Publication statistics

Pub. period:-2012
Pub. count:49
Number of co-authors:67



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Benjamin B. Bederson:8
Anne Marie Piper:8
Nadir Weibel:8

 

 

Productive colleagues

James D. Hollan's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

John M. Carroll:209
Scott E. Hudson:113
Jakob Nielsen:109
 
 
 

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James D. Hollan

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Has also published under the name of:
"James Hollan", "J. Hollan", and "Jim Hollan"

Personal Homepage:
http://hci.ucsd.edu/hollan/

James D. Hollan is Professor of Cognitive Science and Adjunct Professor of Computer Science at the University of California, San Diego. In collaboration with Professor Edwin Hutchins, he directs the Distributed Cognition and Human-Computer Interaction Laboratory at UCSD. His research explores the cognitive consequences of computationally-based media. The goal is to understand the cognitive and computational characteristics of dynamic interactive representations as the basis for effective system design. His current work focuses on cognitive ethnography, computer-mediated communication, distributed cognition, human-computer interaction, information visualization, multiscale software, and tools for analysis of video data. His current research is funded by the National Science Foundation (NSF), Intel, Nissan, and the University of California's Digital Media Innovation program. Recently completed research has been funded by Darpa, Intel, NSF, and Sony. After completing a Ph.D. in cognitive psychology at the University of Florida and a postdoctoral fellowship in artificial intelligence at Stanford University, Hollan was on the research faculty at the University of California, San Diego for a decade. Along with Edwin Hutchins and Donald Norman, he led the Intelligent Systems Group in the Institute for Cognitive Science at UCSD and the Future Technologies Group at NPRDC. Hollan left UCSD to become Director of the MCC Human Interface Laboratory and subsequently established the Computer Graphics and Interactive Media Research Group at Bellcore. In 1993, he moved to the University of New Mexico as Chair of the Computer Science Department. In 1997, Hollan returned to UCSD as Professor of Cognitive Science.

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Publications by James D. Hollan (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Piper, Anne Marie, Weibel, Nadir and Hollan, James D. (2012): A pen-based toolkit for authoring collaborative language activities. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 269-270

Hybrid paper-digital interfaces enabled by digital pens are a promising approach for supporting collaborative language, communication, and socialization activities. Digital pens enhance interaction with traditional paper content by playing and recording audio and recognizing handwriting and gestures. Currently, generating custom interactive paper documents involves some programming, limiting its use by many user groups (e.g., educators and families) who might especially benefit from application of hybrid paper-digital interfaces in their practices. To address this need, we developed an end-user Toolkit for Authoring Pen and Paper Language Activities (TAP&PLAY). End-users are able to quickly create custom interactive materials to support collocated interaction between children, teachers, and family members.

© All rights reserved Piper et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Fouse, Adam, Weibel, Nadir, Hutchins, Edwin and Hollan, James D. (2011): ChronoViz: a system for supporting navigation of time-coded data. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 299-304

We present ChronoViz, a system to aid annotation, visualization, navigation, and analysis of multimodal time-coded data. Exploiting interactive paper technology, ChronoViz also integrates researcher's paper notes into the composite data set. Researchers can navigate data in multiple ways, taking advantage of synchronized visualizations and annotations. The goal is to decrease the time and effort required to analyze multimodal data by providing direct indexing and flexible mechanisms to control data exploration.

© All rights reserved Fouse et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Steimle, Jrgen, Weibel, Nadir, Olberding, Simon, Mhlhuser, Max and Hollan, James D. (2011): PLink: paper-based links for cross-media information spaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1969-1974

PLink is a system for integrating physical and computer desktops by creating paper links to digital resources. PLink leverages diverse formats of physical paper, ranging from tiny stickers that can be easily incorporated into traditional paper media to very large deskpad sheets that make the physical desktop partially interactive. We present PLink and initial results from a multi-week field study.

