Publication statistics

Pub. period:1990-2012
Pub. count:42
Number of co-authors:47



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Leo Ferres:4
Steve Howard:3
Cathy Dudek:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Gitte Lindgaard's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Steve Howard:57
Susan M. Dray:51
Robert Biddle:48
 
 
 

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Gitte Lindgaard

Picture of Gitte Lindgaard.
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Has also published under the name of:
"G. Lindgaard"

Personal Homepage:
http-server.carleton.ca/~glindgaa/

Gitte Lindgaard, PhD, is a Distinguished Research Professor at Carleton University in Ottawa, Canada, and a Professor of Neuroaffective Design at Swinburne University of Technology in Melbourne, Australia. Until recently, she was Director of the Human Oriented Technology Lab (HOTLab) holding the prestigious Canadian Natural Science & Engineering Research Council's NSERC/Cognos Senior Industry Research Chair in User-Centred Product Design. Prior to that, she was Principal Scientist and Head of the Human Factors Team at Telstra Research Laboratories, Australia for 15 years. She was Chair of CHISIG of the Ergonomics Society of Australia (ESA) (1986-1992; 1998-2000) where she founded the OZCHI conference in 1986. She is a Fellow of the HF&ESA, the deputy editor of Interacting with Computers, and associate editor of several international HCI journals such as the International Journal of Human-Computer Studies and The International Journal of Mobile HCI. Her research interests include aesthetics, cognition, and emotion in computing, and human decision making, especially in diagnostic medicine. She has published over 200 refereed papers, books, and book chapters.

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Publications by Gitte Lindgaard (bibliography)

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2012

Lindgaard, Gitte (2012). Commentary on 'Visual Aesthetics' by Noam Tractinsky

 
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Brown, Judith M., Lindgaard, Gitte and Biddle, Robert (2012): Interactional identity: designers and developers making joint work meaningful and effective. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 1381-1390.

We studied collaborating interface designers and software developers engaged in multidisciplinary software creation work. Twenty-one designers and developers in 8 organizations were interviewed to understand how each specialist viewed team interactions. We also shadowed most participants as they worked on novel software projects with user interface design challenges. A grounded theory analysis of interview transcripts showed that designers and developers construct unique identities in the process of collaborating that provide meaning to their artefact-mediated interactions, and that help them to effectively accomplish the work of creating novel software. Our model of interactional identities specifies a number of aspects of joint project work in which an interactional identity is expressed. We suggest these identities are constructed to bridge a gap between how designers and developers were taught to enact their roles and the demands of project-specific work.

© All rights reserved Brown et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte, Dudek, Cathy, Sen, Devjani, Sumegi, Livia and Noonan, Patrick (2011): An exploration of relations between visual appeal, trustworthiness and perceived usability of homepages. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction (TOCHI), 18 (1) .

Extremely high correlations between repeated judgments of visual appeal of homepages shown for 50 milliseconds have been interpreted as evidence for a mere exposure effect [Lindgaard et al. 2006]. Continuing that work, the present research had two objectives. First, it investigated the relationship between judgments differing in cognitive demands. Second, it began to identify specific visual attributes that appear to contribute to different judgments. Three experiments are reported. All used the stimuli and viewing time as before. Using a paradigm known to disrupt processing beyond the stimulus offset, Experiment 1 was designed to ensure that the previous findings could not be attributed to such continued processing. Adopting a within-subject design, Experiment 2 investigated the extent to which judgments differing in cognitive demands (visual appeal, perceived usability, trustworthiness) may be driven by the visual characteristics of a Web page. It also enabled analyses of visual attributes that contributed most to the different judgments. Experiment 3 replicated Experiment 2 but using a between-subject design to ensure that no practice effect could occur. The results suggest that all three types of judgments are largely driven by visual appeal, but that cognitively demanding judgments are processed in a qualitatively different manner than visual appeal, and that they rely on somewhat different visual attributes. A model accounting for the results is provided.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]


 
2010
 
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Buie, Elizabeth, Dray, Susan M., Instone, Keith, Jain, Jhilmil, Lindgaard, Gitte and Lund, Arnie (2010): How to bring HCI research and practice closer together. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3181-3184.

