Publication statistics

Pub. period:1995-2012
Pub. count:46
Number of co-authors:94



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Helene Hembrooke:10
Dan Cosley:8
Laura A. Granka:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Geri Gay's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Kate Ehrlich:37
Dan Cosley:32
Phoebe Sengers:29
 
 
 
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Geri Gay

Has also published under the name of:
"Geri K. Gay"

Personal Homepage:
http://www.cis.cornell.edu/gay.html

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Publications by Geri Gay (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Deline, Mary Beth, Baumer, Eric P. S. and Gay, Geri (2012): Normative communication processes and associated emotion in mobile health groups. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 75-78.

This project uses content analysis to investigate normative communication processes and associated emotion in two case studies. Individuals were formed into groups and used a mobile health application, VERA, to perform 'health behaviors' (such as indicating what they were eating or their exercise behaviors) for other group members via mobile posts. Initial results indicate that these performances tended to be more normatively descriptive than judgmental. In addition, in both cases comparisons between judgmental and descriptive performances showed more negative emotion with judgmental performances. Further analysis will involve determining normative performance patterns over time in the groups, as well as whether the performer's self report of emotion was similar to or different from the performed normative emotion. These findings will better our understanding of how norms are developed and used in group contexts, which could lead to more effective normative health interventions.

© All rights reserved Deline et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Birnholtz, Jeremy, Forlano, Laura, Yuan, Y. Connie, Rizzo, Julia, Liao, Kerwell, Gay, Geri and Heller, Caren (2012): One university, two campuses: initiating and sustaining research collaborations between two campuses of a single institution. In: Proceedings of the 2012 iConference 2012. pp. 33-40.

Collaboration has many benefits, but can also be difficult due to increased coordination, incompatible work styles or research approaches, and difficulty in communication. These problems are often exacerbated by distance, which can make collaboration between departments on a single campus more attractive; particularly as universities invest in interdisciplinary facilities. At some universities, however, some departments may be located on a separate campus, hundreds of miles away. This creates unique challenges for these universities in encouraging and supporting collaboration. There have been few systematic studies, however, of collaborations between campuses of a single institution. We report on a qualitative study of collaborations between the medical college and other departments of our university, located 230 miles apart. Results suggest that participants felt it was very important to build social ties or draw on existing experience with potential collaborators prior to starting a project. Participants also identified unexpected institutional obstacles to working effectively.

© All rights reserved Birnholtz et al. and/or their publisher

2011
 
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Halpern, Megan K., Tholander, Jakob, Evjen, Max, Davis, Stuart, Ehrlich, Andrew, Schustak, Kyle, Baumer, Eric P. S. and Gay, Geri (2011): MoBoogie: creative expression through whole body musical interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 557-560.

In this paper we describe MoBoogie, an application that allows users to manipulate and arrange music through movement. MoBoogie is designed to foster experiences in creative expression for children and potentially adults. The application responds to users' movements by changing variables in a continuous stream of music loops. Results from this study suggest that the creative expressions arose in the joint space of movement and music, and did not primarily have to be in one form or the other. This allowed users with limited experience in dance and music making to be creative in such forms of expression.

© All rights reserved Halpern et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Pollak, John P., Adams, Phil and Gay, Geri (2011): PAM: a photographic affect meter for frequent, in situ measurement of affect. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 725-734.

The assessment of emotion, or affect, is critical for anyone trying to understand human behavior. But there is a problem: affect as a state is frequently changing and difficult to recall and express, yet in research, we typically only assess it via a single questionnaire at the end of a study. This work presents PAM, the Photographic Affect Meter, a novel tool for measuring affect in which users select from a wide variety of photos the one which best suits their current mood. Our findings indicate that PAM-which takes seconds to complete and is designed to run on modern mobile phones and mobile computing devices-demonstrates strong construct validity across two studies and is very well suited for frequent sampling in context. This work provides a tool to researchers in need of frequent assessment of affect and guidance to others interested in developing similar measurement tools.

© All rights reserved Pollak et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Welser, Howard T., Cosley, Dan, Kossinets, Gueorgi, Lin, Austin, Dokshin, Fedor, Gay, Geri and Smith, Marc (2011): Finding social roles in Wikipedia. In: Proceedings of the 2011 iConference 2011. pp. 122-129.

