Publication statistics

Pub. period:2006-2012
Pub. count:38
Number of co-authors:58



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Thorsten Karrer:11
Malte Weiss:10
Moritz Wittenhagen:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Jan Borchers's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Martina Ziefle:87
Kris Luyten:51
James D. Hollan:49
 
 
 
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Jan Borchers

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Publications by Jan Borchers (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Walther-Franks, Benjamin, Herrlich, Marc, Karrer, Thorsten, Wittenhagen, Moritz, Schröder-Kroll, Roland, Malaka, Rainer and Borchers, Jan (2012): Dragimation: direct manipulation keyframe timing for performance-based animation. In: Proceedings of the 2012 Conference on Graphics Interface 2012. pp. 101-108.

Getting the timing and dynamics right is key to creating believable and interesting animations. However, using traditional keyframe animation techniques, timing is a tedious and abstract process. In this paper we present Dragimation, a novel technique for interactive performative timing of keyframe animations. It is inspired by direct manipulation techniques for video navigation that leverage the natural sense of timing all of us possess. We conducted a user study with 27 participants including professional animators as well as novices, in which we compared our approach to two other interactive timing techniques, timeline scrubbing and sketch-based timing. Dragimation is comparable regarding objective error measurements to the sketch-based approach and significantly better than scrubbing and is the overall preferred technique by our test users.

© All rights reserved Walther-Franks et al. and/or their publisher

2011
 
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Heidrich, Felix, Ziefle, Martina, Röcker, Carsten and Borchers, Jan (2011): Interacting with smart walls: a multi-dimensional analysis of input technologies for augmented environments. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Augmented Human International Conference 2011. p. 1.

This paper reports on a multi-dimensional evaluation of three typical interaction devices for wall-sized displays in augmented environments. Touch, trackpad and gesture input were evaluated regarding a variety of usability dimensions in order to understand the quality profile of each input device. Among the three interaction devices, the touch input showed the highest scores in performance and acceptance as well as hedonic value.

© All rights reserved Heidrich et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Wacharamanotham, Chat, Hurtmanns, Jan, Mertens, Alexander, Kronenbuerger, Martin, Schlick, Christopher and Borchers, Jan (2011): Evaluating swabbing: a touchscreen input method for elderly users with tremor. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 623-626.

Elderly users suffering from hand tremor have difficulties interacting with touchscreens because of finger oscillation. It has been previously observed that sliding one's finger across the screen may help reduce this oscillation. In this work, we empirically confirm this advantage by (1) measuring finger oscillation during different actions and (2) comparing error rate and user satisfaction between traditional tapping and swabbing in which the user slides his finger towards a target on a screen edge to select it. We found that oscillation is generally reduced during sliding. Also, compared to tapping, swabbing resulted in improved error rates and user satisfaction. We believe that swabbing will make touchscreens more accessible to senior users with tremor.

© All rights reserved Wacharamanotham et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Karrer, Thorsten, Wittenhagen, Moritz, Lichtschlag, Leonhard, Heller, Florian and Borchers, Jan (2011): Pinstripe: eyes-free continuous input on interactive clothing. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1313-1322.

We present Pinstripe, a textile user interface element for eyes-free, continuous value input on smart garments that uses pinching and rolling a piece of cloth between your fingers. The input granularity can be controlled in a natural way by varying the amount of cloth pinched. Pinstripe input elements physically consist of fields of parallel conductive lines sewn onto the fabric. This way, they can be invisible, and can be included across large areas of a garment. Pinstripe also addresses several problems previously identified in the placement and operation of textile UI elements on smart clothing. Two user studies evaluate ideal placement and orientation of Pinstripe elements on the users' garments as well as acceptance and perceived ease of use of this novel textile input technique.

© All rights reserved Karrer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Weiss, Malte, Remy, Christian and Borchers, Jan (2011): Rendering physical effects in tabletop controls. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3009-3012.

We introduce dynamic physical properties as an additional degree of freedom for passive tabletop controls. Using electromagnetic actuation, we manipulate attributes of tangibles on the fly, such as perceived weight, spring resistance, friction, and latching. We describe our actuation concepts, prototypes, and measurements showing that magnetic fields can change physical effects in a linear way. Controlled experiments reveal that participants can tactually distinguish four rendered resistance levels of a button prototype and easily detect dynamic detents in a continuous slider. Finally, we describe how adjustable physical properties in tangibles can enhance tabletop interaction.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Jansen, Yvonne, Karrer, Thorsten and Borchers, Jan (2011): MudPad: tactile feedback for touch surfaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 323-328.