© All rights reserved Steimle et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Cowan, Lisa G., Weibel, Nadir, Pina, Laura R., Hollan, James D. and Griswold, William G. (2011): Ubiquitous sketching for social media. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 395-404

Digital social media have transformed how we communicate and manage our relationships. Despite its portability, sketching as a social medium has been largely left behind. Given sketching's unique affordances for visual communication this absence is a real loss. Sketches convey visuo-spatial ideas directly, require minimal detail to render concepts, and show the peculiarities of handwriting. Sketching holds the promise to enrich how we communicate, and its ubiquity is critical for sharing information at opportune moments. We present the results of an exploratory field study of ubiquitous sketching for social media, documenting users' experiences with UbiSketch. This system integrates digital pens, paper, and mobile phones to support the transmission of paper sketches to online services. We learned that UbiSketch enabled participants to leverage sketching's unique affordances, that ubiquitous sketching creates a synergy with the practice of posting context-dependent information, and that it broadens and deepens social interaction.

© All rights reserved Cowan et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Piper, Anne Marie, Campbell, Ross and Hollan, James D. (2010): Exploring the accessibility and appeal of surface computing for older adult health care support. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 907-916

This paper examines accessibility issues of surface computing with older adults and explores the appeal of surface computing for health care support. We present results from a study involving 20 older adults (age 60 to 88) performing gesture-based interactions on a multitouch surface. Older adults were able to successfully perform all actions on the surface computer, but some gestures that required two fingers (resize) and fine motor movement (rotate) were problematic. Ratings for ease of use and ease of performing each action as well as time required to figure out an action were similar to that of younger adults. Older adults reported that the surface computer was less intimidating, less frustrating, and less overwhelming than a traditional computer. The idea of using a surface computer for health care support was well-received by participants. We conclude with a discussion of design issues involving surface computing for older adults and use of this technology for health care.

© All rights reserved Piper et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Weibel, Nadir, Cowan, Lisa G., Pina, Laura R., Griswold, William G. and Hollan, James D. (2010): Enabling social interactions through real-time sketch-based communication. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 405-406

We present UbiSketch, a tool for ubiquitous real-time sketch-based communication. We describe the UbiSketch system, which enables people to create doodles, drawings, and notes with digital pens and paper and publish them quickly and easily via their mobile phones to social communication channels, such as Facebook, Twitter, and email. The natural paper-based social interaction enabled by UbiSketch has the potential to enrich current mobile communication practices.

© All rights reserved Weibel et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Weibel, Nadir, Piper, Anne Marie and Hollan, James D. (2010): HIPerPaper: introducing pen and paper interfaces for ultra-scale wall displays. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 407-408

While recent advances in graphics, display, and computer hardware support ultra-scale visualizations of a tremendous amount of data sets, mechanisms for interacting with this information on large high-resolution wall displays are still under investigation. Different issues in terms of user interface, ergonomics, multi-user interaction, and system flexibility arise while facing ultra-scale wall displays and none of the introduced approaches fully address them. We introduce HIPerPaper, a novel digital pen and paper interface that enables natural interaction with the HIPerSpace wall, a 31.8 by 7.5 foot tiled wall display of 268,720,000 pixels. HIPerPaper provides a flexible, portable, and inexpensive medium for interacting with large high-resolution wall displays.

© All rights reserved Weibel et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Weibel, Nadir, Piper, Anne Marie and Hollan, James D. (2010): Exploring pen and paper interaction with high-resolution wall displays. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 455-456

We introduce HIPerPaper, a novel digital pen and paper interface that enables natural interaction with a 31.8 by 7.5 foot tiled wall display of 268,720,000 pixels. HIPerPaper provides a flexible, portable, and inexpensive medium for interacting with large high-resolution wall displays. While the size and resolution of such displays allow visualization of data sets of a scale not previously possible, mechanisms for interacting with wall displays remain challenging. HIPerPaper enables multiple concurrent users to select, move, scale, and rotate objects on a high-dimension wall display.

