therefore support the full functionality of an interesting class of location-based applications without introducing the privacy concerns that would otherwise arise.

© All rights reserved Tang et al. and/or ACM Press

2005
 
Edit | Del

Hong, Jason I. (2005): Minimizing Security Risks in Ubicomp Systems. In IEEE Computer, 38 (12) pp. 118-119.

2004
 
Edit | Del

Jiang, Xiaodong, Hong, Jason I., Takayama, Leila A. and Landay, James A. (2004): Ubiquitous computing for firefighters: field studies and prototypes of large displays for incident command. In: Dykstra-Erickson, Elizabeth and Tscheligi, Manfred (eds.) Proceedings of ACM CHI 2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 679-686. Available online

In this paper, we demonstrate how field studies, interviews, and low-fidelity prototypes can be used to inform the design of ubiquitous computing systems for firefighters. We describe the artifacts and processes used by firefighters to assess, plan, and communicate during emergency situations, showing how accountability affects these decisions, how their current Incident Command System supports these tasks, and some drawbacks of existing solutions. These factors informed the design of a large electronic display for supporting the incident commander, the person who coordinates the overall response strategy in an emergency. Although our focus was on firefighters, our results are applicable for other aspects of emergency response as well, due to common procedures and training.

© All rights reserved Jiang et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Li, Yang, Hong, Jason I. and Landay, James A. (2004): Topiary: a tool for prototyping location-enhanced applications. In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2004. pp. 217-226. Available online

Location-enhanced applications use the location of people, places, and things to augment or streamline interaction. Location-enhanced applications are just starting to emerge in several different domains, and many people believe that this type of application will experience tremendous growth in the near future. However, it currently requires a high level of technical expertise to build location-enhanced applications, making it hard to iterate on designs. To address this problem we introduce Topiary, a tool for rapidly prototyping location-enhanced applications. Topiary lets designers create a map that models the location of people, places, and things; use this active map to demonstrate scenarios depicting location contexts; use these scenarios in creating storyboards that describe interaction sequences; and then run these storyboards on mobile devices, with a wizard updating the location of people and things on a separate device. We performed an informal evaluation with seven researchers and interface designers and found that they reacted positively to the concept.

© All rights reserved Li et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Hong, Jason I., Ng, Jennifer D., Lederer, Scott and Landay, James A. (2004): Privacy risk models for designing privacy-sensitive ubiquitous computing systems. In: Proceedings of DIS04: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2004. pp. 91-100. Available online

Privacy is a difficult design issue that is becoming increasingly important as we push into ubiquitous computing environments. While there is a fair amount of theoretical work on designing for privacy, there are few practical methods for helping designers create applications that provide end-users with a reasonable level of privacy protection that is commensurate with the domain, with the community of users, and with the risks and benefits to all stakeholders in the intended system. Towards this end, we propose privacy risk models as a general method for refining privacy from an abstract concept into concrete issues for specific applications and prioritizing those issues. In this paper, we introduce a privacy risk model we have developed specifically for ubiquitous computing, and outline two case studies describing our use of this privacy risk model in the design of two ubiquitous computing applications.

© All rights reserved Hong et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Chung, Eric S., Hong, Jason I., Lin, James, Prabaker, Madhu K., Landay, James A. and Liu, Alan L. (2004): Development and evaluation of emerging design patterns for ubiquitous computing. In: Proceedings of DIS04: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2004. pp. 233-242. Available online

Design patterns are a format for capturing and sharing design knowledge. In this paper, we look at a new domain for design patterns, namely ubiquitous computing. The overall goal of this work is to aid practice by speeding up the diffusion of new interaction techniques and evaluation results from researchers, presenting the information in a form more usable to practicing designers. Towards this end, we have developed an initial and emerging pattern language for ubiquitous computing, consisting of 45 pre-patterns describing application genres, physical-virtual spaces, interaction and systems techniques for managing privacy, and techniques for fluid interactions. We evaluated the effectiveness of our pre-patterns with 16 pairs of designers in helping them design location-enhanced applications. We observed that our pre-patterns helped new and experienced designers unfamiliar with ubiquitous computing in generating and communicating ideas, and in avoiding design problems early in the design process.

