Publication statistics

Pub. period:1992-2008
Pub. count:25
Number of co-authors:45



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Scott E. Hudson:6
James A. Landay:5
Sunny Consolvo:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Ian Smith's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gregory D. Abowd:116
Scott E. Hudson:113
Paul Dourish:95
 
 
 

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Ian Smith

 

Publications by Ian Smith (bibliography)

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2008
 
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Consolvo, Sunny, McDonald, David W., Toscos, Tammy, Chen, Mike Y., Froehlich, Jon, Harrison, Beverly L., Klasnja, Predrag, LaMarca, Anthony, LeGrand, Louis, Libby, Ryan, Smith, Ian and Landay, James A. (2008): Activity sensing in the wild: a field trial of ubifit garden. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1797-1806. Available online

Recent advances in small inexpensive sensors, low-power processing, and activity modeling have enabled applications that use on-body sensing and machine learning to infer people's activities throughout everyday life. To address the growing rate of sedentary lifestyles, we have developed a system, UbiFit Garden, which uses these technologies and a personal, mobile display to encourage physical activity. We conducted a 3-week field trial in which 12 participants used the system and report findings focusing on their experiences with the sensing and activity inference. We discuss key implications for systems that use on-body sensing and activity inference to encourage physical activity.

© All rights reserved Consolvo et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Consolvo, Sunny, McDonald, David W., Toscos, Tammy, Chen, Mike Y., Froehlich, Jon, Harrison, Beverly, Klasnja, Predrag, LaMarca, Anthony, LeGrand, Louis, Libby, Ryan, Smith, Ian and Landay, James A. (2008): Activity Sensing in the Wild: A Field Trial of UbiFit Garden. In , . Available online

Recent advances in small inexpensive sensors, low-power processing, and activity modeling have enabled applications that use on-body sensing and machine learning to infer people’s activities throughout everyday life. To address the growing rate of sedentary lifestyles, we have developed a system, UbiFit Garden, which uses these technologies and a personal, mobile display to encourage physical activity. We conducted a 3-week field trial in which 12 participants used the system and report findings focusing on their experiences with the sensing and activity inference. We discuss key implications for systems that use on-body sensing and activity inference to encourage physical activity.

© All rights reserved Consolvo et al. and/or their publisher

2007
 
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Consolvo, Sunny, Harrison, Beverly L., Smith, Ian, Chen, Mike Y., Everitt, Katherine, Froehlich, Jon and Landay, James A. (2007): Conducting In Situ Evaluations for and With Ubiquitous Computing Technologies. In International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 22 (1) pp. 103-118. Available online

To evaluate ubiquitous computing technologies, which may be embedded in the environment, embedded in objects, worn, or carried by the user throughout everyday life, it is essential to use methods that accommodate the often unpredictable, real-world environments in which the technologies are used. This article discusses how we have adapted and applied traditional methods from psychology and human-computer interaction, such as Wizard of Oz and Experience Sampling, to be more amenable to the in situ evaluations of ubiquitous computing applications, particularly in the early stages of design. The way that ubiquitous computing technologies can facilitate the in situ collection of self-report data is also discussed. Although the focus is on ubiquitous computing applications and tools for their assessment, it is believed that the in situ evaluation tools that are proposed will be generally useful for field trials of other technology, applications, or formative studies that are concerned with collecting data in situ.

© All rights reserved Consolvo et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 
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Paulos, Eric, Smith, Ian and Hooker, Ben (2007): Urban Score: Measuring Your Relationship with the City. In: Hazlewood, William R., Coyle, Lorcan and Consolvo, Sunny (eds.) Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Ambient Information Systems - Colocated at Pervasive 2007 May 13, 2007, Toronto, Canada. . Available online

2006
 
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Consolvo, Sunny, Everitt, Katherine, Smith, Ian and Landay, James A. (2006): Design requirements for technologies that encourage physical activity. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 457-466. Available online

Overweight and obesity are a global epidemic, with over one billion overweight adults worldwide (300+ million of whom are obese). Obesity is linked to several serious health problems and medical conditions. Medical experts agree that physical activity is critical to maintaining fitness, reducing weight, and improving health, yet many people have difficulty increasing and maintaining physical activity in everyday life. Clinical studies have shown that health benefits can occur from simply increasing the number of steps one takes each day and that social support can motivate people to stay active. In this paper, we describe Houston, a prototype mobile phone application for encouraging activity by sharing step count with friends. We also present four design requirements for technologies that encourage physical activity that we derived from a three-week long in situ pilot study that was conducted with women who wanted to increase their physical activity.

