Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2011
Pub. count:42
Number of co-authors:54



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Steve Howard:18
Martin R. Gibbs:11
Sonja Pedell:9

 

 

Productive colleagues

Frank Vetere's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

John M. Carroll:209
Jesper Kjeldskov:63
Steve Howard:57
 
 
 

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Frank Vetere

Ph.D

Picture of Frank Vetere.
Update pic
Has also published under the name of:
"F. Vetere"

Personal Homepage:
http://www.frank.vetere.id.au/

Current place of employment:
The University of Melbourne

Frank Vetere is an Associate Professor in the Department of Computing and Information Systems at The University of Melbourne. He works with his colleagues in the Interaction Design Group at The University of Melbourne to develop methods for designing useful, usable and satisfying technology. He has specific interest in participatory design approaches and use-centred processes for creating innovative information and communication technology. Frank is particularly interested in using these methods with mobile and ubiquitous technologies in non-work settings.

 

Publications by Frank Vetere (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Edge, Darren, Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Agamanolis, Stefan, Bongers, Bert and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2011): Designing sports: a framework for exertion games. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2651-2660. Available online

Exertion games require investing physical effort. The fact that such games can support physical health is tempered by our limited understanding of how to design for engaging exertion experiences. This paper introduces the Exertion Framework as a way to think and talk about Exertion Games, both for their formative design and summative analysis. Our Exertion Framework is based on the ways in which we can conceive of the body investing in game-directed exertion, supported by four perspectives on the body (the Responding Body, Moving Body, Sensing Body and Relating Body) and three perspectives on gaming (rules, play and context). The paper illustrates how this framework was derived from prior systems and theory, and presents a case study of how it has been used to inspire novel exertion interactions.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Vutborg, Ren, Kjeldskov, Jesper, Paay, Jeni, Pedell, Sonja and Vetere, Frank (2011): Supporting young children's communication with adult relatives across time zones. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference 2011. pp. 291-300. Available online

Regular contact between children and their adult relatives can be a problem if they live in different time zones. In this situation, finding an agreed time to contact each other can be both confusing and complicated. This paper presents a study of the effect of time zone differences on communication between grandparents and grandchildren living in different time zones. We deployed a system between time zone distributed families to study this effect and analysed its use based on four parameters of time and events based theory: rigid sequential structures (that some events cannot occur before others), fixed durations (that most events always last the same time), standard temporal locations (that events have a standard time when they occur during the day) and uniform rates of recurrence (that some events always reoccur at a uniform rate). Our findings highlight the importance of: the need to consider the parents' role in facilitating contact and making the technology easy to use by children independently; the advantage of concurrent synchronous and asynchronous interaction forms; and the need to respect people's private time. These findings can inform the design of technology for supporting young children's communications with adult relatives across time zones.

© All rights reserved Vutborg et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Vutborg, Ren, Kjeldskov, Jesper, Pedell, Sonja and Vetere, Frank (2010): Family storytelling for grandparents and grandchildren living apart. In: Proceedings of the Sixth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2010. pp. 531-540. Available online

Grandparents may feel revitalized when a grandchild joins the family, but the physical separation that often exists between grandparents and grandchildren can make it difficult to develop a close relationship. Current communication technologies, such as the phone, are inadequate for developing close relationships with children. This paper presents the design, implementation and evaluation of a technology probe exploring how technology can be designed to alleviate this problem. Based on the evaluation, four important themes for designing technology for distributed intergenerational bonding are elicited and discussed. The four themes are Conversational Context (to have something to talk about), Facilitation (to be given the opportunity to talk), Diversified Interaction Forms (to maintain attention of the child) and Supporting Grandparent caring for grandchild (to adapt activity to the mood of the child).