This paper investigates some of the social roles people play in the online community of Wikipedia. We start from qualitative comments posted on community oriented pages, wiki project memberships, and user talk pages in order to identify a sample of editors who represent four key roles: substantive experts, technical editors, vandal fighters, and social networkers. Patterns in edit histories and egocentric network visualizations suggest potential "structural signatures" that could be used as quantitative indicators of role adoption. Using simple metrics based on edit histories we compare two samples of Wikipedians: a collection of long term dedicated editors, and a cohort of editors from a one month window of new arrivals. According to these metrics, we find that the proportions of editor types in the new cohort are similar those observed in the sample of dedicated contributors. The number of new editors playing helpful roles in a single month's cohort nearly equal the number found in the dedicated sample. This suggests that informal socialization has the potential provide sufficient role related labor despite growth and change in Wikipedia. These results are preliminary, and we describe several ways that the method can be improved, including the expansion and refinement of role signatures and identification of other important social roles.

© All rights reserved Welser et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Thom-Santelli, Jennifer, Cosley, Dan and Gay, Geri (2010): What do you know?: experts, novices and territoriality in collaborative systems. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1685-1694.

When experts participate in collaborative systems, tension may arise between them and novice contributors. In particular, when experts perceive novices as a bother or a threat, the experts may express territoriality: behaviors communicating ownership of a target of interest. In this paper, we describe the results of a user study of a mobile social tagging system deployed within a museum gallery to a group of novices and experts collaboratively tagging part of the collection. We observed that experts express greater feelings of ownership towards their contributions to the system and the museum in general. Experts were more likely than novices to participate at higher rates and to negatively evaluate contributions made by others. We suggest a number of design strategies to balance experts' expressions of territoriality so as to motivate their participation while discouraging exclusionary behaviors.

© All rights reserved Thom-Santelli et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Gonzales, Amy L., Ng, Tiffany Y., Zhao, OJ and Gay, Geri (2010): Motivating expressive writing with a text-to-sound application. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1937-1940.

Writing about emotional experiences has been shown to have long-term physical and mental health benefits, but it also creates short-term discomfort. We designed a system to motivate expressive writing by enhancing enjoyment and pleasure. Using automated language analysis, we designed a system that maps sound onto categories of language resulting in a musical interpretation of expressive writing texts. An experimental design compared the experience of 126 participants across musical and non-musical writing platforms Participants found the musical system to be more pleasurable.

© All rights reserved Gonzales et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Leshed, Gilly, Cosley, Dan, Hancock, Jeffrey T. and Gay, Geri (2010): Visualizing language use in team conversations: designing through theory, experiments, and iterations. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4567-4582.

One way to potentially help people develop effective teamwork skills is to visualize elements of their language use during team conversations. There are several challenges in designing such visualizations, such as how to balance attention between the conversation and the visualization and how much guidance to offer about appropriate behaviors. We discuss the design space around these questions in the context of GroupMeter, a chatroom augmented with visualizations of language use. We generate and critique potential answers to these questions using prior theoretical and empirical work, then describe how the interface evolved and how our answers changed over a series of prototypes we deployed in experimental studies. We conclude with the lessons from our experience that could be used by designers of collaboration-enhancing systems.

© All rights reserved Leshed et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Shami, N. Sadat, Ehrlich, Kate, Gay, Geri and Hancock, Jeffrey T. (2009): Making sense of strangers' expertise from signals in digital artifacts. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 69-78.

Contemporary work increasingly involves interacting with strangers in technology-mediated environments. In this context, we come to rely on digital artifacts to infer characteristics of other people. This paper reports the results of a study conducted in a global company that used expertise search as a vehicle for exploring how people interpret a range of information available in online profiles in evaluating whom to interact with for expertise. Using signaling theory as a conceptual framework, we describe how certain 'signals' in various social software are hard to fake, and are thus more reliable indicators of expertise. Multi-level regression analysis revealed that participation in social software, social connection information, and self-described expertise in the corporate directory were significantly helpful in the decision to contact someone for expertise. Qualitative analysis provided further insights regarding the interpretations people form of others' expertise from digital artifacts. We conclude with suggestions on differentiating various types of information available within online profiles and implications for the design of expertise locator/recommender systems.

© All rights reserved Shami et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Leshed, Gilly, Perez, Diego, Hancock, Jeffrey T., Cosley, Dan, Birnholtz, Jeremy, Lee, Soyoung, McLeod, Poppy L. and Gay, Geri (2009): Visualizing real-time language-based feedback on teamwork behavior in computer-mediated groups. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 537-546.