© All rights reserved Consolvo et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Patel, Kayur, Chen, Mike Y., Smith, Ian and Landay, James A. (2006): Personalizing routes. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2006. pp. 187-190. Available online

Navigation services (e.g., in-car navigation systems and online mapping sites) compute routes between two locations to help users navigate. However, these routes may direct users along an unfamiliar path when a familiar path exists, or, conversely, may include redundant information that the user already knows. These overly complicated directions increase the cognitive load of the user, which may lead to a dangerous driving environment. Since the level of detail is user specific and depends on their familiarity with a region, routes need to be personalized. We have developed a system, called MyRoute, that reduces route complexity by creating user specific routes based on a priori knowledge of familiar routes and landmarks. MyRoute works by compressing well known steps into a single contextualized step and rerouting users along familiar routes.

© All rights reserved Patel et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Reilly, Derek F., Dearman, David, Ha, Vicki, Smith, Ian and Inkpen, Kori (2006): "Need to Know": Examining Information Need in Location Discourse. In: Fishkin, Kenneth P., Schiele, Bernt, Nixon, Paddy and Quigley, Aaron J. (eds.) PERVASIVE 2006 - Pervasive Computing 4th International Conference May 7-10, 2006, Dublin, Ireland. pp. 33-49. Available online

2005
 
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Hudson, Scott E., Mankoff, Jennifer and Smith, Ian (2005): Extensible input handling in the subArctic toolkit. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 381-390. Available online

The subArctic user interface toolkit has extensibility as one of its central goals. It seeks not only to supply a powerful library of reusable interactive objects, but also make it easy to create new, unusual, and highly customized interactions tailored to the needs of particular interfaces or task domains. A central part of this extensibility is the input model used by the toolkit. The subArctic input model provides standard reusable components that implement many typical input handling patterns for the programmer, allows inputs to be handled in very flexible ways, and allows the details of how inputs are handled to be modified to meet custom needs. This paper will consider the structure and operation of the subArctic input handling mechanism. It will demonstrate the flexibility of the system through a series of examples, illustrating techniques that it enables - many of which would be very difficult to implement in most toolkits.

© All rights reserved Hudson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bellotti, Victoria, Ducheneaut, Nicolas, Howard, Mark, Smith, Ian and Grinter, Rebecca E. (2005): Quality Versus Quantity: E-Mail-Centric Task Management and Its Relation With Overload. In Human-Computer Interaction, 20 (1) pp. 89-138. Available online

It is widely acknowledged that many professionals suffer from "e-mail overload." This article presents findings from in-depth fieldwork that examined this phenomenon, uncovering six key challenges of task management in e-mail. Analysis of qualitative and quantitative data suggests that it is not simply the quantity but also the collaborative quality of e-mail task and project management that causes this overload. We describe how e-mail becomes especially overwhelming when people use it for tasks that involve participation of others; tasks cannot be completed until a response is obtained and so they are interleaved. Interleaving means that the e-mail user must somehow simultaneously keep track of multiple incomplete tasks, often with the only reminder for each one being an e-mail message somewhere in the inbox or a folder. This and other insights from our fieldwork led us to a new design philosophy for e-mail in which resources for task and project management are embedded directly within an e-mail client as opposed to being added on as separate components of the application. A client, TaskMaster, embodying these ideas, was developed and tested by users in managing their real e-mail over an extended period. The design of the client and results of its evaluation are also reported.

