Publication statistics

Pub. period:0000-2012
Pub. count:20
Number of co-authors:39



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Norman Sadeh:6
Lorrie Cranor:5
Eran Toch:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Jason Hong's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

John Zimmerman:51
Lorrie Faith Crano..:44
Aniket Kittur:27
 
 
 
Jul 22

... in an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention, and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it.

-- Herbert Simon in "Computers, Communications and the Public Interest," 1971

 
 

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Jason Hong

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Publications by Jason Hong (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Zheng, Yu and Hong, Jason (2012): The preface of the 4th International Workshop on Location-Based Social Networks. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 894-896.

We briefly introduce the 4th international workshop on location-based social networks (LBSN 2012), describing its objective, importance, and results.

© All rights reserved Zheng and Hong and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Hayashi, Eiji, Hong, Jason and Christin, Nicolas (2011): Security through a different kind of obscurity: evaluating distortion in graphical authentication schemes. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2055-2064.

While a large body of research on image-based authentication has focused on memorability, comparatively less attention has been paid to the new security challenges these schemes may introduce. Because images can convey more information than text, image-based authentication may be more vulnerable to educated guess attacks than passwords. In this paper, we evaluate the resilience of a recognition-based graphical authentication scheme using distorted images against two types of educated guess attacks through two user studies. The first study, consisting of 30 participants, investigates whether distortion prevents educated guess attacks primarily based on information about individual users. The second study, using Amazon Mechanical Turk, investigates whether distortion mitigates the risk of educated guess attacks based on collective information about users. Our results show that authentication images without distortion are vulnerable to educated guess attacks, especially when information about the target is known, and that distortion makes authentication images more resilient against educated guess attacks.

© All rights reserved Hayashi et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Lindqvist, Janne, Cranshaw, Justin, Wiese, Jason, Hong, Jason and Zimmerman, John (2011): I'm the mayor of my house: examining why people use foursquare -- a social-driven location sharing application. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2409-2418.

There have been many location sharing systems developed over the past two decades, and only recently have they started to be adopted by consumers. In this paper, we present the results of three studies focusing on the foursquare check-in system. We conducted interviews and two surveys to understand, both qualitatively and quantitatively, how and why people use location sharing applications, as well as how they manage their privacy. We also document surprising uses of foursquare, and discuss implications for design of mobile social services.

© All rights reserved Lindqvist et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hayashi, Eiji and Hong, Jason (2011): A diary study of password usage in daily life. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2627-2630.

While past work has examined password usage on a specific computer, web site, or organization, there is little work examining overall password usage in daily life. Through a diary study, we examine all usage of passwords, and offer some new findings based on quantitative analyses regarding how often people log in, where they log in, and how frequently people use foreign computers. Our analysis also confirms or updates existing statistics about password usage patterns. We also discuss some implications for design as well as security education.

© All rights reserved Hayashi and Hong and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Cranshaw, Justin, Toch, Eran, Hong, Jason, Kittur, Aniket and Sadeh, Norman (2010): Bridging the gap between physical location and online social networks. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 119-128.

This paper examines the location traces of 489 users of a location sharing social network for relationships between the users' mobility patterns and structural properties of their underlying social network. We introduce a novel set of location-based features for analyzing the social context of a geographic region, including location entropy, which measures the diversity of unique visitors of a location. Using these features, we provide a model for predicting friendship between two users by analyzing their location trails. Our model achieves significant gains over simpler models based only on direct properties of the co-location histories, such as the number of co-locations. We also show a positive relationship between the entropy of the locations the user visits and the number of social ties that user has in the network. We discuss how the offline mobility of users can have implications for both researchers and designers of online social networks.

© All rights reserved Cranshaw et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Toch, Eran, Cranshaw, Justin, Drielsma, Paul Hankes, Tsai, Janice Y., Kelley, Patrick Gage, Springfield, James, Cranor, Lorrie, Hong, Jason and Sadeh, Norman (2010): Empirical models of privacy in location sharing. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 129-138.