MudPad is a system enriching touch surfaces with localized active haptic feedback. A soft and flexible overlay containing magnetorheological fluid is actuated by an array of electromagnets to create a variety of tactile sensations. As each magnet can be controlled individually, we are able to produce feedback in realtime locally at arbitrary points of interaction.

© All rights reserved Jansen et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Möllers, Max, Bohnenberger, Ray, Deininghaus, Stephan, Zimmer, Patrick, Herrmann, Karin and Borchers, Jan (2011): TaPS Widgets: tangible control over private spaces on interactive tabletops. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 773-780.

Private areas are important in multi-user tabletop systems, but hard to implement with current technology. Existing approaches usually involve wearable devices such as shutter glasses or head-mounted displays that are cumbersome to wear. We present TaPS, lightweight transparent widgets that only pass light coming from a particular direction to shield the content beneath them from other users, creating Tangible Private Spaces. TaPS widgets use low-cost hardware to provide tangible privacy controls to interactive tabletops. Informal studies indicate that TaPS widgets enable users to successfully move documents between public and private tabletop spaces without compromising privacy.

© All rights reserved Möllers et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Heller, Florian, Lichtschlag, Leonhard, Wittenhagen, Moritz, Karrer, Thorsten and Borchers, Jan (2011): Me hates this: exploring different levels of user feedback for (usability) bug reporting. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1357-1362.

User feedback for deployed software systems ranges from simple one-bit-feedback to full-blown bug reports. While detailed bug reports are very helpful for the developers to track down problems, the expertise and commitment required from the user is high. We analyzed existing user report systems and propose a flexible and independent hard- and software architecture to collect user feedback. We report our results from a preliminary two-week user study testing the system in the field and discuss challenges and solutions for the collection of multiple levels of user feedback through different modalities.

© All rights reserved Heller et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Heller, Florian and Borchers, Jan (2011): PowerSocket: towards on-outlet power consumption visualization. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1981-1986.

Power consumption is measured in W and Wh, but what do these units mean? Water consumption can easily be understood, as we all know what a liter of water looks like. Common power meters, however, rely on the physical units or their translation to costs as display. We classified existing displays and ambient visualizations in a taxonomy that focuses on the characteristics of power consumption displays. We adapted representatives of the different categories of displays to an on-outlet display and compared these using a combination of soft- and hardware prototyping. Results indicate that ambient visualizations make it easier to understand power consumption.

© All rights reserved Heller and Borchers and/or their publisher

 
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Luyten, Kris, Vanacken, Davy, Weiss, Malte, Borchers, Jan and Nacenta, Miguel (2011): Second workshop on engineering patterns for multi-touch interfaces. In: ACM SIGCHI 2011 Symposium on Engineering Interactive Computing Systems 2011. pp. 335-336.

Multi-touch gained a lot of interest in the last couple of years and the increased availability of multi-touch enabled hardware boosted its development. However, the current diversity of hardware, toolkits, and tools for creating multi-touch interfaces has its downsides: there is only little reusable material and no generally accepted body of knowledge when it comes to the development of multi-touch interfaces. This workshop is the second workshop on this topic and the workshop goal remains unchanged: to seek a consensus on methods, approaches, toolkits, and tools that aid in the engineering of multi-touch interfaces and transcend the differences in available platforms. The patterns mentioned in the title indicate that we are aiming to create a reusable body of knowledge.

© All rights reserved Luyten et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Möllers, Max and Borchers, Jan (2011): TaPS widgets: interacting with tangible private spaces. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2011. pp. 75-78.

Interacting with private data is important in multi-user table-top systems, but hard to implement with current technology. Existing approaches usually involve wearable devices such as shutter glasses or head-mounted displays that are cumbersome to wear. We present TaPS, lightweight transparent widgets that only pass light coming from a particular direction to shield the content beneath them from other users, creating Tangible Private Spaces. TaPS widgets use low-cost hardware to provide tangible privacy controls to interactive tabletops. Informal studies indicate that TaPS widgets enable users to successfully move documents between public and private tabletop spaces without compromising privacy and allow for secret data entry.