While most collaboration technologies are concerned with supporting particular tasks such as workflows or meetings, many work groups do not have the teamwork skills essential to effective collaboration. One way to improve teamwork is to provide dynamic feedback generated by automated analyses of behavior, such as language use. Such feedback can lead members to reflect on and subsequently improve their collaborative behavior, but might also distract from the task at hand. We have experimented with GroupMeter -- a chat-based system that presents visual feedback on team members' language use. Feedback on proportion of agreement words and overall word count was presented using two different designs. When receiving feedback, teams in our study expressed more agreement in their conversations and reported greater focus on language use as compared to when not receiving feedback. This suggests that automated, real-time linguistic feedback can elicit behavioral changes, offering opportunities for future research.

© All rights reserved Leshed et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Thom-Santelli, Jennifer, Cosley, Dan R. and Gay, Geri (2009): What's mine is mine: territoriality in collaborative authoring. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1481-1484.

Territoriality, the expression of ownership towards an object, can emerge when social actors occupy a shared social space. In the case of Wikipedia, the prevailing cultural norm is one that warns against ownership of one's work. However, we observe the emergence of territoriality in online space with respect to a subset of articles that have been tagged with the Maintained template through a qualitative study of 15 editors who have self-designated as Maintainers. Our participants communicated ownership, demarcated boundaries and asserted their control over artifacts for the sake of quality by appropriating existing features of Wikipedia. We then suggest design strategies to support these behaviors in the proper context within collaborative authoring systems more generally.

© All rights reserved Thom-Santelli et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cosley, Dan, Baxter, Jonathan, Lee, Soyoung, Alson, Brian, Nomura, Saeko, Adams, Phil, Sarabu, Chethan and Gay, Geri (2009): A tag in the hand: supporting semantic, social, and spatial navigation in museums. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1953-1962.

Designers of mobile, social systems must carefully think about how to help their users manage spatial, semantic, and social modes of navigation. Here, we describe our deployment of MobiTags, a system to help museum visitors interact with a collection of "open storage" exhibits, those where the museum provides little curatorial information. MobiTags integrates social tagging, art information, and a map to support navigation and collaborative curation of these open storage collections. We studied 23 people's use of MobiTags in a local museum, combining interview data with device use logs and tracking of people's movements to understand how MobiTags affected their navigation and experience in the museum. Despite a lack of social cues, people feel a strong sense of social presence -- and social pressure -- through seeing others' tags. The tight coupling of tags, item information, and map features also supported a rich set of practices around these modes of navigation.

© All rights reserved Cosley et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Cosley, Dan, Lewenstein, Joel, Herman, Andrew, Holloway, Jenna, Baxter, Jonathan, Nomura, Saeko, Boehner, Kirsten and Gay, Geri (2008): ArtLinks: fostering social awareness and reflection in museums. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 403-412.

Technologies in museums often support learning goals, providing information about exhibits. However, museum visitors also desire meaningful experiences and enjoy the social aspects of museum-going, values ignored by most museum technologies. We present ArtLinks, a visualization with three goals: helping visitors make connections to exhibits and other visitors by highlighting those visitors who share their thoughts; encouraging visitors' reflection on the social and liminal aspects of museum-going and their expectations of technology in museums; and doing this with transparency, aligning aesthetically pleasing elements of the design with the goals of connection and reflection. Deploying ArtLinks revealed that people have strong expectations of technology as an information appliance. Despite these expectations, people valued connections to other people, both for their own sake and as a way to support meaningful experience. We also found several of our design choices in the name of transparency led to unforeseen tradeoffs between the social and the liminal.

© All rights reserved Cosley et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Nomura, Saeko, Birnholtz, Jeremy, Rieger, Oya, Leshed, Gilly, Trumbull, Deborah and Gay, Geri (2008): Cutting into collaboration: understanding coordination in distributed and interdisciplinary medical research. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 427-436.

Coordinating goals, schedules, and tasks among collaborators is difficult, and made even more so when there are disciplinary, geographic and institutional boundaries that must be spanned. Designing CSCW tools to support coordination in these settings, however, requires an improved under-standing of the constraints and conflicts that impede effective collaboration. We present findings from a study of distributed collaborations between academic surgeons and biomedical engineering researchers. These two groups differ significantly in their work priorities and institutional contexts, but are nonetheless able to work together and co-ordinate effectively. They accomplish this via human mediation, frequent ad hoc communication, and optimizing the use of their limited face-to-face interaction opportunities.