This special interest group probes potential problems between HCI researchers and the practitioners who are consumers of research, to explore the extent of the problems and propose possible solutions. It will start with the results of the CHI 2010 workshop on the same topic, articulating factors that may render some of the research literature inaccessible or irrelevant to practitioners. When should HCI researchers be concerned about the relevance of their work to practitioners? How should practitioners communicate their needs for research? Participants will discuss these topics and others that both groups can use to help bridge the gap between research and practice in HCI.

© All rights reserved Buie et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Buie, Elizabeth A., Dray, Susan M., Instone, Keith E., Jain, Jhilmil, Lindgaard, Gitte and Lund, Arnold M. (2010): Researcher-practitioner interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4469-4472.

This workshop explores whether problems exist between HCI researchers and the practitioners who are consumers of research -- and, if so, will endeavor to identify the dimensions of the problems and propose possible solutions. On the one hand, the workshop aims to articulate factors that may render the research literature inaccessible or irrelevant to practitioners and to suggest potential improvements. On the other hand, the workshop also aims to learn from researchers how their research could benefit from practitioner input.

© All rights reserved Buie et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Ferres, Leo, Lindgaard, Gitte and Sumegi, Livia (2010): Evaluating a tool for improving accessibility to charts and graphs. In: Twelfth Annual ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Assistive Technologies 2010. pp. 83-90.

We discuss factors in the design and evaluation of natural language-driven assistive technologies that generate descriptions of, and allow interaction with, graphical representations of numerical data. In particular, we provide data in favor of 1) screen-reading technologies as a usable, useful, and cost-effective means of interacting with graphs. The data also show that by carrying out evaluation of Assistive Technologies on populations other than the target communities, certain subtleties of navigation and interaction may be lost or distorted.

© All rights reserved Ferres et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Day, Donald, Lindgaard, Gitte and Noyes, Jan (2009): In Memoriam Brian Shackel 1927-2007. In Interacting with Computers, 21 (5) p. 324.

 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (2009): Early traces of usability as a science and as a profession. In Interacting with Computers, 21 (5) pp. 350-352.

Shackel's paper [Shackel, B., 1991. Usability -- context, framework, definition, design and evaluation. In: Shackel, B., Richardson, S. (Eds.), Human Factors for Informatics Usability. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge, UK] is reviewed in an attempt to assess his contribution to the development of usability as a science and as a profession. Usability related research is first situated in the period around 1990. The contributions to usability as a science then are addressed via Professor Shackel's definition and evaluation of usability. Finally, his contribution toward usability as a profession is acknowledged via his view of usability in the light of wider business goals.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Lindgaard, Gitte and Narasimhan, Sheila (2009): Mobile HCI: Thinking Beyond the Screen-Keyboard-Mouse Interaction Paradigm. In International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, 1 (3) pp. 46-60.

In this position article we argue that it is time for the mobile HCI community to think beyond the traditional screen-keyboard-mouse paradigm and explore the many possibilities that mobility, mobile platforms, and people on the move offer. We present a collection of ideas aiming to encourage HCI researchers to explore how up-and-coming mobile technologies can inspire new interaction models, alternative I/O methods, and data collection methods. The range of possible applications designed to make life easier for specified user populations is limited, we maintain, only by our imagination to understand novel problem spaces, to mix, match and expand on existing methods as well as to invent, test, and validate new methods. We present several case studies in an attempt to demonstrate such possibilities for future mobile HCI.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard and Narasimhan and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Chattratichart, Jarinee and Lindgaard, Gitte (2008): A comparative evaluation of heuristic-based usability inspection methods. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2213-2220.