© All rights reserved Vutborg et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mueller, Florian, Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Edge, Darren, Agamanolis, Stefan and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2010): Jogging over a distance between Europe and Australia. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 189-198. Available online

Exertion activities, such as jogging, require users to invest intense physical effort and are associated with physical and social health benefits. Despite the benefits, our understanding of exertion activities is limited, especially when it comes to social experiences. In order to begin understanding how to design for technologically augmented social exertion experiences, we present "Jogging over a Distance", a system in which spatialized audio based on heart rate allowed runners as far apart as Europe and Australia to run together. Our analysis revealed how certain aspects of the design facilitated a social experience, and consequently we describe a framework for designing augmented exertion activities. We make recommendations as to how designers could use this framework to aid the development of future social systems that aim to utilize the benefits of exertion.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2009): Design influence on social play in distributed exertion games. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1539-1548. Available online

Exertion games are an emerging form of interactive games that require players to invest significant physical effort as part of the gameplay, rather than just pressing buttons. These exertion games have potential health benefits by promoting exercise. It is also believed that they can facilitate social play between players and that social play can improve participation in exertion games. However, there is currently a lack of understanding of how to design games to support these effects. In this paper, we present a qualitative case study that illustrates how networked environments support social play in exertion games and how this can help to gain an understanding of existing games and support the design of future games. This work offers a preliminary analytical and descriptive account of the relationship between exertion and social play in such a game and highlights the influence of design with the aim of utilizing the attributed benefits of exertion and social play.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2009): The mousegrip. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3199-3204. Available online

Computer games, often played with others, are a compelling pastime for many. However, they have been criticized for their mouse and keyboard or gamepad interactions, as they support a sedentary lifestyle. In contrast, a "hand exerciser" handgrip device can help strengthen hand and forearm muscles extensively through a simple spring mechanism. Our system "mousegrip" is an exertion interface to control computer applications while simultaneously exercising hand and arm muscles based on a handgrip device. We present a casual game of pong for two distributed players who control the game with a mousegrip each, demonstrating a low-cost approach to "exertion interactions over a distance". By showing how easy it can be to include exertion in interactions with computers, we hope to encourage other researchers and designers to consider exertion activity in their designs in order to support a healthy lifestyle.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Agamanolis, Stefan, Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2009): Remote impact: shadowboxing over a distance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3531-3532. Available online

Exertion games -- games that require physical effort from the user -- have been attributed with many social, mental and in particular physical health benefits. However, research has shown that most current implementations support only light or moderate exercise. We are presenting "Remote Impact -- Shadowboxing over a Distance", in which players punch and kick a life-size shadow of a remote participant in order to win the game. The game includes a novel multi-touch large-scale interaction surface that is soft (so no-one gets hurt), but can detect the location as well as the intensity of the players' even most extreme impacts. Remote Impact shows that computer-augmented games can support extreme exertion while supporting novel experiences, such as a reduced risk of injury and supporting distant players, offering a new way of thinking in which areas Human-Computer Interaction research can contribute to our lives.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Harley, David A., Kurniawan, Sri H., Fitzpatrick, Geraldine and Vetere, Frank (2009): Age matters: bridging the generation gap through technology-mediated interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4799-4802. Available online

Internet-based, mobile and pervasive technologies provide the means for older people to establish and maintain intergenerational relationships over long distances. However the significance of this intergenerational context has been largely ignored when considering potential interactions and the design of new technologies. This workshop aims to explore what the important issues are when considering intergenerational contact as a significant context for design. The overarching objective of this workshop is to identify key research themes in respect of intergenerational communication and its implications for the design of interactive systems.

© All rights reserved Harley et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ashkanasy, Shawn, Vetere, Frank, Davis, Hillary and Shanks, Graeme (2009): Finding the other 5%: Understanding the role of social networking technologies in building personal networks for young adults with cancer. In: Proceedings of the 11th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2009. pp. 105-122. Available online

In this paper we explore the ways in which young adults with cancer (aged 17- 24) build support networks through computer mediated personal networks. The support networks are influenced by technological affordances and the ongoing experiences of living with the illness and treatment regimes. We report a single, in-depth case study of one young adult with cancer and her use of mobile telephony and web based social networking sites in building support networks. Three important themes emerge from this case. First, in this context computer mediated communications (CMC) are not exclusive to the maintenance of online relationships, but mediate networks of "core", "significant," and new ties (primarily online) over time. Second, the social engagement between the subject and members of their social networks is dynamic with different modes of communication predominant at different points in time and different relationships significant at different points in time depending on state of illness, treatment and context. Finally, the interplay between CMC and different ties influence the characteristics of the networks, which is characterized by bridging and segmenting networks.