© All rights reserved Möllers and Borchers and/or ACM Press

 
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Voelker, Simon, Weiss, Malte, Wacharamanotham, Chat and Borchers, Jan (2011): Dynamic portals: a lightweight metaphor for fast object transfer on interactive surfaces. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2011. pp. 158-161.

We introduce Dynamic Portals, a lightweight interaction technique to transfer virtual objects across tabletops. They maintain the spatial coherence of objects and inherently align them to the recipients' workspace. Furthermore, they allow the exchange of digital documents among multiple users. A remote view enables users to align their objects at the target location. This paper explores the interaction technique and shows how our concept can also be applied as zoomable viewport and shared workspace.

© All rights reserved Voelker et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Karrer, Thorsten, Krämer, Jan-Peter, Diehl, Jonathan, Hartmann, Björn and Borchers, Jan (2011): Stacksplorer: call graph navigation helps increasing code maintenance efficiency. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 217-224.

We present Stacksplorer, a new tool to support source code navigation and comprehension. Stacksplorer computes the call graph of a given piece of code, visualizes relevant parts of it, and allows developers to interactively traverse it. This augments the traditional code editor by offering an additional layer of navigation. Stacksplorer is particularly useful to understand and edit unknown source code because branches of the call graph can be explored and backtracked easily. Visualizing the callers of a method reduces the risk of introducing unintended side effects. In a quantitative study, programmers using Stacksplorer performed three of four software maintenance tasks significantly faster and with higher success rates, and Stacksplorer received a System Usability Scale rating of 85.4 from participants.

© All rights reserved Karrer et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiss, Malte, Wacharamanotham, Chat, Voelker, Simon and Borchers, Jan (2011): FingerFlux: near-surface haptic feedback on tabletops. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 615-620.

We introduce FingerFlux, an output technique to generate near-surface haptic feedback on interactive tabletops. Our system combines electromagnetic actuation with permanent magnets attached to the user's hand. FingerFlux lets users feel the interface before touching, and can create both attracting and repelling forces. This enables applications such as reducing drifting, adding physical constraints to virtual controls, and guiding the user without visual output. We show that users can feel vibration patterns up to 35 mm above our table, and that FingerFlux can significantly reduce drifting when operating on-screen buttons without looking.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Mennicken, Sarah, Karrer, Thorsten, Russell, Peter and Borchers, Jan (2010): First-person cooking: a dual-perspective interactive kitchen counter. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3403-3408.

Hobby chefs have various ways to learn cooking-paper recipes or cooking shows, for example. However, information in paper recipes may require prior experience to be understood and a television show cannot adapt to a viewer's individual speed. Based on our findings on cooking habits, we are developing PersonalChef to unravel the complexity of recipes in order to increase users' confidence and fun when preparing an unknown recipe. PersonalChef is a multi-display, dual-perspective, interactive kitchen counter to support users in-situ while cooking and to teach them about food preparation. In addition to an interactive "personal chef" on a screen behind the stove, the user can retrieve as much or as little information as needed/wanted using a display embedded in the kitchen counter.

© All rights reserved Mennicken et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Drobny, Dieter and Borchers, Jan (2010): Learning basic dance choreographies with different augmented feedback modalities. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3793-3798.

We plan to evaluate different kinds of augmented feedback (tactile, video, sound) for learning basic dance choreographies. Therefore we develop a dance training system based on motion capturing technology. In this work we describe and put up for discussion its capabilities and our methodological approach.

© All rights reserved Drobny and Borchers and/or their publisher

 
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Weiss, Malte, Schwarz, Florian, Jakubowski, Simon and Borchers, Jan (2010): Madgets: actuating widgets on interactive tabletops. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 293-302.

We present a system for the actuation of tangible magnetic widgets (Madgets) on interactive tabletops. Our system combines electromagnetic actuation with fiber optic tracking to move and operate physical controls. The presented mechanism supports actuating complex tangibles that consist of multiple parts. A grid of optical fibers transmits marker positions past our actuation hardware to cameras below the table. We introduce a visual tracking algorithm that is able to detect objects and touches from the strongly sub-sampled video input of that grid. Six sample Madgets illustrate the capabilities of our approach, ranging from tangential movement and height actuation to inductive power transfer. Madgets combine the benefits of passive, untethered, and translucent tangibles with the ability to actuate them with multiple degrees of freedom.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Jansen, Yvonne, Karrer, Thorsten and Borchers, Jan (2010): MudPad: localized tactile feedback on touch surfaces. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 385-386.