Given that heuristic evaluation (HE) is a popular evaluation method among practitioners despite criticisms surrounding its performance and reliability, there is a need to improve the method's performance. Several studies have shown HE-Plus, an emerging variant of HE, to outperform HE in both effectiveness and reliability. HE-Plus uses the same set of heuristics as HE; the only difference between these two methods is the 'usability problems profile' element in HE-Plus. This paper reports our attempt to verify the original profile employed in HE-Plus based on usability problem classification in the User Action Framework and an experiment evaluating its outcome by comparing HE with two HE variants using a profile (HE-Plus and HE++) and a control group. Our results confirmed the role of the 'usability problems profiles' on improving the performance and reliability of heuristic evaluation: both HE-Plus and HE++ outperformed HE in terms of effectiveness as well as reliability.

© All rights reserved Chattratichart and Lindgaard and/or ACM Press

 
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Lindgaard, Gitte and Narasimhan, S. (2008): Factors influencing feature usage in work-related communication. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 27 (2) pp. 153-168.

Two studies are presented. The first aimed to identify possible barriers to the uptake and use of commonly available telephony features and to determine whether greater knowledge of features/access codes and availability of user manuals could increase feature usage under certain conditions. Results showed that feature-usage patterns were not affected by any of the manipulations, but that they were determined by specific job demands. Using Constantine and Lockwood's (1999) conceptualization of user roles, a method to support feature bundling decisions for specific target markets was developed and tested in the second study. The method -- Strategic User Needs Analysis (SUNA) -- was shown to yield a useful balance between high- and low-level information about selected roles. SUNA provided sufficient information to distinguish between PDA feature usage patterns of two similar target user groups as well as to suggest additional features each of the two target groups would find useful. The development of SUNA and observational findings of actual PDA usage are reported.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard and Narasimhan and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Diaper, Dan and Lindgaard, Gitte (2008): West meets East: Adapting Activity Theory for HCI & CSCW applications?. In Interacting with Computers, 20 (2) pp. 240-246.

This is the introduction to a set of seven commentary papers. Activity Theory, with its roots in Soviet Communist society, is introduced and the relevant, critical concept of a three level hierarchy of human activity is summarised, along with a key proposal that for Western HCI and CSCW applications the utility of this hierarchy would be improved by the introduction of a new, intermediate level, called either 'working spheres' or 'engagements'. A thumbnail sketch of each commentary paper is then provided. Analysis of these papers reveals a set of five 'convergences', ideas and conclusions that occur in at least two of the papers. This introduction concludes that while the problems of migrating and adapting Activity Theory to Western HCI and CSCW applications are here made visible, very similar issues arise when attempts are made using linguistically and culturally closer theories, methods and practices.

© All rights reserved Diaper and Lindgaard and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Ferres, Leo, Verkhogliad, Petro, Sumegi, Livia, Boucher, Louis, Lachance, Martin and Lindgaard, Gitte (2008): A syntactic analysis of accessibility to a corpus of statistical graphs. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Cross-Disciplinary Conference on Web Accessibility W4A 2008. pp. 37-44.

Designing graphs and charts visually by means of graphing applications such as OpenOffice or MS Excel is extremely efficient and cost-effective. However, one of the drawbacks of such approach is that graphs are sometimes involuntarily made less accessible by, for instance, using a text box as title. In this paper we evaluate a corpus of 120 ecologically-valid statistical graphs for accessibility problems, discuss possible algorithms to solve these problems and finally propose the OM (Object Model) Principle, which states that any digital object is made more accessible by simply using the application's model for that object: for instance, the TITLE field for the title text.

© All rights reserved Ferres et al. and/or ACM Press

2007
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte and Chattratichart, Jarinee (2007): Usability testing: what have we overlooked?. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 1415-1424.

For more than a decade, the number of usability test participants has been a major theme of debate among usability practitioners and researchers keen to improve usability test performance. This paper provides evidence suggesting that the focus be shifted to task coverage instead. Our data analysis of nine commercial usability test teams participating in the CUE-4 study revealed no significant correlation between the percentage of problems found or of new problems and number of test users, but correlations of both variables and number of user tasks used by each usability team were significant. The role of participant recruitment on usability test performance and future research directions are discussed.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard and Chattratichart and/or ACM Press

 
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Ferres, Leo, Verkhogliad, Petro, Lindgaard, Gitte, Boucher, Louis, Chretien, Antoine and Lachance, Martin (2007): Improving accessibility to statistical graphs: the iGraph-Lite system. In: Ninth Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2007. pp. 67-74.