© All rights reserved Ashkanasy et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Agamanolis, Stefan, Vetere, Frank and Gibbs, Martin (2009): Brute force interactions: leveraging intense physical actions in gaming. In: Proceedings of OZCHI09, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2009. pp. 57-64. Available online

People use a wide range of intensity when interacting with computers, spanning from subtle to brute force. However, computer interfaces so far have mainly focused on interactions restrained to limited force and do not consider extreme physical and brutal interactions, such as those encountered in contact sports. We present an exploration on the topic of "Brute Force" that aims to support researchers and designers who want to leverage the benefits of such forceful interactions. We present the results of a survey on this topic and describe how the salient themes could be used to inspire design work, in particular in a mediated environment, augmented with computing technology. We describe how the themes inspired certain features, and how technological limitations were overcome during this process. We hope with our work we can encourage designers to expand their range of supported interactions to include these physically intense behaviors we call Brute Force that are exhibited in many activities in people's lives.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Pedell, Sonja, Miller, Tim, Vetere, Frank, Sterling, Leon, Howard, Steve and Paay, Jeni (2009): Having fun at home: interleaving fieldwork and goal models. In: Proceedings of OZCHI09, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2009. pp. 309-312. Available online

We aim to make sense of a perplexing human experience (fun) as it occurs in a recently discovered place for socio-technical study (the home). Our toolkit includes technology probes, associated fieldwork and models from software engineering. We describe how we interleave the probes and models. As the work will please neither modeling nor fieldwork purists, we enunciate the benefits of our ambidextrous approach.

© All rights reserved Pedell et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Vetere, Frank, Davis, Hilary, Gibbs, Martin and Howard, Steve (2009): The Magic Box and Collage: Responding to the challenge of distributed intergenerational play. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 67 (2) pp. 165-178. Available online

This paper explores playfulness between grandparents and grandchildren, especially when they are separated by distance, and investigates ideas to bridge this separation. We present the result of a three stage investigation; the first an observational study of collocated intergenerational play groups, the second a cultural probes study of distributed intergenerational playfulness, and finally a technology probe study of a system for mediating intergenerational play across distance. In each case we discuss the nature of intergenerational play, the methodological issues, and explore opportunities for technological innovation through the 'Collage'. We argue that existing knowledge concerning the nature of support for the young-or-older users engaged in instrumental activities are inadequate when we wish to build understanding of and design for young-and-older users, engaged in collective playfulness.

© All rights reserved Vetere et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Paay, Jeni, Sterling, Leon, Vetere, Frank, Howard, Steve and Boettcher, Anne (2009): Engineering the social: The role of shared artifacts. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 67 (5) pp. 437-454. Available online

This paper presents a multidisciplinary approach to engineering socio-technical design. The paper addresses technological design for social interactions that are non-instrumental, and thereby sometimes contradictory or surprising and difficult to model. Through cooperative analysis of cultural probe data and development of agent-oriented software engineering (AOSE) models, ethnographers and software engineers participate in conversations around shared artifacts, which facilitate the transition from data collected in a social environment to a socially oriented requirements analysis for informing socio-technical design. To demonstrate how this transition was made, we present a case study of the process of designing technology to support familial relationships, such as playing, gifting, showing, telling and creating memories. The case study is based on data collected in a cultural probes study that explores the diverse, complex and unpredictable design environment of the home. A multidisciplinary team worked together through a process of conversations around shared artifacts to cooperatively analyze collected data and develop models. These conversations provided the opportunity to view the data from the perspective of alternative disciplines that resulted in the emergence of novel understandings and innovative practice. The artifacts in the process included returned probe items, scrapbooks, videos of interviews, photographs, family biographies and the AOSE requirements models. When shared between the two communities of practice, some of these artifacts played important roles in mediating discussions of mutual influence between ethnographers and software engineers. The shared artifacts acted as both triggers for conversations and information vessels -- providing a variety of interpretable objects enabling both sides to articulate their understandings in different ways and to collaboratively negotiate understandings of the collected data. Analyzing the interdisciplinary exchange provided insight into the identification of bridging elements that allowed 'the social' to permeate the processes of analysis, requirements elicitation and design.