The rapid adoption of location tracking and mobile social networking technologies raises significant privacy challenges. Today our understanding of people's location sharing privacy preferences remains very limited, including how these preferences are impacted by the type of location tracking device or the nature of the locations visited. To address this gap, we deployed Locaccino, a mobile location sharing system, in a four week long field study, where we examined the behavior of study participants (n=28) who shared their location with their acquaintances (n=373.) Our results show that users appear more comfortable sharing their presence at locations visited by a large and diverse set of people. Our study also indicates that people who visit a wider number of places tend to also be the subject of a greater number of requests for their locations. Over time these same people tend to also evolve more sophisticated privacy preferences, reflected by an increase in time- and location-based restrictions. We conclude by discussing the implications our findings.

© All rights reserved Toch et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Toch, Eran, Cranshaw, Justin, Hankes-Drielsma, Paul, Springfield, Jay, Kelley, Patrick Gage, Cranor, Lorrie, Hong, Jason and Sadeh, Norman (2010): Locaccino: a privacy-centric location sharing application. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 381-382.

Locaccino is a location sharing application designed to empower users to effectively control their privacy. It has been piloted by close to 2000 users and has been used by researchers as an experimental platform for conducting research on location-based social networks. Featured technologies include expressive privacy rule creation, detailed feedback mechanisms that help users understand their privacy, algorithms for analyzing privacy preferences, and clients for mobile computers and smartphone devices. In addition, variations of Locaccino are also being piloted as part of research on user-controllable policy learning, learning usable privacy personas and reconciling expressiveness and user burden. The purpose of this demo is to introduce participants to the features of Locaccino, so that they can try out the Locaccino smartphone and laptop applications on their own devices, locate their friends and colleagues, and set rich privacy policies for sharing their location.

© All rights reserved Toch et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Toch, Eran, Sadeh, Norman M. and Hong, Jason (2010): Generating default privacy policies for online social networks. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4243-4248.

Default privacy policies have a significant impact on the overall dynamics and success of online social networks, as users tend to keep their initial privacy policies. In this work-in-progress, we present a new method for suggesting privacy policies for new users by exploring knowledge of existing policies. The defaults generation process performs a collaborative analysis of the policies, finding personalized and representative suggestions. We show how the process can be extended to a wide range of domains, and present results based on 543 privacy policies obtained from a live location-based social network. Finally, we present a user interaction model that lets the user retain control over the default policies, allowing the user to make knowledgeable decisions regarding which default policy to take.

© All rights reserved Toch et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Tsai, Janice Y., Kelley, Patrick, Drielsma, Paul, Cranor, Lorrie Faith, Hong, Jason and Sadeh, Norman (2009): Who's viewed you?: the impact of feedback in a mobile location-sharing application. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 2003-2012.

Feedback is viewed as an essential element of ubiquitous computing systems in the HCI literature for helping people manage their privacy. However, the success of online social networks and existing commercial systems for mobile location sharing which do not incorporate feedback would seem to call the importance of feedback into question. We investigated this issue in the context of a mobile location sharing system. Specifically, we report on the findings of a field deployment of Locyoution, a mobile location sharing system. In our study of 56 users, one group was given feedback in the form of a history of location requests, and a second group was given no feedback at all. Our major contribution has been to show that feedback is an important contributing factor towards improving user comfort levels and allaying privacy concerns. Participants' privacy concerns were reduced after using the mobile location sharing system. Additionally, our study suggests that peer opinion and technical savviness contribute most to whether or not participants thought they would continue to use a mobile location technology.

© All rights reserved Tsai et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kumaraguru, Ponnurangam, Cranshaw, Justin, Acquisti, Alessandro, Cranor, Lorrie, Hong, Jason, Blair, Mary Ann and Pham, Theodore (2009): School of phish: a real-word evaluation of anti-phishing training. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2009. p. 3.