© All rights reserved Weibel et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Piper, Anne Marie, Weibel, Nadir and Hollan, James D. (2010): Introducing Multimodal Paper-Digital Interfaces for Speech-Language Therapy. In: Proceedings of ASSETS 2010, 12th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility October, 2010, Orlando, FL, USA.

After a stroke or brain injury, it may be more difficult to understand language and communicate with others. Speech-language therapy may help an individual regain language and cope with changes in their communication abilities. Our research examines the process of speech-language therapy with an emphasis on the practices of therapists working with adults with aphasia and apraxia of speech. This paper presents findings from field work undertaken to inform the design of a mixed paper-digital interface prototype using multimodal digital pens. We describe and analyze therapists' initial reactions to the system and present two case studies of use by older adults undergoing speech-language therapy. We discuss the utility of multimodal paper-digital interfaces to assist therapy and describe our vision of a system to help therapists independently create custom interactive paper materials for their clients.

© All rights reserved Piper et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hollan, James D. (2010): Multiscale zooming interfaces: a brief personal perspective on the design of cognitively convivial interaction. In Interactions, 17 (6) pp. 71-74

2009
 
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Weiss, Malte, Wagner, Julie, Jansen, Yvonne, Jennings, Roger, Khoshabeh, Ramsin, Hollan, James D. and Borchers, Jan (2009): SLAP widgets: bridging the gap between virtual and physical controls on tabletops. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 481-490.

We present Silicone iLluminated Active Peripherals (SLAP), a system of tangible, translucent widgets for use on multitouch tabletops. SLAP Widgets are cast from silicone or made of acrylic, and include sliders, knobs, keyboards, and buttons. They add tactile feedback to multi-touch tables, improving input accuracy. Using rear projection, SLAP Widgets can be relabeled dynamically, providing inexpensive, battery-free, and untethered augmentations. Furthermore, SLAP combines the flexibility of virtual objects with physical affordances. We evaluate how SLAP Widgets influence the user experience on tabletops compared to virtual controls. Empirical studies show that SLAPWidgets are easy to use and outperform virtual controls significantly in terms of accuracy and overall interaction time.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Piper, Anne Marie and Hollan, James D. (2009): Tabletop displays for small group study: affordances of paper and digital materials. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1227-1236.

In this paper we compare the affordances of presenting educational material on a tabletop display with presenting the same material using traditional paper handouts. Ten pairs of undergraduate students used digital or paper materials to prepare for exams during four one-hour study sessions over the course of a term. Students studying with the tabletop display solved problems on their own before resorting to answer keys and repeated activities more often than students studying with paper documents. We summarize study activities and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of each medium.

© All rights reserved Piper and Hollan and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiss, Malte, Jennings, Roger, Khoshabeh, Ramsin, Borchers, Jan, Wagner, Julie, Jansen, Yvonne and Hollan, James D. (2009): SLAP widgets: bridging the gap between virtual and physical controls on tabletops. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3229-3234.

We present Silicone iLluminated Active Peripherals (SLAP), a system of tangible, transparent widgets for use on vision-based multi-touch tabletops. SLAP Widgets are cast from silicone or made of acrylic and include sliders, knobs, keyboards, and keypads. They add tactile feedback to multi-touch tables and can be dynamically relabeled with rear projection. They are inexpensive, battery-free, and untethered widgets combining the flexibility of virtual objects with tangible affordances of physical objects. Our demonstration shows how SLAP Widgets can augment input on multi-touch tabletops with modest infrastructure costs.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Khoshabeh, Ramsin and Hollan, James D. (2009): Spatio-temporal interest points for video analysis. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3455-3460.

In this paper, we discuss the need for an effective representation of video data to aid analysis of large datasets of video clips and describe a prototype developed to explore the use of spatio-temporal interest points for action recognition. Our focus is on ways that computation can assist analysis.

© All rights reserved Khoshabeh and Hollan and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiss, Malte, Wagner, Julie, Jennings, Roger, Jansen, Yvonne, Khoshabeh, Ramsin, Hollan, James D. and Borchers, Jan (2009): SLAPbook: tangible widgets on multi-touch tables in groupware environments. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 297-300.