© All rights reserved Paay et al. and/or Academic Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
2008
 
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Leong, Tuck, Howard, Steve and Vetere, Frank (2008): Choice: abdicating or exercising?. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 715-724. Available online

Many people today have access to enormous libraries of digital content. Increasingly these libraries contain personal content, consumed in support of people's non-instrumental needs. If current trends persist, these repositories will only increase. Having to choose from so much could be unpleasant especially in the absence of strong preferences. This raises some concerns for user experience (UX) design. Approaches for such interactions should not only be optimized for UX but must also support users' non-instrumental needs. People face this predicament during digital music listening and yet report positive experiences when listening in shuffle. Through an empirical study of digital music listening and close examination of people's listening practices and experiences, we argue that a shuffle-based approach -- whereby people can abdicate choice to a random process while being able to modulate the randomness -- not only mitigates the unpleasantness of choosing but also supports their non-instrumental needs while fostering desirable experiential outcomes.

© All rights reserved Leong et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian, Agamanolis, Stefan, Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2008): Remote impact: shadowboxing over a distance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2291-2296. Available online

People use a wide range of intensity when interacting with artifacts and one another, spanning from subtle to brute force. However, computer interfaces so far have mainly focused on interactions restrained to limited force and do not consider extreme physical and brutal interactions, such as those encountered in contact sports. We present an interactive demonstrator that aims to facilitate "Brute Force" activities to aid designers who want to leverage the physical and mental health benefits of such forceful interactions. Our prototype demonstrates that augmenting Brute Force with computing technology can be beneficial: unlike traditional contact sports experiences, it supports distributed participants. Our aim is to encourage designers to extend their supported interactions to include extreme forceful behaviors, which can contribute to general fitness and weight loss while at the same time allowing socializing in an entertaining sportive way.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Gibbs, Martin R. and Vetere, Frank (2008): Taxonomy of exertion games. In: Proceedings of OZCHI08 - the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 263-266. Available online

A new set of computationally-augmented games have emerged recently that require the user to move their body. These exertion games are believed to contribute to social, mental and in particular, physical benefits, marking a change in how we perceive computer gaming. However, although these games are a commercial success, research is lacking a theoretical understanding how to analyse existing and guide future designs. We present initial investigations towards a taxonomy of such exertion games with a focus on social aspects, based on work on traditional play and sports. Our contribution lays the foundation for the creation of a theoretical framework on exertion games, expanding our understanding of this exciting new area.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Davis, Hilary, Vetere, Frank, Ashkanasy, Shawn, Dyson, Gavin, Schofield, Penelope, Thompson, Kate, Withers, Giselle and Thomas, David (2008): Towards social connection for young people with cancer. In: Proceedings of OZCHI08 - the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 319-322. Available online

People with cancer have to contend with a variety of physical, emotional and social difficulties. Young people with cancer are often faced with the additional burden of isolation from their peers and social network. This paper outlines early results from a collaborative project seeking to use emerging technologies to develop and evaluate a peer-based social support system to support social connectivity amongst young people with cancer. We introduce an integrated service named MyTrac, which combines online social network applications and mobile broadband telephony. Seven young people (18-25yo) participated in the three month study. The study encompassed in-depth interview data, questionnaire data and an analysis of system audit logs, which documents participants' use and experience of the system. In this paper we highlight specific communications mediated by MyTrac, showing how they are a reflection of both the individual personalities of participants and a reflection of their cancer journey. We illustrate how these individual identities construct a collaborative identity for MyTrac, one which both encompasses and excludes particular types of interaction. We conclude by articulating some design considerations for social connectivity systems which seek to support young people with cancer.