PhishGuru is an embedded training system that teaches users to avoid falling for phishing attacks by delivering a training message when the user clicks on the URL in a simulated phishing email. In previous lab and real-world experiments, we validated the effectiveness of this approach. Here, we extend our previous work with a 515-participant, real-world study in which we focus on long-term retention and the effect of two training messages. We also investigate demographic factors that influence training and general phishing susceptibility. Results of this study show that (1) users trained with PhishGuru retain knowledge even after 28 days; (2) adding a second training message to reinforce the original training decreases the likelihood of people giving information to phishing websites; and (3) training does not decrease users' willingness to click on links in legitimate messages. We found no significant difference between males and females in the tendency to fall for phishing emails both before and after the training. We found that participants in the 18-25 age group were consistently more vulnerable to phishing attacks on all days of the study than older participants. Finally, our exit survey results indicate that most participants enjoyed receiving training during their normal use of email.

© All rights reserved Kumaraguru et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hayashi, Eiji, Hong, Jason and Christin, Nicolas (2009): Educated guess on graphical authentication schemes: vulnerabilities and countermeasures. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2009. p. 25.

 
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Toch, Eran, Ravichandran, Ramprasad, Cranor, Lorrie, Drielsma, Paul, Hong, Jason, Kelley, Patrick, Sadeh, Norman and Tsai, Janice (2009): Analyzing use of privacy policy attributes in a location sharing application. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2009. p. 32.

 
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Tsai, Janice, Kelley, Patrick, Drielsma, Paul Hankes, Cranor, Lorrie, Hong, Jason and Sadeh, Norman (2009): Who's viewed you?: the impact of feedback in a mobile location-sharing application. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2009. p. 43.

2008
 
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Egelman, Serge, Cranor, Lorrie Faith and Hong, Jason (2008): You've been warned: an empirical study of the effectiveness of web browser phishing warnings. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1065-1074.

Many popular web browsers are now including active phishing warnings after previous research has shown that passive warnings are often ignored. In this laboratory study we examine the effectiveness of these warnings and examine if, how, and why they fail users. We simulated a spear phishing attack to expose users to browser warnings. We found that 97% of our sixty participants fell for at least one of the phishing messages that we sent them. However, we also found that when presented with the active warnings, 79% of participants heeded them, which was not the case for the passive warning that we tested -- where only one participant heeded the warnings. Using a model from the warning sciences we analyzed how users perceive warning messages and offer suggestions for creating more effective warning messages within the phishing context.

© All rights reserved Egelman et al. and/or ACM Press

2007
 
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Kumaraguru, Ponnurangam, Rhee, Yong, Acquisti, Alessandro, Cranor, Lorrie Faith, Hong, Jason and Nunge, Elizabeth (2007): Protecting people from phishing: the design and evaluation of an embedded training email system. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 905-914.

Phishing attacks, in which criminals lure Internet users to websites that impersonate legitimate sites, are occurring with increasing frequency and are causing considerable harm to victims. In this paper we describe the design and evaluation of an embedded training email system that teaches people about phishing during their normal use of email. We conducted lab experiments contrasting the effectiveness of standard security notices about phishing with two embedded training designs we developed. We found that embedded training works better than the current practice of sending security notices. We also derived sound design principles for embedded training systems.

© All rights reserved Kumaraguru et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kumaraguru, Ponnurangam, Rhee, Yong, Sheng, Steve, Hasan, Sharique, Acquisti, Alessandro, Cranor, Lorrie Faith and Hong, Jason (2007): Getting users to pay attention to anti-phishing education: evaluation of retention and transfer. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Anti-Phishing Working Groups eCrime Researchers Summit 2007. pp. 70-81.

Educational materials designed to teach users not to fall for phishing attacks are widely available but are often ignored by users. In this paper, we extend an embedded training methodology using learning science principles in which phishing education is made part of a primary task for users. The goal is to motivate users to pay attention to the training materials. In embedded training, users are sent simulated phishing attacks and trained after they fall for the attacks. Prior studies tested users immediately after training and demonstrated that embedded training improved users' ability to identify phishing emails and websites. In the present study, we tested users to determine how well they retained knowledge gained through embedded training and how well they transferred this knowledge to identify other types of phishing emails. We also compared the effectiveness of the same training materials delivered via embedded training and delivered as regular email messages. In our experiments, we found that: (a) users learn more effectively when the training materials are presented after users fall for the attack (embedded) than when the same training materials are sent by email (non-embedded); (b) users retain and transfer more knowledge after embedded training than after non-embedded training; and (c) users with higher Cognitive Reflection Test (CRT) scores are more likely than users with lower CRT scores to click on the links in the phishing emails from companies with which they have no account.