We present MudPad, a system that is capable of localized active haptic feedback on multitouch surfaces. An array of electromagnets locally actuates a tablet-sized overlay containing magnetorheological (MR) fluid. The reaction time of the fluid is fast enough for realtime feedback ranging from static levels of surface softness to a broad set of dynamically changeable textures. As each area can be addressed individually, the entire visual interface can be enriched with a multi-touch haptic layer that conveys semantic information as the appropriate counterpart to multi-touch input.

© All rights reserved Jansen et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Karrer, Thorsten, Wittenhagen, Moritz, Heller, Florian and Borchers, Jan (2010): Pinstripe: eyes-free continuous input anywhere on interactive clothing. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 429-430.

We present Pinstripe, a textile user interface element for eyes-free, continuous value input on smart garments that uses pinching and rolling a piece of cloth between your fingers. Input granularity can be controlled by the amount of cloth pinched. Pinstripe input elements are invisible, and can be included across large areas of a garment. Pinstripe thus addresses several problems previously identified in the placement and operation of textile UI elements on smart clothing.

© All rights reserved Karrer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Krämer, Jan-Peter, Karrer, Thorsten, Diehl, Jonathan and Borchers, Jan (2010): Stacksplorer: understanding dynamic program behavior. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 433-434.

To thoroughly comprehend application behavior, programmers need to understand the interactions of objects at runtime. Today, these interactions are often poorly visualized in common IDEs except during debugging. Stacksplorer allows visualizing and traversing potential call stacks in an application even when it is not running by showing callers and called methods in two columns next to the code editor. The relevant information is gathered from the source code automatically.

© All rights reserved Krämer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Lichtschlag, Leonhard and Borchers, Jan (2010): CodeGraffiti: communication by sketching for pair programmers. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 439-440.

In pair programming, two software developers work on their code together in front of a single workstation, one typing, the other commenting. This frequently involves pointing to code on the screen, annotating it verbally, or sketching on paper or a nearby whiteboard, little of which is captured in the source code for later reference. CodeGraffiti lets pair programmers simultaneously write their code, and annotate it with ephemeral and persistent sketches on screen using touch or pen input. We integrated CodeGraffiti into the Xcode software development environment, to study how these techniques may improve the pair programming workflow.

© All rights reserved Lichtschlag and Borchers and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Weiss, Malte, Wagner, Julie, Jansen, Yvonne, Jennings, Roger, Khoshabeh, Ramsin, Hollan, James D. and Borchers, Jan (2009): SLAP widgets: bridging the gap between virtual and physical controls on tabletops. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 481-490.

We present Silicone iLluminated Active Peripherals (SLAP), a system of tangible, translucent widgets for use on multitouch tabletops. SLAP Widgets are cast from silicone or made of acrylic, and include sliders, knobs, keyboards, and buttons. They add tactile feedback to multi-touch tables, improving input accuracy. Using rear projection, SLAP Widgets can be relabeled dynamically, providing inexpensive, battery-free, and untethered augmentations. Furthermore, SLAP combines the flexibility of virtual objects with physical affordances. We evaluate how SLAP Widgets influence the user experience on tabletops compared to virtual controls. Empirical studies show that SLAPWidgets are easy to use and outperform virtual controls significantly in terms of accuracy and overall interaction time.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Lichtschlag, Leonhard, Karrer, Thorsten and Borchers, Jan (2009): Fly: a tool to author planar presentations. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 547-556.

Modern presentation software is still built around interaction metaphors adapted from traditional slide projectors. We provide an analysis of the problems in this application genre that presentation authors face and present Fly, a presentation tool that is based on the idea of planar information structures. Inspired by the natural human thought processes of data chunking, association, and spatial memory, Fly explores authoring of presentation documents. Evaluation of a paper prototype showed that the planar UI is easily grasped by users, and leads to presentations more closely resembling the information structure of the original content, thus providing better authoring support than the slide metaphor. Our software prototype confirmed these results, and outperformed PowerPoint in a second study for tasks such as prototyping presentations and generating meaningful overviews. Users reported that this interface helped them better to express their concepts, and expressed significant preference for Fly over the traditional slide model.