 
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Piper, Anne Marie and Hollan, James D. (2009): Analyzing Multimodal Communication around a Shared Tabletop Display. In: Proceedings of the 11th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2009. pp. 283-302

Communication between people is inherently multimodal. People employ speech, facial expressions, eye gaze, and gesture, among other facilities, to support communication and cooperative activity. Complexity of communication increases when a person is without a modality such as hearing, often resulting in dependence on another person or an assistive device to facilitate communication. This paper examines communication about medical topics through Shared Speech Interface, a multimodal tabletop display designed to assist communication between a hearing and deaf individual by converting speech-to-text and representing dialogue history on a shared interactive display surface. We compare communication mediated by a multimodal tabletop display and by a human sign language interpreter. Results indicate that the multimodal tabletop display (1) allows the deaf patient to watch the doctor when she is speaking, (2) encourages the doctor to exploit multimodal communication such as co-occurring gesture-speech, and (3) provides shared access to persistent, collaboratively produced representations of conversation. We also describe extensions of this communication technology, discuss how multimodal analysis techniques are useful in understanding the affects of multiuser multimodal tabletop systems, and briefly allude to the potential of applying computer vision techniques to assist analysis.

© All rights reserved Piper and Hollan and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Sohn, Timothy, Li, Kevin A., Griswold, William G. and Hollan, James D. (2008): A diary study of mobile information needs. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 433-442.

Being mobile influences not only the types of information people seek but also the ways they attempt to access it. Mobile contexts present challenges of changing location and social context, restricted time for information access, and the need to share attentional resources among concurrent activities. Understanding mobile information needs and associated interaction challenges is fundamental to improving designs for mobile phones and related devices. We conducted a two-week diary study to better understand mobile information needs and how they are addressed. Our study revealed that depending on the time and resources available, as well as the situational context, people use diverse and, at times, ingenious ways to obtain needed information. We summarize key findings and discuss design implications for mobile technology.

© All rights reserved Sohn et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Piper, Anne Marie and Hollan, James D. (2008): Supporting medical conversations between deaf and hearing individuals with tabletop displays. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 147-156.

This paper describes the design and evaluation of Shared Speech Interface (SSI), an application for an interactive multitouch tabletop display designed to facilitate medical conversations between a deaf patient and a hearing, non-signing physician. We employ a participatory design process involving members of the deaf community as well as medical and communication experts. We report results from an evaluation that compares conversation when facilitated by: (1) a digital table, (2) a human sign language interpreter, and (3) both a digital table and an interpreter. Our research reveals that tabletop displays have valuable properties for facilitating discussion between deaf and hearing individuals as well as enhancing privacy and independence. The contributions of this work include initial guidelines for cooperative group work technology for users with varying hearing abilities, discussion of benefits of participatory design with the deaf community, and lessons about using dictated speech on shared displays.

© All rights reserved Piper and Hollan and/or ACM Press

 
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Li, Kevin A., Baudisch, Patrick, Griswold, William G. and Hollan, James D. (2008): Tapping and rubbing: exploring new dimensions of tactile feedback with voice coil motors. In: Cousins, Steve B. and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (eds.) Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 19-22, 2008, Monterey, CA, USA. pp. 181-190.

2007
 
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Becvar, L. Amaya and Hollan, James D. (2007): Transparency and technology appropriation: social impacts of a video blogging system in dental hygiene clinical instruction. In: GROUP07: International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2007. pp. 311-320.

This work describes a multi-year ethnography-for-design study in a dental hygiene training program in San Diego, USA. We performed an ethnographic analysis of instructional practices used in clinical instruction, and helped design a new training laboratory, equipped with digital media technology, through which students and instructors could access a video blogging ('vlogging') system. We present an analysis of how the vlogging system transformed social and instructional interactions in clinical training. Additionally, we describe how the faculty's appropriation of vlog technology was initially challenged by the presentation of divergent methodology in vlog records, and increased transparency of teaching practices in video records.