© All rights reserved Kumaraguru et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Sheng, Steve, Magnien, Bryant, Kumaraguru, Ponnurangam, Acquisti, Alessandro, Cranor, Lorrie Faith, Hong, Jason and Nunge, Elizabeth (2007): Anti-Phishing Phil: the design and evaluation of a game that teaches people not to fall for phish. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2007. pp. 88-99.

In this paper we describe the design and evaluation of Anti-Phishing Phil, an online game that teaches users good habits to help them avoid phishing attacks. We used learning science principles to design and iteratively refine the game. We evaluated the game through a user study: participants were tested on their ability to identify fraudulent web sites before and after spending 15 minutes engaged in one of three anti-phishing training activities (playing the game, reading an anti-phishing tutorial we created based on the game, or reading existing online training materials). We found that the participants who played the game were better able to identify fraudulent web sites compared to the participants in other conditions. We attribute these effects to both the content of the training messages presented in the game as well as the presentation of these materials in an interactive game format. Our results confirm that games can be an effective way of educating people about phishing and other security attacks.

© All rights reserved Sheng et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Iachello, Giovanni and Hong, Jason (2007): End-User Privacy in Human-Computer Interaction. In Foundations and Trends in Human-Computer Interaction, 1 (1) pp. 1-137.

The purpose of this article is twofold. First, we summarize research on the topic of privacy in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), outlining current approaches, results, and trends. Practitioners and researchers can draw upon this review when working on topics related to privacy in the context of HCI and CSCW. The second purpose is that of charting future research trends and of pointing out areas of research that are timely but lagging. This work is based on a comprehensive analysis of published academic and industrial literature spanning three decades, and on the experience of both ourselves and of many of our colleagues.

© All rights reserved Iachello and Hong and/or Now Publishers

2000
 
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Fisher, Danyel, Hildrum, Kris, Hong, Jason, Newman, Mark, Thomas, Megan and Vuduc, Rich (2000): SWAMI: A Framework for Collaborative Filtering Algorithm Development and Evaluation. In: Proceedings of the 23rd Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2000. pp. 366-368.

0000
 
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Iachello, Giovanni and Hong, Jason (0000): End-User Privacy in Human-Computer Interaction. In Foundations and Trends in Human-Computer Interaction, 1 (1) pp. 1-137.

The purpose of this article is twofold. First, we summarize research on the topic of privacy in Human-Computer Interaction (HCI), outlining current approaches, results, and trends. Practitioners and researchers can draw upon this review when working on topics related to privacy in the context of HCI and CSCW. The second purpose is that of charting future research trends and of pointing out areas of research that are timely but lagging. This work is based on a comprehensive analysis of published academic and industrial literature spanning three decades, and on the experience of both ourselves and of many of our colleagues.

© All rights reserved Iachello and Hong and/or Now Publishers

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/jason_hong.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:0000-2012
Pub. count:20
Number of co-authors:39



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Norman Sadeh:6
Lorrie Cranor:5
Eran Toch:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Jason Hong's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

John Zimmerman:51
Lorrie Faith Crano..:44
Aniket Kittur:27
 
 
 
Jul 22

... in an information-rich world, the wealth of information means a dearth of something else: a scarcity of whatever it is that information consumes. What information consumes is rather obvious: it consumes the attention of its recipients. Hence a wealth of information creates a poverty of attention, and a need to allocate that attention efficiently among the overabundance of information sources that might consume it.

-- Herbert Simon in "Computers, Communications and the Public Interest," 1971

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!