Information is often presented in graphical form. Unfortunately, current assistive technologies such as screen readers are not well-equipped to handle these representations. To provide accessibility to graphs published in "The Daily" (Statistics Canada's main dissemination venue), we have developed iGraph-Lite, a system that provides short verbal descriptions of the information depicted in graphs and a way to also interact with this information.

© All rights reserved Ferres et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mahlke, Sascha and Lindgaard, Gitte (2007): Emotional Experiences and Quality Perceptions of Interactive Products. In: Jacko, Julie A. (ed.) HCI International 2007 - 12th International Conference - Part I July 22-27, 2007, Beijing, China. pp. 164-173.

 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (2007): Intelligent decision support in medicine: back to Bayes?. In: Brinkman, Willem-Paul, Ham, Dong-Han and Wong, B. L. William (eds.) ECCE 2007 - Proceedings of the 14th European Conference on Cognitive Ergonomics August 28-31, 2007, London, UK. pp. 7-8.

 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (2007): Introducing HCI into an Organization: Making a Convincing Case for Usability. In: Baranauskas, Maria Ceclia Calani, Palanque, Philippe A., Abascal, Julio and Barbosa, Simone Diniz Junqueira (eds.) DEGAS 2007 - Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Design and Evaluation of e-Government Applications and Services September 11th, 2007, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. pp. 708-709.

2006
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte, Fernandes, Gary, Dudek, Cathy and Brown, J. (2006): Attention web designers: You have 50 milliseconds to make a good first impression. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 25 (2) pp. 115-126.

Three studies were conducted to ascertain how quickly people form an opinion about web page visual appeal. In the first study, participants twice rated the visual appeal of web homepages presented for 500 ms each. The second study replicated the first, but participants also rated each web page on seven specific design dimensions. Visual appeal was found to be closely related to most of these. Study 3 again replicated the 500 ms condition as well as adding a 50 ms condition using the same stimuli to determine whether the first impression may be interpreted as a 'mere exposure effect' (Zajonc 1980). Throughout, visual appeal ratings were highly correlated from one phase to the next as were the correlations between the 50 ms and 500 ms conditions. Thus, visual appeal can be assessed within 50 ms, suggesting that web designers have about 50 ms to make a good first impression.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 Cited in the following chapters:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]

Emotion and website design: [/encyclopedia/emotion_and_website_design.html]


 
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte, Dillon, Richard, Trbovich, Patricia, White, Rachel, Fernandes, Gary, Lundahl, Sonny and Pinnamaneni, Anu (2006): User Needs Analysis and requirements engineering: Theory and practice. In Interacting with Computers, 18 (1) pp. 47-70.

Several comprehensive User Centred Design methodologies have been published in the last decade, but while they all focus on users, they disagree on exactly what activities should take place during the User Needs Analysis, what the end products of a User Needs Analysis should cover, how User Needs Analysis findings should be presented, and how these should be documented and communicated. This paper highlights issues in different stages of the User Needs Analysis that appear to cause considerable confusion among researchers and practitioners. It is our hope that the User-Centred Design community may begin to address these issues systematically. A case study is presented reporting a User Needs Analysis methodology and process as well as the user interface design of an application supporting communication among first responders in a major disaster. It illustrates some of the differences between the User-Centred Design and the Requirements Engineering communities and shows how and where User-Centred Design and Requirements Engineering methodologies should be integrated, or at least aligned, to avoid some of the problems practitioners face during the User Needs Analysis.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Ferres, Leo, Parush, Avi, Roberts, Shelley and Lindgaard, Gitte (2006): Helping People with Visual Impairments Gain Access to Graphical Information Through Natural Language: The iGraph System. In: Miesenberger, Klaus, Klaus, Joachim, Zagler, Wolfgang L. and Karshmer, Arthur I. (eds.) ICCHP 2006 - Computers Helping People with Special Needs, 10th International Conference July 11-13, 2006, Linz, Austria. pp. 1122-1130.

2004
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (2004): Adventurers versus nit-pickers on affective computing. In Interacting with Computers, 16 (4) pp. 723-728.