© All rights reserved Nomura et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Sengers, Phoebe, Boehner, Kirsten, Mateas, Michael and Gay, Geri (2008): The disenchantment of affect. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 12 (5) pp. 347-358.

 
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Lorigo, Lori, Haridasan, Maya, Brynjarsdttir, Hrnn, Xia, Ling, Joachims, Thorsten, Gay, Geri, Granka, Laura A., Pellacini, Fabio and Pan, Bing (2008): Eye tracking and online search: Lessons learned and challenges ahead. In JASIST - Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 59 (7) pp. 1041-1052.

2007
 
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Leshed, Gilly, Hancock, Jeffrey T., Cosley, Dan, McLeod, Poppy L. and Gay, Geri (2007): Feedback for guiding reflection on teamwork practices. In: GROUP07: International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2007. pp. 217-220.

Effective communication in project teams is important, but not often taught. We explore how feedback might improve teamwork in a controlled experiment where groups interact through chat rooms. Collaborators who receive high feedback ratings use different language than poor collaborators (e.g. more words, fewer assents, and less affect-laden language). Further, feedback affects language use. This suggests that a system could use linguistic analysis to automatically provide and visualize feedback to teach teamwork. To this end, we present GroupMeter, a system that applies principles discovered in the experiment to provide feedback both from peers and from automated linguistic analysis.

© All rights reserved Leshed et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Shami, N. Sadat, Yuan, Y. Connie, Cosley, Dan, Xia, Ling and Gay, Geri (2007): That's what friends are for: facilitating 'who knows what' across group boundaries. In: GROUP07: International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2007. pp. 379-382.

We describe the design and evaluation of K-net, a social matching system to help people learn 'who knows what' in an organization by matching people with skills with those who need them. Transactive memory theory predicts that K-net will improve individuals' awareness of 'who knows what'. This should lead to improved performance through sharing knowledge across group boundaries. We evaluate K-net in terms of these predictions in an experiment with 41 students in seven groups working on software engineering projects. Accurate recommendations improved awareness of 'who knows what' versus 'random' recommendations, but did not improve performance. Our results highlight issues related to the evaluation of systems for sharing knowledge across group boundaries.

© All rights reserved Shami et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Joachims, Thorsten, Granka, Laura, Pan, Bing, Hembrooke, Helene, Radlinski, Filip and Gay, Geri (2007): Evaluating the accuracy of implicit feedback from clicks and query reformulations in Web search. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 25 (2) p. 7.

This article examines the reliability of implicit feedback generated from clickthrough data and query reformulations in World Wide Web (WWW) search. Analyzing the users' decision process using eyetracking and comparing implicit feedback against manual relevance judgments, we conclude that clicks are informative but biased. While this makes the interpretation of clicks as absolute relevance judgments difficult, we show that relative preferences derived from clicks are reasonably accurate on average. We find that such relative preferences are accurate not only between results from an individual query, but across multiple sets of results within chains of query reformulations.

© All rights reserved Joachims et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Xia, Ling, Shami, N. Sadat, Yuan, Y. Connie and Gay, Geri (2007): The Impact of Negative Relations on Performance and Satisfaction in Group Work. In: Proceedings of the 40th Hawaii International Conference on Systems Sciences HICSS-40 07 2007, Hawaii, USA. p. 246a.

This paper reports on a case study conducted to guide the design and implementation of a group support system. Network analysis of student self-reported interactions was conducted to obtain a better understanding of social relations, which are critical in informing the design of systems that support sociability. Building on previous research on group dynamics, the study examined the impact of negative relations and frequency of communication on performance and satisfaction among 13 groups of students. Results show that group members disliked by others were less likely to perform well; group members were less likely to feel satisfied with the group process when they disliked others; and frequent communication with others could make a person more likeable and help him/her perform better. We conclude by providing suggestions about how to incorporate findings from network analysis into the design of communication technologies to support group work.

© All rights reserved Xia et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Xia, Ling, Shami, N. Sadat, Yuan, Y. Connie and Gay, Geri (2007): The Impact of Negative Relations on Performance and Satisfaction in Group Work. In: HICSS 2007 - 40th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 3-6 January, 2007, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. p. 246.