© All rights reserved Chung et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Lederer, Scott, Hong, Jason I., Dey, Anind K. and Landay, James A. (2004): Personal privacy through understanding and action: five pitfalls for designers. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 8 (6) pp. 440-454. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Jiang, Xiaodong, Chen, Nicholas Y., Hong, Jason I., Wang, Kevin, Takayama, Leila and Landay, James A. (2004): Siren: Context-aware Computing for Firefighting. In: Ferscha, Alois and Mattern, Friedemann (eds.) PERVASIVE 2004 - Pervasive Computing, Second International Conference April 21-23, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 87-105. Available online

2003
 
Edit | Del

Newman, Mark W., Lin, James J. W., Hong, Jason I. and Landay, James A. (2003): DENIM: An Informal Web Site Design Tool Inspired by Observations of Practice. In Human-Computer Interaction, 18 (3) pp. 259-324.

Through a study of Web site design practice, we observed that designers employ multiple representations of Web sites as they progress through the design process and that these representations allow them to focus on different aspects of the design. In particular, we observed that Web site designers focus their design efforts at 3 different levels of granularity-site map, storyboard, and individual page-and that designers sketch at all levels during the early stages of design. Sketching on paper is especially important during the early phases of a project, when designers wish to explore many design possibilities quickly without focusing on low-level details. Existing Web design tools do not support such exploration tasks well, nor do they adequately integrate multiple site representations. Informed by these observations we developed DENIM: an informal Web site design tool that supports early phase information and navigation design of Web sites. It supports sketching input, allows design at different levels of granularity, and unifies the levels through zooming. Designers are able to interact with their sketched designs as if in a Web browser, thus allowing rapid creation and exploration of interactive prototypes. Based on an evaluation with professional designers as well as usage feedback from users who have downloaded DENIM from the Internet, we have made numerous improvements to the system and have received many positive reactions from designers who would like to use a system like DENIM in their work.

© All rights reserved Newman et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 Cited in the following chapter:

End-User Development: [/encyclopedia/end-user_development.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

End-User Development: [/encyclopedia/end-user_development.html]


 
 
Edit | Del

Heer, Jeffrey, Newberger, Alan, Beckmann, Chris and Hong, Jason I. (2003): liquid: Context-Aware Distributed Queries. In: Dey, Anind K., Schmidt, Albrecht and McCarthy, Joseph F. (eds.) UbiComp 2003 Ubiquitous Computing - 5th International Conference October 12-15, 2003, Seattle, WA, USA. pp. 140-148. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Schilit, Bill N., Hong, Jason I. and Gruteser, Marco (2003): Wireless Location Privacy Protection. In IEEE Computer, 36 (12) pp. 135-137. Available online

2002
 
Edit | Del

van Duyne, Douglas K., Landay, James A. and Hong, Jason I. (2002): The Design of Sites: Patterns, Principles, and Processes for Crafting a Customer-Centered Web Experience. Addison-Wesley Publishing

 Cited in the following chapter:

Interaction Design Patterns: [/encyclopedia/interaction_design_patterns.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Interaction Design Patterns: [/encyclopedia/interaction_design_patterns.html]


 
 
Edit | Del

Newman, Mark W., Sedivy, Jana Z., Neuwirth, Christine, Edwards, W. Keith, Hong, Jason I., Izadi, Shahram, Marcelo, Karen, Smith, Trevor F., Sedivy, Jana and Newman, Mark (2002): Designing for serendipity: supporting end-user configuration of ubiquitous computing environments. In: Proceedings of DIS02: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2002. pp. 147-156. Available online

The future world of ubiquitous computing is one in which we will be surrounded by an ever-richer set of networked devices and services. In such a world, we cannot expect to have available to us specific applications that allow us to accomplish every conceivable combination of devices that we might wish. Instead, we believe that many of our interactions will be through highly generic tools that allow enduser discovery, configuration, interconnection, and control of the devices around us. This paper presents a design study of such an environment, intended to support serendipitous, opportunistic use of discovered network resources. We present an examination of a generic browser-style application built on top of an infrastructure developed to support arbitrary recombination of devices and services, as well as a number of challenges we believe to be inherent in such settings.