In reviewing the three articles presented by the MIT group on some aspects of affective computing I voice some of my concerns with the view that we can and should design computers to respond to our changing moods and whims, and my strong skepticism towards claims that such responsiveness should make us happier human beings in the long run. I first explain and justify my position, then briefly address the notion of affect, and finally, present some thoughts on trust.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (2004): Making the business our business: one path to value-added HCI. In Interactions, 11 (3) pp. 12-17.

 
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Pilgrim, C. J., Leung, Ying K. and Lindgaard, Gitte (2004): Supplemental Navigation Tools for Website Navigation - A Comparison of User Expectations and Current Practice. In: Proceedings of the HCI04 Conference on People and Computers XVIII 2004. pp. 263-276.

 
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Pilgrim, Chris, Lindgaard, Gitte and Leung, Ying K. (2004): Factors Influencing User Selection of WWW Sitemaps. In: Masoodian, Masood, Jones, Steve and Rogers, Bill (eds.) Computer Human Interaction 6th Asia Pacific Conference - APCHI 2004 June 29 - July 2, 2004, Rotorua, New Zealand. pp. 625-630.

2003
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte and Dudek, Cathy (2003): What is this evasive beast we call user satisfaction?. In Interacting with Computers, 15 (3) pp. 429-452.

The notion of user satisfaction' plays a prominent role in HCI, yet it remains evasive. This exploratory study reports three experiments from an ongoing research program. In this program we aim to uncover (1) what user satisfaction is, (2) whether it is primarily determined by user expectations or by the interactive experience, (3) how user satisfaction may be related to perceived usability, and (4) the extent to which satisfaction rating scales capture the same interface qualities as uncovered in self-reports of interactive experiences. In all three experiments reported here user satisfaction was found to be a complex construct comprising several concepts, the distribution of which varied with the nature of the experience. Expectations were found to play an important role in the way users approached a browsing task. Satisfaction and perceived usability was assessed using two methods: scores derived from unstructured interviews and from the Web site Analysis MeasureMent Inventory (WAMMI) rating scales. Scores on these two instruments were somewhat similar, but conclusions drawn across all three experiments differed in terms of satisfaction ratings, suggesting that rating scales and interview statements may tap different interface qualities. Recent research suggests that beauty', or appeal' is linked to perceived usability so that what is beautiful' is also perceived to be usable [Interacting with Computers 13 (2000) 127]. This was true in one experiment here using a web site high in perceived usability and appeal. However, using a site with high appeal but very low in perceived usability yielded very high satisfaction, but low perceived usability scores, suggesting that what is beautiful' need not also be perceived to be usable. The results suggest that web designers may need to pay attention to both visual appeal and usability.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard and Dudek and/or Elsevier Science

 Cited in the following chapters:

Visual Aesthetics: [/encyclopedia/visual_aesthetics.html]

Emotion and website design: [/encyclopedia/emotion_and_website_design.html]


 
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (2003): The Misapplication of Engineering Models to Business Decisions. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 367.

 
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Steiger, Patrick, Lindgaard, Gitte, Felix, Daniel and Millard, Nicola (2003): The Business Case of HCI. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 1049.

2001
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (2001): From the Ashes of Disaster into a Human Factors Boom: The Legacy of Large Databases. In: Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2001. pp. 1272-1276.

1997
 
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Howard, Steve, Hammond, Judith H. and Lindgaard, Gitte (eds.) Proceedings of INTERACT 97 - IFIP TC13 Sixth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction July 14-18, 1997, Sydney, Australia.

 
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Howard, Steve, Hammond, Judy and Lindgaard, Gitte (eds.) Human-Computer Interaction, INTERACT 97, IFIP TC13 Interantional Conference on Human-Computer Interaction, 14th-18th July 1997, Sydney, Australia 1997.

1995
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (1995): Human Performance in Fault Diagnosis: Can Expert Systems Help?. In Interacting with Computers, 7 (3) pp. 254-272.