© All rights reserved Bellotti et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Iachello, Giovanni, Smith, Ian, Consolvo, Sunny, Chen, Mike and Abowd, Gregory D. (2005): Developing privacy guidelines for social location disclosure applications and services. In: Proceedings of the 2005 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2005. pp. 65-76. Available online

In this article, we describe the design process of Reno, a location-enhanced, mobile coordination tool and person finder. The design process included three field experiments: a formative Experience Sampling Method (ESM) study, a pilot deployment and an extended user study. These studies were targeted at the significant personal security, privacy and data protection concerns caused by this application. We distill this experience into a small set of guidelines for designers of social mobile applications and show how these guidelines can be applied to a different application, called Boise. These guidelines cover issues pertaining to personal boundary definition, control, deception and denial, and group vs. individual communication. We also report on lessons learned from our evaluation experience, which might help practitioners in designing novel mobile applications, including the choice and characterization of users for testing security and privacy features of designs, the length of learning curves and their effect on evaluation and the impact of peculiar deployment circumstances on the results of these finely tuned user studies.

© All rights reserved Iachello et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Smith, Ian (2005): Social-Mobile Applications. In IEEE Computer, 38 (4) pp. 84-85. Available online

2003
 
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Bellotti, Victoria, Ducheneaut, Nicolas, Howard, Mark and Smith, Ian (2003): Taking email to task: the design and evaluation of a task management centered email tool. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 345-352.

2002
 
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Bellotti, Victoria, Ducheneaut, Nicolas, Howard, Mark, Neuwirth, Christine, Smith, Ian and Smith, Trevor (2002): FLANNEL: adding computation to electronic mail during transmission. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (ed.) Proceedings of the 15th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 27-30, 2002, Paris, France. pp. 1-10. Available online

In this paper, we describe FLANNEL, an architecture for adding computational capabilities to email. FLANNEL allows email to be modified by an application while in transit between sender and receiver. This modification is done without modification to the endpoints -- mail clients -- at either end. This paper also describes interaction techniques that we have developed to allow senders of email to quickly and easily select computations to be performed by FLANNEL. Through, our experience, we explain the properties that applications must have in order to be successful in the context of FLANNEL.

© All rights reserved Bellotti et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bellotti, Victoria, Ducheneaut, Nicolas, Howard, Mark, Smith, Ian and Neuwirth, Christine (2002): Innovation in extremis: evolving an application for the critical work of email and information management. In: Proceedings of DIS02: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2002. pp. 181-192. Available online

We describe our experience of trying to develop a novel application that transforms information management (both coordination-based and personal) from stand-alone resources into resources deeply embedded in email. We explored two models for accomplishing this goal; these were to embed these resources in the email channel and to embed them in the client. Our exploration of the first model was intensive, in-depth and ultimately unsuccessful in large part due to our design process. We adopted Extreme Programming (XP) as a means to explore our second model more efficiently. This paper describes our motivations and experiences while exploring our first model before XP and then the advantages and disadvantages of turning to XP in the exploration of our second model.

© All rights reserved Bellotti et al. and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Bellotti, Victoria and Smith, Ian (2000): Informing the Design of an Information Management System with Iterative Fieldwork. In: Proceedings of DIS00: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2000. pp. 227-237. Available online

We report on the design process of a personal information management system, Raton Laveur, and how it was influenced by an intimate relationship between iterative fieldwork and design thinking. Initially, the system was conceived as a paper-based UI to calendar, contacts, to-dos and notes. As the fieldwork progressed, our understanding of peoples practices and the constraints of their office infrastructures radically shifted our design goals away from paper-based interaction to embedded interaction with our system. By this we mean embedding information management functionality in an existing application such as email.

© All rights reserved Bellotti and Smith and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Kaminsky, Michael, Dourish, Paul, Edwards, W. Keith, LaMarca, Anthony, Salisbury, Michael and Smith, Ian (1999): SWEETPEA: Software Tools for Programmable Embodied Agents. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 144-151. Available online

Programmable Embodied Agents are portable, wireless, interactive devices embodying specific, differentiable, interactive characteristics. They take the form of identifiable characters who reside in the physical world and interact directly with users. They can act as an out-of-band communication channel between users, as proxies for system components or other users, or in a variety of other roles. Traditionally, research into such devices has been based on costly custom hardware. In this paper, we report on our explorations of the space of physical character-based interfaces built on recently available stock consumer hardware platforms, structured around an initial framework of applications.