© All rights reserved Becvar and Hollan and/or ACM Press

 
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Liao, Chunyuan, Guimbretiere, Francois, Hinckley, Ken and Hollan, James D. (2007): Papiercraft: A gesture-based command system for interactive paper. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 14 (4) p. 18.

Paper persists as an integral component of active reading and other knowledge-worker tasks because it provides ease of use unmatched by digital alternatives. Paper documents are light to carry, easy to annotate, rapid to navigate, flexible to manipulate, and robust to use in varied environments. Interactions with paper documents create rich webs of annotation, cross reference, and spatial organization. Unfortunately, the resulting webs are confined to the physical world of paper and, as they accumulate, become increasingly difficult to store, search, and access. XLibris [Schilit et al. 1998] and similar systems address these difficulties by simulating paper with tablet PCs. While this approach is promising, it suffers not only from limitations of current tablet computers (e.g., limited screen space) but also from loss of invaluable paper affordances. In this article, we describe PapierCraft, a gesture-based command system that allows users to manipulate digital documents using paper printouts as proxies. Using an Anoto [Anoto 2002] digital pen, users can draw command gestures on paper to tag a paragraph, e-mail a selected area, copy selections to a notepad, or create links to related documents. Upon pen synchronization, PapierCraft executes the commands and presents the results in a digital document viewer. Users can then search the tagged information and navigate the web of annotated digital documents resulting from interactions with the paper proxies. PapierCraft also supports real time interactions across mix-media, for example, letting users copy information from paper to a Tablet PC screen. This article presents the design and implementation of the PapierCraft system and describes user feedback from initial use.

© All rights reserved Liao et al. and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Foley, James D., Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel, Grudin, Jonathan, Hollan, James D., Hudson, Scott E., Olson, Judy and Verplank, Bill (2005): Graduate education in human-computer interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 2113-2114.

HCI, course outlines, curricula, degree programs, digital library, graduate education, teaching materials

© All rights reserved Foley et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bauer, Daniel, Fastrez, Pierre and Hollan, James D. (2005): Spatial Tools for Managing Personal Information Collections. In: HICSS 2005 - 38th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 3-6 January, 2005, Big Island, HI, USA. .

 
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Sit, Ryan Y., Hollan, James D. and Griswold, William G. (2005): Digital Photos as Conversational Anchors. In: HICSS 2005 - 38th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 3-6 January, 2005, Big Island, HI, USA. .

2004
 
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Bauer, Daniel, Fastrez, Pierre and Hollan, James D. (2004): Computationally-Enriched 'Piles' for Managing Digital Photo Collections. In: VL-HCC 2004 - IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing 26-29 September, 2004, Rome, Italy. pp. 193-195.

2003
 
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Bauer, Daniel and Hollan, James D. (2003): IRYS: a visualization tool for temporal analysis of multimodal interaction. In: Oviatt, Sharon L., Darrell, Trevor, Maybury, Mark T. and Wahlster, Wolfgang (eds.) Proceedings of the 5th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2003 November 5-7, 2003, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 285-288.

 
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Bauer, Daniel and Hollan, James D. (2003): IRYS: a visualization tool for temporal analysis of multimodal interaction. In: Proceedings of the 2003 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2003. pp. 285-288

IRYS is a tool for the replay and analysis of gaze and touch behavior during on-line activities. Essentially a "multimodal VCR", it can record and replay computer screen activity and overlay this video with a synchronized "spotlight" of the user's attention, as measured by an eye-tracking and/or touch-tracking system. This cross-platform tool is particularly useful for detailed ethnographic analysis of "natural" on-line behavior involving multiple applications and windows in a continually changing workspace.