Two unrelated fields are compared within which fault diagnosis plays a significant role: medical and process control. It is argued that the diagnostic process may be seen to be very similar regardless of the domain of application, and that characteristics of human problem solving are common to all domains, including medicine and process control. However, it is shown that the kind of computer support needed to enhance diagnostic activities varies considerably between these domains. Judgemental biases and application of inappropriate heuristics are shown to be as prevalent among expert diagnosticians in both domains as among non-experts, and the complex concept of diagnosticity is apparently poorly understood. For that reason, medical experts need assistance in generating a wider range of hypotheses than they habitually consider and also in generating probabilistic information to supplement diagnostic performance. By contrast, multilevel displays that emphasize the relationship between critical variables in perceptually salient ways are needed to support process control operators.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard and/or Elsevier Science

1994
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (1994): Usability Testing and System Evaluation: A Guide for Designing Useful Computing Systems. Chapman and Hall

 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (1994): Usability Testing and System Evaluation: A Guide for Designing Useful Computing Systems. Chapman and Hall

 
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Bevan, Nigel, Harker, Susan, Lindgaard, Gitte and Hammond, Judith H. (1994): Standards in HCI. In: Proceedings of OZCHI94, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1994. pp. 81-83.

 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (1994): Human Performance in Fault Diagnosis: Can Expert Systems Help?. In: Proceedings of OZCHI94, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1994. pp. 241-246.

This paper argues that expert systems should be designed to supplement human cognitive limitations if they are to offer valuable assistance to expert problem solvers. Two areas of human expertise, namely fault diagnostics, are explored to illustrate that even apparently similar domains require quite different kinds of information to support expert problem solving activities adequately. Some of the most frequently occurring judgmental biases are highlighted to illustrate the difficulties associated with extracting expertise from experts.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard and/or Ergonomics Society of Australia

 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (1994): Usability Testing and System Evaluation: A Guide for Designing Useful Computing Systems. Chapman and Hall

1992
 
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Howard, Steve, Kaplan, I. and Lindgaard, Gitte (1992): CHI in Australia. In: Bauersfeld, Penny, Bennett, John and Lynch, Gene (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 92 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 3-7, 1992, Monterey, California. pp. 573-574.

 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (1992): Getting HCI on the Agenda: What's the Message?. In: Proceedings of OZCHI92, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1992. pp. 182-189.

HCI is not an integral part of systems design yet. This paper claims that some reasons for this are attributable to the HCI community itself neglecting to practise what it preaches, namely to use the language of its users in communicating HCI cum Human Factors messages to developers. We need to rethink the purpose of HCI guidelines, to think through the implications of findings from tests before these are conducted, to communicate these in a language that make sense to developers, and to calculate the value of such findings in monetary terms for senior management. Possible ways to integrate HCI into design are outlined.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard and/or ACM Press

 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (1992): Exploring HCI Into the '90s: CHISIG Australia 1990 Conference Report. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 24 (1) pp. 14-17.

1991
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (1991): Usefulness: The Ecological Value of Usability. In: Proceedings of OZCHI91, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1991. pp. 9-14.

This paper deals with the importance of conducting User Needs Analyses prior to designing, modifying or purchasing computer systems. Cases are presented that illustrate the effects one might expect on systems usage and usability when such analyses are not carried out. It is argued that User Needs Analyses conducted from within a wide framework or organisational, job and task needs be incorporated as an integral part of usability testing and evaluation plans. A warning is issued against the strong tendency to concentrate on development and refinement of usability measurement tools which can, it is argued, lead to a state of usability myopia in which the bigger issues of understanding users, their tasks and needs are overlooked.

© All rights reserved Lindgaard and/or Ergonomics Society of Australia

1990
 
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Lindgaard, Gitte (1990): Pioneering HCI Down Under: A Mixture of Perseverance and Fun. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 21 (4) pp. 65-69.

 
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Publication statistics

Pub. period:1990-2012
Pub. count:42
Number of co-authors:47



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Leo Ferres:4
Steve Howard:3
Cathy Dudek:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Gitte Lindgaard's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Steve Howard:57
Susan M. Dray:51
Robert Biddle:48
 
 
 

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