© All rights reserved Davis et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Leong, Tuck, Howard, Steve and Vetere, Frank (2008): Take a chance on me: using randomness for the design of digital devices. In Interactions, 15 (3) pp. 16-19. Available online

 
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Mueller, Florian, Gibbs, Martin R., Vetere, Frank and Agamanolis, Stefan (2008): Design space of networked exertion games demonstrated by a three-way physical game based on Table Tennis. In Computers in Entertainment, 6 (3) . Available online

2007
 
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Graham, Connor, Rouncefield, Mark, Gibbs, Martin, Vetere, Frank and Cheverst, Keith (2007): How probes work. In: Proceedings of OZCHI07, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction November 28-30, 2007, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 29-37. Available online

'Cultural probes', since first being proposed and described by Bill Gaver and his colleagues, have been adapted and appropriated for a range of purposes within a variety of technology projects. In this paper we critically review different uses of Probes and discuss common aspects of different Probe variants. We also present and critique some of the debate around Probes through describing the detail of their use in two studies: The Digital Care Project (Lancaster University) and The Mediating Intimacy Project (University of Melbourne). We then reorient the discussion around Probes towards how probes work: both as interpretative fodder for social scientists and as a resource for 'designers'. Finally we discuss new possible directions for Probes as an approach and some of the challenges confronting Probes as an approach.

© All rights reserved Graham et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Davis, Hilary, Skov, Mikael B., Stougaard, Malthe and Vetere, Frank (2007): Virtual box: supporting mediated family intimacy through virtual and physical play. In: Proceedings of OZCHI07, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction November 28-30, 2007, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 151-159. Available online

Mediated intimacy is the phenomenon where humans use technologies to express, share, or communicate intimate feelings with each other. Typically, technologies supporting mediated intimacy encompass different characteristics than technologies designed to solve specific work-oriented tasks. This paper reports on the design, implementation and initial evaluation of Virtual Box. Virtual Box attempts to create a physical and engaging context in order to support reciprocal interactions with expressive content. An implemented version of Virtual Box is evaluated in a location-aware environment to evaluate the design ideas according to mediated family intimacy.

© All rights reserved Davis et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mueller, Florian, Agamanolis, Stefan, Vetere, Frank and Gibbs, Martin (2007): Brute force as input for networked gaming. In: Proceedings of OZCHI07, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction November 28-30, 2007, Adelaide, Australia. pp. 167-170. Available online

Bodily activities such as sports have many physical and mental health benefits. The associated physical interactions are often of an exertion character and facilitate the use of brute force and intense physical actions. On the other hand, computer interfaces so far have mainly focused on interactions that use limited force and often ignored the existence of extreme brutal interactions that can be encountered in everyday life, in particular in contact sports. We present our initial investigations on the concept of "Brute Force" interfaces in HCI and describe work-in-progress on a prototype that aims to facilitate brute force interactions. We hope with our work we can aid designers who want to leverage the physical and mental health benefits of such physically intense behaviors that people do exhibit in their lives.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ashkanasy, Shawn, Benda, Peter and Vetere, Frank (2007): Happy coincidences in designing for social connectedness and play through opportunistic image capture. In: Proceedings of DUX07 Designing for User eXperiences 2007. p. 4. Available online

We explore the opportunities and constraints for sharing personal and 'social group' communications through the use of multi-location interactive image displays and mobile image capture devices. Accordingly, we seek to provide a better understanding of the use of such technologies in supporting close tie relationships through the implementation of Collage, an interactive image display. Collage has been designed for immediate and lightweight modes of sharing though synchronous and asynchronous interaction between users and digital images/text. We report on the results of a technology probe with three related families over a ten-week period. Through interviews and participant data we provide a rich account of their use with the system, emergent practices and usability issues that enabled and limited their experience of sharing digital family images. We also show evidence for user driven resolution of ambiguities in the system as an enabler of new experiences -- What might be called "happy coincidences".