© All rights reserved Bauer and Hollan and/or their publisher

 
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Kaptelinin, Victor, Nardi, Bonnie A., Bdker, Susanne, Carroll, John M., Hollan, James D., Hutchins, Edwin and Winograd, Terry (2003): Post-cognitivist HCI: second-wave theories. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Extended abstracts of the 2003 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems - CHI 2003 April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 692-693

 Cited in the following chapter:

Activity Theory: [/encyclopedia/activity_theory.html]


 
2000
 
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Hollan, James D., Hutchins, Edwin and Kirsh, David (2000): Distributed Cognition: Toward a New Foundation for Human-Computer Interaction Research. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 7 (2) pp. 174-196.

We are quickly passing through the historical moment when people work in front of a single computer, dominated by a small CRT and focused on tasks involving only local information. Networked computers are becoming ubiquitous and are playing increasingly significant roles in our lives and in the basic infrastructures of science, business, and social interaction. For human-computer interaction to advance in the new millennium we need to better understand the emerging dynamic of interaction in which the focus task is no longer confined to the desktop but reaches into a complex networked world of information and computer-mediated interactions. We think the theory of distributed cognition has a special role to play in understanding interactions between people and technologies, for its focus has always been on whole environments: what we really do in them and how we coordinate our activity in them. Distributed cognition provides a radical reorientation of how to think about designing and supporting human-computer interaction. As a theory it is specifically tailored to understanding interactions among people and technologies. In this article we propose distributed cognition as a new foundation for human-computer interaction, sketch an integrated research framework, and use selections from our earlier work to suggest how this framework can provide new opportunities in the design of digital work materials.

© All rights reserved Hollan et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapters:

Activity Theory: [/encyclopedia/activity_theory.html]

Semi-structured qualitative studies: [/encyclopedia/semi-structured_qualitative_studies.html]


 
 
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Hollan, James D. and Stornetta, Scott (2000): Asynchronous Negotiated Access. In: Proceedings of the HCI00 Conference on People and Computers XIV 2000. pp. 17-26.

1998
 
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Hightower, Ron R., Ring, Laura T., Helfman, J. I., Bederson, Benjamin B. and Hollan, James D. (1998): PadPrints: Graphical Multiscale Web Histories. In: Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the 11th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 01 - 04, 1998, San Francisco, California, United States. pp. 121-122.

We have implemented a browser companion called PadPrints that dynamically builds a graphical history-map of visited web pages. PadPrints relies on Pad++, a zooming user interface (ZUI) development substrate, to display the history-map. PadPrints functions in conjunction with a traditional web browser but without requiring any browser modifications.

© All rights reserved Hightower et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hightower, Ron R., Ring, Laura T., Helfman, J. I., Bederson, Benjamin B. and Hollan, James D. (1998): Graphical Multiscale Web Histories: A Study of PadPrints. In: Hypertext 98 - Proceedings of the Ninth ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia June 20-24, 1998, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. pp. 58-65.

We have implemented a browser companion called PadPrints that dynamically builds a graphical history-map of visited web pages. PadPrints relies on Pad++, a zooming user interface (ZUI) development substrate, to display the history-map using minimal screen space. PadPrints functions in conjunction with a traditional web browser but without requiring any browser modifications. We performed two usability studies of PadPrints. The first addressed general navigation effectiveness. The second focused on history-related aspects of navigation. In tasks requiring returns to prior pages, users of PadPrints completed tasks in 61.2% of the time required by users of the same browser without PadPrints. We also observed significant decreases in the number of pages accessed when using PadPrints. Users found browsing with PadPrints more satisfying than using Netscape alone.

© All rights reserved Hightower et al. and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Druin, Allison, Stewart, Jason, Proft, David, Bederson, Benjamin B. and Hollan, James D. (1997): KidPad: A Design Collaboration Between Children, Technologists, and Educators. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 463-470.

We established an interdisciplinary, intergenerational collaboration in the fall of 1995, between the University of New Mexico's Computer Science Department, the College of Education, and local Albuquerque elementary school children. The goal of this research was to develop an expressive digital medium with an intuitive zooming interface, to support a learning environment for children. In the process of this collaboration, design methodologies that support a child's role in the development of new technologies were explored. What follows is a summary of our iterative design experience, collaboration, and the results of the research to date.