2006
 
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Pan, Bing, Gay, Geri, Saylor, John and Hembrooke, Helene (2006): One digital library, two undergraduate classes, and four learning modules: Uses of a digital library in classrooms. In JASIST - Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 57 (10) pp. 1315-1325.

 
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Granka, Laura A., Hembrooke, Helene and Gay, Geri (2006): Location location location: viewing patterns on WWW pages. In: Rih, Kari-Jouko and Duchowski, Andrew T. (eds.) ETRA 2006 - Proceedings of the Eye Tracking Research and Application Symposium March 27-29, 2006, San Diego, California, USA. p. 43.

 
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Hembrooke, Helene, Feusner, Matthew K. and Gay, Geri (2006): Averaging scan patterns and what they can tell us. In: Rih, Kari-Jouko and Duchowski, Andrew T. (eds.) ETRA 2006 - Proceedings of the Eye Tracking Research and Application Symposium March 27-29, 2006, San Diego, California, USA. p. 41.

2005
 
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Joachims, Thorsten, Granka, Laura, Pan, Bing, Hembrooke, Helene and Gay, Geri (2005): Accurately interpreting clickthrough data as implicit feedback. In: Proceedings of the 28th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2005. pp. 154-161.

This paper examines the reliability of implicit feedback generated from clickthrough data in WWW search. Analyzing the users' decision process using eyetracking and comparing implicit feedback against manual relevance judgments, we conclude that clicks are informative but biased. While this makes the interpretation of clicks as absolute relevance judgments difficult, we show that relative preferences derived from clicks are reasonably accurate on average.

© All rights reserved Joachims et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Boehner, Kirsten, Thom-Santelli, Jennifer, Zoss, Angela, Gay, Geri, Hall, Justin S. and Barrett, Tucker (2005): Imprints of place: creative expressions of the museum experience. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1220-1223.

Personalization and social awareness, important aspects in the definition of a place, are traditionally overlooked in the design of technology for museums. We describe Imprints, a system to enhance the role of visitor participation beyond information receiver to active creator of sense of place. Overall response to the Imprints system is explored through interviews and log analysis of use. Despite some usability issues, response to the system was positive, and it was appropriated for both personalization and awareness of others. The results suggest an opportunity to introduce technology that plays with the dynamic between private expression and public presence in the traditional environment of the art museum.

© All rights reserved Boehner et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hembrooke, Helene, Granka, Laura A., Gay, Geri and Liddy, Elizabeth D. (2005): The effects of expertise and feedback on search term selection and subsequent learning. In JASIST - Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 56 (8) pp. 861-871.

2004
 
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Stefanone, Michael, Hancock, Jeffery, Gay, Geri and Ingraffea, Anthony (2004): Emergent networks, locus of control, and the pursuit of social capital. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 592-595.

In this paper we examine the relationship between emergent social network characteristics in a computer-supported collaborative learning course and locus of control. An emergent communication network of engineering students that took place in a distributed distance learning environment was examined. Three measures of an actor's social network, density, brokerage, and reach, and participants' locus of control, internal vs. external, were assessed. The data suggest that, relative to participants with external locus of control, participants with internal locus of control decreased their network density over time but increased their brokerage and reach. The results are discussed in the context of instrumental action, through which participants are assumed to develop personal networks in pursuit of maximizing potential social capital.

© All rights reserved Stefanone et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Granka, Laura A., Joachims, Thorsten and Gay, Geri (2004): Eye-tracking analysis of user behavior in WWW search. In: Proceedings of the 27th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2004. pp. 478-479.

We investigate how users interact with the results page of a WWW search engine using eye-tracking. The goal is to gain insight into how users browse the presented abstracts and how they select links for further exploration. Such understanding is valuable for improved interface design, as well as for more accurate interpretations of implicit feedback (e.g. clickthrough) for machine learning. The following presents initial results, focusing on the amount of time spent viewing the presented abstracts, the total number of abstract viewed, as well as measures of how thoroughly searchers evaluate their results set.

© All rights reserved Granka et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pan, Bing, Hembrooke, Helene, Gay, Geri, Granka, Laura A., Feusner, Matthew K. and Newman, Jill K. (2004): The determinants of web page viewing behavior: an eye-tracking study. In: Duchowski, Andrew T. and Vertegaal, Roel (eds.) ETRA 2004 - Proceedings of the Eye Tracking Research and Application Symposium March 22-24, 2004, San Antonio, Texas, USA. pp. 147-154.