© All rights reserved Ashkanasy et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Vetere, Frank and Feltham, Frank G (2007): Bringing emotion and physicality to domestic ICTs: interview with Steven Kyffin. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 11 (5) pp. 335-337. Available online

 
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Feltham, Frank G, Vetere, Frank and Wensveen, Stephan (2007): Designing tangible artefacts for playful interactions and dialogues. In: Koskinen, Ilpo and Keinonen, Turkka (eds.) DPPI 2007 - Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces August 22-25, 2007, Helsinki, Finland. pp. 61-75. Available online

2006
 
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Leong, Tuck Wah, Vetere, Frank and Howard, Steve (2006): Randomness as a resource for design. In: Proceedings of DIS06: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2006. pp. 132-139. Available online

Randomness is being harnessed in the design of some interactive systems. This is observed in random blogs, random web searching, and in particular Apple's iPod Shuffle. Yet the role of randomness in design of interactive systems in not well understood. This paper reports on an empirical study examining the influence of randomness on the user experience of music listening. 113 instances of self-reporting were collected and analysed according to four themes: listening mode, content organisation, activities during listening, and affective outcomes. The analysis provides insights into how randomness is used to engender certain affective responses (such as feeling refreshed) by using various constraining techniques (such as playlists) whilst engaging in everyday activities (such as driving a car). The paper argues that randomness can be used as an innovative design resource for supporting rich and novel user experiences.

© All rights reserved Leong et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pardo, Sofia, Vetere, Frank and Howard, Steve (2006): Teachers' involvement in usability testing with children. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC06: Interaction Design and Children 2006. pp. 89-92. Available online

This paper describes the involvement of teachers as facilitators in user-based evaluation of educational software. Findings from a case study that compare the behaviour of teachers and designers during the evaluation indicate that there is no strong evidence to support the current practice of teachers' tangential participation in the evaluation of educational software. Further research is needed to better understand the role teachers can play in this type of evaluation so that their knowledge and experience can positively contribute to the evaluation process and outcomes, whilst retaining the children's valuable contribution.

© All rights reserved Pardo et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Vetere, Frank, Nolan, Mark and Raman, Raihaan Abdool (2006): Distributed hide-and-seek. In: Kjeldskov, Jesper and Paay, Jane (eds.) Proceedings of OZCHI06, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2006. pp. 325-328. Available online

Grandchildren and grandparents are often separated by distance. The decline of the extended family, the pursuit of careers, global migration, divorce and family disputes can contribute to grandchildren growing up without much contact with their grandparents. Technological advances can provide new and creative ways to bring separated grandparent and grandchildren closer. This paper reports on a technological prototype based on the traditional game of hide-and-seek that seeks to re-connect intergenerational relatives. The prototype exploits Bluetooth technologies to sense location and create a distributed hide-and-seek experience.

© All rights reserved Vetere et al. and/or their publisher

2005
 
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Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Kjeldskov, Jesper, Howard, Steve, Mueller, Florian, Pedell, Sonja, Mecoles, Karen and Bunyan, Marcus (2005): Mediating intimacy: designing technologies to support strong-tie relationships. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 471-480. Available online

Intimacy is a crucial element of domestic life, and many interactive technologies designed for other purposes have been appropriated for use within intimate relationships. However, there is a deficit in current understandings of how technologies are used within intimate relationships, and how to design technologies to support intimate acts. In this paper we report on work that has addressed these deficits. We used cultural probes and contextual interviews and other ethnographically informed techniques to investigate how interactive technologies are used within intimate relationships. From this empirical work we generated a thematic understanding of intimacy and the use of interactional technologies to support intimate acts. We used this understanding to inform the design of intimate technologies. A selection of our design concepts is also presented.