© All rights reserved Druin et al. and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Bederson, Benjamin B., Hollan, James D., Druin, Allison, Stewart, Jason, Rogers, David and Proft, David (1996): Local Tools: An Alternative to Tool Palettes. In: Kurlander, David, Brown, Marc and Rao, Ramana (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 1996, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 169-170.

We describe local tools, a general interaction technique that replaces traditional tool palettes. A collection of tools sit on the worksurface along with the data. Each tool can be picked up (where it replaces the cursor), used, and then put down anywhere on the worksurface. There is a toolbox for organizing the tools. These local tools were implemented in Pad++ as part of KidPad, an application for children.

© All rights reserved Bederson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bederson, Benjamin B., Hollan, James D., Perlin, Ken, Meyer, Jonathan, Bacon, David and Furnas, George W. (1996): Pad++: A Zoomable Graphical Sketchpad For Exploring Alternate Interface Physics. In J. Vis. Lang. Comput., 7 (1) pp. 3-32

1994
 
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Bederson, Benjamin B. and Hollan, James D. (1994): Pad++: A Zooming Graphical Interface for Exploring Alternate Interface Physics. In: Szekely, Pedro (ed.) Proceedings of the 7th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 02 - 04, 1994, Marina del Rey, California, United States. pp. 17-26.

 
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Bederson, Benjamin B. and Hollan, James D. (1994): Pad++: A Zooming Graphical Interface for Exploring Alternate Interface Physics. In: Szekely, Pedro (ed.) Proceedings of the 7th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 02 - 04, 1994, Marina del Rey, California, United States. pp. 17-26.

We describe the current status of Pad++, a zooming graphical interface that we are exploring as an alternative to traditional window and icon-based approaches to interface design. We discuss the motivation for Pad++, describe the implementation, and present prototype applications. In addition, we introduce an informational physics strategy for interface design and briefly compare it with metaphor-based design strategies.

© All rights reserved Bederson and Hollan and/or ACM Press

 
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Bederson, Benjamin B., Stead, Larry and Hollan, James D. (1994): Pad++: Advances in Multiscale Interfaces. In: Szekely, Pedro (ed.) Proceedings of the 7th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 02 - 04, 1994, Marina del Rey, California, United States. pp. --.

 
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Hill, William C. and Hollan, James D. (1994): History-Enriched Digital Objects: Prototypes and Policy Issues. In The Information Society, 10 (2) .

1992
 
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Hill, Will, Hollan, James D., Wroblewski, Dave and McCandless, Tim (1992): Edit Wear and Read Wear. In: Bauersfeld, Penny, Bennett, John and Lynch, Gene (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 92 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 3-7, 1992, Monterey, California. pp. 3-9.

We describe two applications that illustrate the idea of computational wear in the domain of document processing. By graphically depicting the history of author and reader interactions with documents, these applications offer otherwise unavailable information to guide work. We discuss how their design accords with a theory of professional work and an informational physics perspective on interface design.

© All rights reserved Hill et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hollan, James D. and Stornetta, Scott (1992): Beyond Being There. In: Bauersfeld, Penny, Bennett, John and Lynch, Gene (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 92 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 3-7, 1992, Monterey, California. pp. 119-125.

A belief in the efficacy of imitating face-to-face communication is an unquestioned presupposition of most current work on supporting communications in electronic media. In this paper we highlight problems with this presupposition and present an alternative proposal for grounding and motivating research and development that frames the issue in terms of needs, media, and mechanisms. To help elaborate the proposal we sketch a series of example projects and respond to potential criticisms.

© All rights reserved Hollan and Stornetta and/or ACM Press

 
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Hill, William C. and Hollan, James D. (1992): Pointing and Visualization. In: Bauersfeld, Penny, Bennett, John and Lynch, Gene (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 92 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 3-7, 1992, Monterey, California. pp. 665-666.