© All rights reserved Lichtschlag et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Spelmezan, Daniel, Jacobs, Mareike, Hilgers, Anke and Borchers, Jan (2009): Tactile motion instructions for physical activities. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 2243-2252.

While learning new motor skills, we often rely on feedback from a trainer. Auditive feedback and demonstrations are used most frequently, but in many domains they are inappropriate or impractical. We introduce tactile instructions as an alternative to assist in correcting wrong posture during physical activities, and present a set of full-body vibrotactile patterns. An initial study informed the design of our tactile patterns, and determined appropriate locations for feedback on the body. A second experiment showed that users perceived and correctly classified our tactile instruction patterns in a relaxed setting and during a cognitively and physically demanding task. In a final experiment, snowboarders on the slope compared their perception of tactile instructions with audio instructions under real-world conditions. Tactile instructions achieved overall high recognition accuracy similar to audio instructions. Moreover, participants responded quicker to instructions delivered over the tactile channel than to instructions presented over the audio channel. Our findings suggest that these full-body tactile feedback patterns can replace audio instructions during physical activities.

© All rights reserved Spelmezan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hoffmann, Alexander, Spelmezan, Daniel and Borchers, Jan (2009): TypeRight: a keyboard with tactile error prevention. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 2265-2268.

TypeRight is a new tactile input device for text entry. It combines the advantages of tactile feedback with error prevention methods of word processors. TypeRight extends the standard keyboard so that the resistance to press each key becomes dynamically adjustable through software. Before each keystroke, the resistance of keys that would lead to a typing error according to dictionary and grammar rules is increased momentarily to make them harder to press, thus avoiding typing errors rather than indicating them after the fact. Two user studies showed that TypeRight decreases error correction rates by an average of 46%.

© All rights reserved Hoffmann et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiss, Malte, Jennings, Roger, Khoshabeh, Ramsin, Borchers, Jan, Wagner, Julie, Jansen, Yvonne and Hollan, James D. (2009): SLAP widgets: bridging the gap between virtual and physical controls on tabletops. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3229-3234.

We present Silicone iLluminated Active Peripherals (SLAP), a system of tangible, transparent widgets for use on vision-based multi-touch tabletops. SLAP Widgets are cast from silicone or made of acrylic and include sliders, knobs, keyboards, and keypads. They add tactile feedback to multi-touch tables and can be dynamically relabeled with rear projection. They are inexpensive, battery-free, and untethered widgets combining the flexibility of virtual objects with tangible affordances of physical objects. Our demonstration shows how SLAP Widgets can augment input on multi-touch tabletops with modest infrastructure costs.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Drobny, Dieter, Weiss, Malte and Borchers, Jan (2009): Saltate!: a sensor-based system to support dance beginners. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3943-3948.

We present Saltate!, a wireless prototype system to support beginners of ballroom dancing. Saltate! acquires data from force sensors mounted under the dancers' feet, detects steps, and compares their timing to the timing of beats in the music playing. If it detects mistakes, Saltate! emphasizes the beats in the music acoustically to help the dancing couple stay in sync with the music.

© All rights reserved Drobny et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Heller, Florian, Knott, Thomas, Weiss, Malte and Borchers, Jan (2009): Multi-user interaction in virtual audio spaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4489-4494.

Audio guides are a common way to provide museum visitors with an opportunity for personalized, self-paced information retrieval. However, this personalization conflicts with some of the reasons many people go to museums, i.e., to socialize, to be with friends, and to discuss the exhibit as they experience it [1]. We developed an interactive museum experience based on audio augmented reality that lets the visitor interact with a virtual spatial audio soundscape. In this paper, we present some new interaction metaphors we use in the design of this audio space, as well as some techniques to generate a group experience within audio spaces.

© All rights reserved Heller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Möllers, Max, Diehl, Jonathan, Jordans, Markus and Borchers, Jan (2009): Towards systematic usability verification. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4645-4650.

Although usability is the core aspect of the whole HCI research field, it still waits for its economic breakthrough. There are some corporations that are famous for their usable products, but small and medium-sized businesses tend to prefer features over usability. We think, the primary reason is that there are no inexpensive methods to at least prevent huge design flaws. We propose the use of test specifications. Once defined for a domain, these allow non-usability experts to systematically verify the usability of a given system without any users involved. We picked a sample domain with some basic tasks and found strong indication of our hypothesis: test specifications can be applied by non-experts and are able to find major design flaws. Future work will extend this method to more complex tasks and evaluate the economic benefit.