2003
 
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Liddy, Elizabeth D., Allen, Eileen E., Finneran, Christina M., Gay, Geri, Hembrooke, Helene and Granka, Laura A. (2003): MetaTest: evaluation of metadata from generation to use. In: JCDL03: Proceedings of the 3rd ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2003. p. 398.

 
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Lee, Jae-Shin, Cho, Hichang, Gay, Geri, Davidson, Barry and Ingraffea, Anthony R. (2003): Technology Acceptance and Social Networking in Distance Learning. In Educational Technology & Society, 6 (2) pp. 50-61.

2002
 
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Burrell, Jenna and Gay, Geri (2002): E-graffiti: evaluating real-world use of a context-aware system. In Interacting with Computers, 14 (4) pp. 301-312.

Much of the previous research in context-aware computing has sought to find a workable definition of context and to develop systems that could detect and interpret contextual characteristics of an user environment. However, less time has been spent studying the usability of these types of systems. This was the goal of our project. E-graffiti is a context-aware application that detects the user's location on a college campus and displays text notes to the user based on their location. Additionally, it allows them to create notes that they can associate with a specific location. We released E-graffiti to 57 students who were using laptops that could access the campus wireless network. Their use of E-graffiti was logged in a remote database and they were also required to fill out a questionnaire towards the end of the semester. The lessons learned from the evaluation of E-graffiti point to themes other designers of ubiquitous and context-aware applications may need to address in designing their own systems. Some of the issues that emerged in the evaluation stage included difficulties with a misleading conceptual model, lack of use due to the reliance on explicit user input, the need for a highly relevant contextual focus, and the potential benefits of rapid, ongoing prototype development in tandem with user evaluation.

© All rights reserved Burrell and Gay and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Mentis, Helena M. and Gay, Geri (2002): Using TouchPad Pressure to Detect Negative Affect. In: 4th IEEE International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2002 14-16 October, 2002, Pittsburgh, PA, USA. pp. 406-410.

 
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Burrell, Jenna, Gay, Geri, Kubo, Kiyo and Farina, Nick (2002): Context-Aware Computing: A Test Case. In: Borriello, Gaetano and Holmquist, Lars Erik (eds.) UbiComp 2002 Ubiquitous Computing - 4th International Conference September 29 - October 1, 2002, Gteborg, Sweden. pp. 1-15.

 
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Gay, Geri and Hembrooke, Helene (2002): Browsing Behaviors in Wireless Learning Networks. In: HICSS 2002 2002. p. 33.

2001
 
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Gay, Geri, Stefanone, Michael, Grace-Martin, Michael and Hembrooke, Helene (2001): The Effects of Wireless Computing in Collaborative Learning Environments. In International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction, 13 (2) pp. 257-276.

Eighty-four students distributed between two different courses at a major research university (one a communication course, the other a computer science course) were given laptop computers with wireless network access during the course of a semester. A wide variety of data (from questionnaires, e-mail logs, proxy server logs, and diaries) regarding students' use of the laptops for electronic communication, Web browsing, and local application use (e.g., word processing) was collected and analyzed. The influences of course, network (wireless-wired), student population, and the passage of time were investigated in relation to the prevalence and nature of social computing (e.g., e-mail, instant messaging, chat, discussion boards, online annotations) in students' laptop usage. The relative prevalence of social computing increased and became more exclusive for students in the communication course, especially on the wireless network. Social computing and use of the wireless network were less prominent and influential for students in the computer science course.

© All rights reserved Gay et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

 
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Grace-Martin, Michael and Gay, Geri (2001): Web Browsing, Mobile Computing and Academic Performance. In Educational Technology & Society, 4 (3) .

2000
 
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Burrell, Jenna, Treadwell, Paul and Gay, Geri (2000): Designing for Context: Usability in a Ubiquitous Environment. In: Proceedings of the 2000 ACM Conference on Universal Usability 2000. pp. 80-84.

Freeing users from the desktop is now a practical reality in many environments. The implications for mobility are both far-reaching and under-realized in many of the current scenarios we have seen. Our work has focused on the integration of user input into the iterative design process used to develop a contextually aware application for use in an educational environment. We discuss the design and development of Semaphore, a contextually aware tool for use in wireless networked environments, and the unique opportunities an iterative design process presents for our work.