The nature of visualizations and the social uses to which they are put rely heavily on pointing behavior. In the context of a switched telephone network visualization, this tape illustrates novel task-specific pointing facilities.

© All rights reserved Hill and Hollan and/or ACM Press

 
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Brothers, L., Hollan, James D., Nielsen, Jakob, Stornetta, Scott, Abney, Steve, Furnas, George W. and Littman, Michael (1992): Supporting Informal Communication via Ephemeral Interest Groups. In: Proceedings of the 1992 ACM conference on Computer-supported cooperative work November 01 - 04, 1992, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pp. 84-90.

In this paper, we introduce ephemeral interest groups for supporting informal communication. Ephemeral interest groups are electronic discussion groups that, in contrast to bulletin boards and the like, are short-lived and ad hoc. They are designed as a medium for informal discussions of items broadcast to a wider community. We have implemented a prototype system to explore ephemeral interest groups. We discuss the goals of the system, characterize its evolution over the last ten months of deployment, and sketch our plans for future developments.

© All rights reserved Brothers et al. and/or ACM Press

1991
 
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Curtis, Bill, Kuntz, Roy, Curtis, Bill, Hollan, James D., Mountford, S. Joy and Collier, George (1991): Retrospective on the MCC Human Interface Laboratory. In: Robertson, Scott P., Olson, Gary M. and Olson, Judith S. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 91 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 28 - June 5, 1991, New Orleans, Louisiana. pp. 373-376.

On July 27, 1990 the participants in MCC's Advanced Computer Technology Program decided to terminate MCC's Human Interface Laboratory. This panel will present the technical and organizational lessons learned in the rise and fall of MCC's Human Interface Laboratory.

© All rights reserved Curtis et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hill, William C. and Hollan, James D. (1991): Deixis and the Future of Visualization Excellence. In: IEEE Visualization 1991 1991. pp. 314-320.

1989
 
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Hollan, James D. and Curtis, Bill (1989): CHI Research at MCC. In: Bice, Ken and Lewis, Clayton H. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 89 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 30 - June 4, 1989, Austin, Texas. pp. 147-149.

1986
 
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Hutchins, Edwin, Hollan, James D. and Norman, Donald A. (1986): Direct Manipulation Interfaces. In: Norman, Donald A. and Draper, Stephen W. (eds.). "User Centered System Design: New Perspectives on Human-Computer Interaction". Hillsdale, NJ: Lawrence Erlbaum Associatespp. 87-124

1985
 
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Hutchins, Edwin, Hollan, James D. and Norman, Donald A. (1985): Direct Manipulation Interfaces. In Human-Computer Interaction, 1 (4) pp. 311-338.

Direct manipulation has been lauded as a good form of interface design, and some interfaces that have this property have been well received by users. In this article we seek a cognitive account of both the advantages and disadvantages of direct manipulation interfaces. We identify two underlying phenomena that give rise to the feeling of directness. One deals with the information processing distance between the user's intentions and the facilities provided by the machine. Reduction of this distance makes the interface feel direct by reducing the effort required of the user to accomplish goals. The second phenomenon concerns the relation between the input and output vocabularies of the interface language. In particular, direct manipulation requires that the system provide representations of objects that behave as if they are the objects themselves. This provides the feeling of directness of manipulation.

© All rights reserved Hutchins et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

Card, Stuart K. and Hollan, James D. (2013): Information Visualization. In: Soegaard, Mads and Dam, Rikke Friis (eds.). "The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.". Aarhus, Denmark: The Interaction Design Foundation. Available online at https://www.interaction-design.org/encyclopedia/information_visualization.html

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/james_d__hollan.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:-2012
Pub. count:49
Number of co-authors:67



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Benjamin B. Bederson:8
Anne Marie Piper:8
Nadir Weibel:8

 

 

Productive colleagues

James D. Hollan's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

John M. Carroll:209
Scott E. Hudson:113
Jakob Nielsen:109
 
 
 

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