© All rights reserved Möllers et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiss, Malte, Wagner, Julie, Jennings, Roger, Jansen, Yvonne, Khoshabeh, Ramsin, Hollan, James D. and Borchers, Jan (2009): SLAPbook: tangible widgets on multi-touch tables in groupware environments. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 297-300.

 
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Spelmezan, Daniel, Hilgers, Anke and Borchers, Jan (2009): A language of tactile motion instructions. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 29.

Tactile motion instructions are vibrotactile feedback patterns delivered across the entire body that indicate how to move during physical activities. This work investigates the perception and identification of such patterns, based on two different metaphors, under stationary and active situations. We further combine and sequentially trigger different patterns to explore whether tactile motion instructions are understandable as a simple language. A tactile language could represent motion sequences to guide students during demanding exercises. Finally, the presented studies provide insights into perception and interpretation of tactile feedback and help to inform a design space for full-body vibrotactile cues.

© All rights reserved Spelmezan et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Karrer, Thorsten, Wittenhagen, Moritz and Borchers, Jan (2009): PocketDRAGON: a direct manipulation video navigation interface for mobile devices. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 47.

We present PocketDRAGON, a demonstrator prototype that allows direct manipulation video navigation on mobile touchscreen devices. In contrast to traditional video navigation techniques, PocketDRAGON does not require any overlay UI elements that occupy valuable screen real estate and obstruct the users' view on the video. Also, direct manipulation video navigation techniques have been shown to compare favorably to the established timeline slider interfaces in terms of performance times, intuitiveness, precision, and perceived ease of use. Our demonstrator system still uses a backend server for the computationally expensive parts of the algorithms but delivers the full-fledged user experience on the mobile device.

© All rights reserved Karrer et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Diehl, Jonathan, Atak, Deniz and Borchers, Jan (2008): Associative Information Spaces. In: Henze, Niels, Broll, Gregor, Rukzio, Enrico, Rohs, Michael, Zimmermann, Andreas and Boll, Susanne (eds.) Mobile Interaction with the Real World 2008 - MIRW 2008 - Mobile HCI Workshop September 2, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherland. pp. 127-138.

 
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Sutter, Christine, Müsseler, Jochen, Bardos, Laszlo, Ballagas, Rafael and Borchers, Jan (2008): The impact of gain change on perceiving one's own actions. In: Herczeg, Michael and Kindsmüller, Martin Christof (eds.) Mensch and Computer 2008 7-10 September, 2008, Lübeck, Germany. pp. 147-156.

 
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Borchers, Jan (2008): An ode to TomTom: sweet spots and baroque phases of interactive technology lifecycles. In Interactions, 15 (2) pp. 62-66.

 
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Huang, Elaine M., Koster, Anna and Borchers, Jan (2008): Overcoming Assumptions and Uncovering Practices: When Does the Public Really Look at Public Displays?. In: Indulska, Jadwiga, Patterson, Donald J., Rodden, Tom and Ott, Max (eds.) Pervasive 2008 - Pervasive Computing, 6th International Conference May 19-22, 2008, Sydney, Australia. pp. 228-243.

2007
 
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Smith, J. David, Graham, T. C. Nicholas, Holman, David and Borchers, Jan (2007): Low-Cost Malleable Surfaces with Multi-Touch Pressure Sensitivity. In: Second IEEE International Workshop on Horizontal Interactive Human-Computer Systems Tabletop 2007 October 10-12, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 205-208.

2006
 
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Ballagas, Rafael, Borchers, Jan, Rohs, Michael and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2006): The Smart Phone: A Ubiquitous Input Device. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 5 (1) pp. 70-77.

 
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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/jan_borchers.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2006-2012
Pub. count:38
Number of co-authors:58



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Thorsten Karrer:11
Malte Weiss:10
Moritz Wittenhagen:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Jan Borchers's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Martina Ziefle:87
Kris Luyten:51
James D. Hollan:49
 
 
 
Jul 30

It's all about one thing: creative problem-solving to get the story out.

-- Robert Greenberg, R/GA, 2006

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

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