© All rights reserved Newman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Jiang, Xiaodong, Hong, Jason I. and Landay, James A. (2002): Approximate Information Flows: Socially-Based Modeling of Privacy in Ubiquitous Computing. In: Borriello, Gaetano and Holmquist, Lars Erik (eds.) UbiComp 2002 Ubiquitous Computing - 4th International Conference September 29 - October 1, 2002, Gteborg, Sweden. pp. 176-193. Available online

2001
 
Edit | Del

Hong, Jason I. and Landay, James A. (2001): An Infrastructure Approach to Context-Aware Computing. In Human-Computer Interaction, 16 (2) pp. 287-303.

The Context Toolkit (Dey, Abowd, and Salber, 2001 [this special issue]) is only one of many possible architectures for supporting context-aware applications. In this essay, we look at the tradeoffs involved with a service infrastructure approach to context-aware computing. We describe the advantages that a service infrastructure for context awareness has over other approaches, outline some of the core technical challenges that must be addressed before such an infrastructure can be built, and point out promising research directions for overcoming these challenges.

© All rights reserved Hong and Landay and/or Taylor and Francis

 
Edit | Del

Hong, Jason I., Heer, Jeffrey, Waterson, Sarah and Landay, James A. (2001): WebQuilt: A proxy-based approach to remote web usability testing. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 19 (3) pp. 263-285. Available online

WebQuilt is a web logging and visualization system that helps web design teams run usability tests (both local and remote) and analyze the collected data. Logging is done through a proxy, overcoming many of the problems with server-side and client-side logging. Captured usage traces can be aggregated and visualized in a zooming interface that shows the web pages people viewed. The visualization also shows the most common paths taken through the web site for a given task, as well as the optimal path for that task, as designated by the designer. This paper discusses the architecture of WebQuilt and describes how it can be extended for new kinds of analyses and visualizations.

© All rights reserved Hong et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Hong, Jason I. and Landay, James A. (2001): A Context/Communication Information Agent. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 5 (1) pp. 78-81. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Hong, Jason I. and Landay, James A. (2001): WebQuilt: a framework for capturing and visualizing the web experience. In: Proceedings of the 2001 International Conference on the World Wide Web 2001. pp. 717-724. Available online

2000
 
Edit | Del

Lin, James, Newman, Mark W., Hong, Jason I. and Landay, James A. (2000): DENIM: Finding a Tighter Fit between Tools and Practice for Web Site Design. In: Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands. pp. 510-517. Available online

Through a study of web site design practice, we observed that web site designers design sites at different levels of refinement -- site map, storyboard, and individual page -- and that designers sketch at all levels during the early stages of design. However, existing web design tools do not support these tasks very well. Informed by these observations, we created DENIM, a system that helps web site designers in the early stages of design. DENIM supports sketching input, allows design at different refinement levels, and unifies the levels through zooming. We performed an informal evaluation with seven professional designers and found that they reacted positively to the concept and were interested in using such a system in their work.

© All rights reserved Lin et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Formal Methods: [/encyclopedia/formal_methods.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Formal Methods: [/encyclopedia/formal_methods.html]


 
 
Edit | Del

Hong, Jason I. and Landay, James A. (2000): SATIN: A Toolkit for Informal Ink-Based Applications. In: Ackerman, Mark S. and Edwards, Keith (eds.) Proceedings of the 13th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 2000, San Diego, California, United States. pp. 63-72. Available online

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/jason_i__hong.html