© All rights reserved Vetere et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapters:

User Experience and Experience Design: [/encyclopedia/user_experience_and_experience_design.html]

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapters:

User Experience and Experience Design: [/encyclopedia/user_experience_and_experience_design.html]

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Mueller, Florian, Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Kjeldskov, Jesper, Pedell, Sonja and Howard, Steve (2005): Hug over a distance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1673-1676. Available online

People in close relationships, who are separated by distance, often have difficulty expressing intimacy adequately. Based on the results of an ethnographic study with couples, a prototype was developed to test the feasibility of technology in the domain of intimacy. Hug Over a Distance is an air-inflatable vest that can be remotely triggered to create a sensation resembling a hug. Although the couples did not consider the vest to be useful in their daily lives, the prototype served to provoke and stimulate design ideas from the couples during participative design workshops. An additional and unexpected benefit was also found: the prototype enhanced the couples' understanding of the researchers' methods, suggesting that prototypes can serve as tools to make participatory design volunteers aware of their importance in academic research.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pedell, Sonja and Vetere, Frank (2005): Visualizing use context with picture scenarios in the design process. In: Proceedings of 7th conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2005. pp. 271-274. Available online

The context in which a device is used has a major impact on mobile device design. Despite this, there are few system design methods that assist user interface designers to represent use context in a useful and systematic manner throughout the whole design process. Current scenario-based design approaches are able to represent context, but still present a challenge to support a shared understanding of the rich context in which activities take place and in encoding dynamic use context due to time issues such as sequential and parallel actions. This paper reports on a method called Picture Scenarios. The method was used by four design teams whilst designing mobile information devices for use in a public square. Results show that picture scenarios provide an effective way of communicating and debating use context with design partners. The suggested format of the picture scenarios facilitates to represent use context during design activities in a systematic way. These scenarios are easy to create, easy to use, and capture important contextual details about activity that is difficult to represent otherwise.

© All rights reserved Pedell and Vetere and/or ACM Press

 
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Pardo, Sofia, Vetere, Frank and Howard, Steve (2005): Broadening stakeholder involvement in UCD: designers' perspectives on child-centred design. In: Proceedings of OZCHI05, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 1-9. Available online

We contribute to research and practice in User Centred Design (UCD) by arguing that, in certain contexts, the literal and restrictive interpretation of 'user' as hands-on user can be a hurdle to achieving development processes that are profoundly use-centred, and products that better support end users. Our example case focuses on Child Centred Design (CCD) and drawing on empirical data, we negate some popular concerns relating to the involvement of teachers in the child-designer equation, and suggest new structures for children and their teachers to jointly engage in UCD. The traditional power structure of adult-child or teacher-student, seen by previous authors as a barrier to involving teachers in CCD, is challenged and the need for an extension of the designer-child partnership to include a significant role for teachers is proposed. The implications for the wider UCD literature relate to a broadening of stakeholder involvement in design.

© All rights reserved Pardo et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Leong, Tuck W., Vetere, Frank and Howard, Steve (2005): The serendipity shuffle. In: Proceedings of OZCHI05, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 1-4. Available online

Recently, listening to music in shuffle mode has gained a strong following. Analysis of online data about the 'shuffle experience' reveals a range of rich and unusual user-experiences -- one in particular is Serendipity. Although serendipity is often imbued with 'magic' or regarded as a product of chance and luck, its effects can be inspirational and transformative. To date, little has been done to understand and characterise this experience. We sketch an initial understanding of serendipitous experience, and position it within a broader view of user experience. We also surface some implications for user-centred design processes.

© All rights reserved Leong et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Pedell, Sonja and Vetere, Frank (2005): Picture scenarios for representing use context in design. In: Proceedings of CHINZ05, the ACM SIGCHI New Zealand Chapters International Conference on Computer-Human Interaction 2005. pp. 17-18. Available online

The context of use has a major impact on mobile device design. However, there are few system design methods that assist user interface designers to represent use context in a useful and systematic manner throughout the design process. We report here on a method called Picture Scenarios that was used by four design teams whilst designing mobile information devices for a public square. Results show that Picture Scenarios helped the teams to better understand, negotiate and represent use context during their design activities.