© All rights reserved Kaminsky et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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LaMarca, Anthony, Edwards, W. Keith, Dourish, Paul, Lamping, John, Smith, Ian and Thornton, Jim (1999): Taking the work out of workflow: Mechanisms for document-centered collaboration. In: Boedker, Susanne, Kyng, Morten and Schmidt, Kjeld (eds.) ECSCW 99 - Proceedings of the Sixth European Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work 12-16 September, 1999, Copenhagen, Denmark. p. 1.

1997
 
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Edwards, W. Keith, Hudson, Scott E., Marinacci, Joshua, Rodenstein, Roy, Rodriguez, Thomas K. and Smith, Ian (1997): Systematic Output Modification in a 2D User Interface Toolkit. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 151-158. Available online

In this paper we present a simple but general set of techniques for modifying output in a 2D user interface toolkit. We use a combination of simple subclassing, wrapping, and collusion between parent and output objects to produce arbitrary sets of composable output transformations. The techniques described here allow rich output effects to be added to most, if not all, existing interactors in an application, without the knowledge of the interactors themselves. This paper explains how the approach works, discusses a number of example effects that have been built, and describes how the techniques presented here could be extended to work with other toolkits. We address issues of input by examining a number of extensions to the toolkit input subsystem to accommodate transformed graphical output. Our approach uses a set of "hooks" to undo output transformations when input is to be dispatched.

© All rights reserved Edwards et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hudson, Scott E. and Smith, Ian (1997): Supporting Dynamic Downloadable Appearances in an Extensible User Interface Toolkit. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 159-168. Available online

Most consumer products, from automobiles to breakfast cereals, pay significant attention to the visual appearance they present to the consumer. Designers of these products normally create custom appearances that reflect things such as the functionality or purpose of the product, the market they are trying to reach, and the image that the company creating the product is trying to create. As graphical user interfaces begin to fully penetrate the consumer market, we expect that similar customization of appearance will and should become part of every day practice in user interface design as well. This paper describes new user interface toolkit techniques designed to support dynamic, even downloadable, appearance changes for graphical user interfaces. The long term goal of this work is to create a system of styles which is analogous to current systems of fonts. That is, to provide a system for applying a style of visual appearance to an interface independent of the content of the interface, and for allowing such styles to be developed at least partially independent of specific user interface components, even in many cases supporting custom interactive components that did not exist when a style was created.

© All rights reserved Hudson and Smith and/or ACM Press

 
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Hudson, Scott E., Rodenstein, Roy and Smith, Ian (1997): Debugging Lenses: A New Class of Transparent Tools for User Interface Debugging. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 179-187. Available online

The visual and event driven nature of modern user interfaces, while a boon to users, can also make them more difficult to debug than conventional programs. This is because only the very surface representation of interactive objects -- their final visual appearance -- is visible to the programmer on the screen. The remaining "programming details" of the object remain hidden. If the appearance or behavior of an object is incorrect, often few clues are visible to indicate the cause. One must usually turn to text oriented debugging techniques (debuggers or simply print statements) which are separate from the interface, and often cumbersome to use with event-driven control flow. This paper describes a new class of techniques designed to aid in the debugging of user interfaces by making more of the invisible, visible. This class of techniques: debugging lenses, makes use of transparent lens interaction techniques to show debugging information. It is designed to work in situ -- in the context of a running interface without stopping or interfering with that interface. This paper describes and motivates the class of techniques, gives a number of specific examples of debugging lenses, and describes their implementation in the subArctic user interface toolkit.