© All rights reserved Burrell et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Jones, Michael L. W., Rieger, Robert H., Treadwell, Paul and Gay, Geri (2000): Live from the Stacks: User Feedback on Mobile Computers and Wireless Tools for Library Patrons. In: DL00: Proceedings of the 5th ACM International Conference on Digital Libraries 2000. pp. 95-102.

Digital library research is made more robust and effective when end-user opinions and viewpoints inform the research, design and development process. A rich understanding of user tasks and contexts is especially necessary when investigating the use of mobile computers in traditional and digital library environments, since the nature and scope of the research questions at hand remain relatively undefined. This paper outlines findings from a library technologies user survey and on-site mobile library access prototype testing, and presents future research directions that can be derived from the results of these two studies.

© All rights reserved Jones et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Gay, Geri (2000): Editor's Introduction: Computer-Mediated Visual Communication. In J. Computer-Mediated Communication, 5 (4) .

 
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Bennington, Tammy L. and Gay, Geri (2000): Mediated Perceptions: Contributions of Phenomenological Film Theory to Understanding the Interactive Video Experience. In J. Computer-Mediated Communication, 5 (4) .

1999
 
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Gay, Geri, Sturgill, Amanda and Martin, Wendy (1999): Document-centered Peer Collaborations: An Exploration of the Educational Uses of Networked Communication Technologies. In J. Computer-Mediated Communication, 4 (3) .

1998
 
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Takahashi, Junichi, Kushida, Takayuki, Hong, Jung-Kook, Sugita, Shigeharu, Kurita, Yasuyuki, Rieger, Robert, Martin, Wendy, Gay, Geri, Reeve, John and Loverance, Rowena (1998): Global Digital Museum: Multimedia Information Access and Creation on the Internet. In: DL98: Proceedings of the 3rd ACM International Conference on Digital Libraries 1998. pp. 244-253.

Multimedia information access on the Internet creates a new paradigm for museum information and education service that complements conventional school programs. We designed and developed the Global Digital Museum to permit easy access to the cultural heritage stored in museums around the world. The system provides a single virtual museum, enabling global search and edit of museum contents on the Internet. We applied the Global Digital Museum model to K-12 museum education by using real museum multimedia data. Technical issues addressed include: 1) unified and global access to heterogeneous and distributed multimedia contents of museums; and 2) interactive editing of the contents on the World-Wide Web. We describe the concept of Global Digital Museum, the system and network architecture, the data model for museum information, and implementation of a prototype system on the Internet.

© All rights reserved Takahashi et al. and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Gay, Geri and Mead, June P. (1996): The Common Ground Surrounding Access: Theoretical and Practical Perspectives. In: DL96: Proceedings of the 1st ACM International Conference on Digital Libraries 1996. p. 178.

Research indicates that technologically-rich environments demand equally rich data collection and analysis tools -- ones capable of examining human-computer interactions as well as the social and cognitive dynamics that develop during computer mediated collaboration. Further, our research has demonstrated the need to address the social, psychological, and pedagogical aspects of online collaboration. We have found that by studying the multiple ways in which users interact with these new systems, we can develop tools that add value to digitized images, that allow scholars to annotate, manipulate, and organize the data they collect in creative multimedia compositions. What we have found convinces us that parallel development and evaluation combine synergistically to enhance the overall design process. Our poster explores the common ground surrounding access to digital libraries. It addresses such questions as: What promise does access to digital libraries hold? How does access to digital libraries change patterns of communication? What does access to primary sources mean to teachers, librarians, researchers and students? What tools do they need for multimedia composition? What strategies do people employ as they annotate, manipulate and organize the data they search for and collect? What new forms of message construction need to be understood within this collaborative environments? And finally, what happens after access -- how do people use digital information after they find it?

© All rights reserved Gay and Mead and/or ACM Press

1995
 
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Gay, Geri and Lentini, Marc (1995): Use of Communication Resources in a Networked Collaborative Design Environment. In J. Computer-Mediated Communication, 1 (1) .

 
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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/geri_gay.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1995-2012
Pub. count:46
Number of co-authors:94



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Helene Hembrooke:10
Dan Cosley:8
Laura A. Granka:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Geri Gay's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Kate Ehrlich:37
Dan Cosley:32
Phoebe Sengers:29
 
 
 
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