© All rights reserved Pedell and Vetere and/or ACM Press

 
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Gibbs, Martin R., Vetere, Frank, Bunyan, Marcus and Howard, Steve (2005): SynchroMate: a phatic technology for mediating intimacy. In: Proceedings of the Conference on Designing for User Experiences DUX05 2005. p. 37. Available online

By and large interaction design has been concerned with information exchange -- technologies for the collection, processing and transmission of informational content. This design sketch discusses preliminary ideas about an alternative way to think about interactive technologies -- phatic technologies -- that are less concerned with capturing and communicating information and more about the establishment and maintenance of social connection. Drawing on insights and inspiration gleaned from a recent field-based study of the role of interactive technologies within intimate relationships we outline our preliminary ideas concerning technologies to support phatic interaction. Using the materials collected during our fieldwork as design inspirations, we developed design sketches for phatic technologies intended to support playful connection between intimates. One of these sketches -- SynchroMate -- is presented. SynchroMate is a phatic technology designed to mediate intimacy by affording serendipitous synchronous exchanges.

© All rights reserved Gibbs et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pedell, Sonja and Vetere, Frank (2005): Visualizing use context with picture scenarios in the design process. In: Tscheligi, Manfred, Bernhaupt, Regina and Mihalic, Kristijan (eds.) Proceedings of the 7th Conference on Human-Computer Interaction with Mobile Devices and Services - Mobile HCI 2005 September 19-22, 2005, Salzburg, Austria. pp. 271-274. Available online

 
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Kjeldskov, Jesper, Graham, Connor, Pedell, Sonja, Vetere, Frank, Howard, Steve, Balbo, S. and Davies, J. (2005): Evaluating the usability of a mobile guide: the influence of location, participants and resources. In Behaviour & IT, 24 (1) pp. 51-65. Available online

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
2004
 
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Po, Shirlina, Howard, Steve, Vetere, Frank and Skov, Mikael B. (2004): Heuristic Evaluation and Mobile Usability: Bridging the Realism Gap. In: Brewster, Stephen A. and Dunlop, Mark D. (eds.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - Mobile HCI 2004 - 6th International Symposium September 13-16, 2004, Glasgow, UK. pp. 49-60. Available online

2003
 
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Kjeldskov, Jesper, Howard, Steve, Murphy, John, Carroll, Jennie, Vetere, Frank and Graham, Connor (2003): Designing TramMatena Context-aware mobile system supporting use of public transportation. In: Proceedings of DUX03: Designing for User Experiences 2003. pp. 1-4. Available online

We describe the design of a mobile information service that provides users with a route-planning tool for the tram-based public transport system of Melbourne, Australia. The design sketches for TramMate represent early iterations of an ongoing design process based on data from field studies on the use of transportation by business employees who, during a typical workday, have to attend appointments at different physical locations. TramMate supports this activity by keeping track of contextual factors such as the user's physical location, upcoming appointments, and real-time travel information. The design is integrated with an electronic calendar and alerts the user when it is necessary to commence the journey.

© All rights reserved Kjeldskov et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Vetere, Frank and Howard, Steve (2003): Layering a Minimal Interface. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 415.

2002
 
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Howard, Steve, Carroll, John M., Murphy, J., Peck, J. and Vetere, Frank (2002): Provoking Innovation: Acting-out in Contextual Scenarios. In: Faulkner, Xristine, Finlay, Janet and Détienne, Françoise (eds.) Proceedings of the HCI02 Conference on People and Computers XVI September 18-20, 2002, Pisa, Italy. pp. 175-192.

 
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Carroll, Jenny M., Howard, Steve, Vetere, Frank, Peck, Jane and Murphy, John (2002): Just What Do the Youth of Today Want? Technology Appropriation by Young People. In: HICSS 2002 2002. p. 131. Available online

 
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