© All rights reserved Hudson et al. and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Hudson, Scott E. and Smith, Ian (1996): Techniques for Addressing Fundamental Privacy and Disruption Tradeoffs in Awareness Support Systems. In: Olson, Gary M., Olson, Judith S. and Ackerman, Mark S. (eds.) Proceedings of the 1996 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 1996, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. pp. 248-257. Available online

This paper describes a fundamental dual tradeoff that occurs in systems supporting awareness for distributed work groups, and presents several specific new techniques which illustrate good compromise points within this tradeoff space. This dual tradeoff is between privacy and awareness, and between awareness and disturbance. Simply stated, the more information about oneself that leaves your work area, the more potential for awareness of you exists for your colleagues. Unfortunately, this also represents the greatest potential for intrusion on your privacy. Similarly, the more information that is received about the activities of colleagues, the more potential awareness we have of them. However, at the same time, the more information we receive, the greater the chance that the information will become a disturbance to our normal work. This dual tradeoff seems to be a fundamental one. However, by carefully examining awareness problems in the light of this tradeoff it is possible to devise techniques which expose new points in the design space. These new points provide different types and quantities of information so that awareness can be achieved without invading the privacy of the sender, or creating a disturbance for the receiver. This paper presents four such techniques, each based on a careful selection of the information transmitted.

© All rights reserved Hudson and Smith and/or ACM Press

 
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Hudson, Scott E. and Smith, Ian (1996): Ultra-Lightweight Constraints. In: Kurlander, David, Brown, Marc and Rao, Ramana (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 1996, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 147-155. Available online

Constraint systems have been used for some time to implement various components of a user interface. High level support for flexible screen layout has been among the more important uses; layout constraints in a user interface toolkit provide a declarative mechanism for controlling the size and position of objects in an interactive display, along with an efficient update mechanism for maintaining display layouts automatically in the face of dynamic changes. This paper describes a new technique for implementing one-way layout constraints which overcomes a substantial limitation of previous systems. In particular, it allows constraints to be implemented in an extremely small amount of space -- as little as 17 bits per constraint -- and still maintain the level of performance needed for good interactive response. These ultra-lightweight constraints, while not handling all cases, cover most relationships used for layout, and allow conventional constraints to be applied when needed. This paper will consider both a general technique for ultra-lightweight layout constraints and its specific implementation in a new Java-based user interface toolkit.

© All rights reserved Hudson and Smith and/or ACM Press

 
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Sawhney, Nitin, Balcom, David and Smith, Ian (1996): HyperCafe: Narrative and Aesthetic Properties of Hypervideo. In: Hypertext 96 - Proceedings of the Seventh ACM Conference on Hypertext March 16-20, 1996, Washington, DC. pp. 1-10. Available online

HyperCafe is an experimental hypermedia prototype, developed as an illustration of a general hypervideo system. This program places the user in a virtual cafe, composed primarily of digital video clips of actors involved in fictional conversations in the cafe; HyperCafe allows the user to follow different conversations, and offers dynamic opportunities of interaction via temporal, spatio-temporal and textual links to present alternative narratives. Textual elements are also present in the form of explanatory text, contradictory subtitles, and intruding narratives. Based on our work with HyperCafe, we discuss the components and a framework for hypervideo structures, along with the underlying aesthetic considerations.

© All rights reserved Sawhney et al. and/or ACM Press

1993
 
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Lawton, Daryl T. and Smith, Ian (1993): The Knowledge Weasel Hypermedia Annotation System. In: Stotts, P. David and Furuta, Richard (eds.) Proceedings of ACM Hypertext 93 Conference November 14-18, 1993, Seattle, Washington. pp. 106-117. Available online

We describe the organization and implementation of the Knowledge Weasel (KW) Hypermedia Annotation System which we are using to explore knowledge structuring by collaborative annotation. Knowledge Weasel incorporates many useful features: a common record format for representing annotations in different media for uniform access; dynamic user control of the presentation of annotations as a navigational aid; global navigation using queries and local navigation using link following; support for collecting related sets of annotations into groups for contextual reference and communication. KW purposely leverages off of free, publicly available software so it doesn't require building specialized tools and also so it can be freely available. We discuss some of the issues involved with annotating non-textual material such as images and sound and conclude with a brief discussion of ongoing and future work.

© All rights reserved Lawton and Smith and/or ACM Press

1992
 
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Wilcox, Lynn D., Smith, Ian and Bush, Marcia (1992): Wordspotting for Voice Editing and Audio Indexing. In: Bauersfeld, Penny, Bennett, John and Lynch, Gene (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 92 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 3-7, 1992, Monterey, California. pp. 655-656. Available online

 
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