Publication statistics

Pub. period:1996-2011
Pub. count:15
Number of co-authors:25



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Paul P. Maglio:7
Eben M. Haber:5
John Bailey:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Eser Kandogan's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ben Shneiderman:225
Shumin Zhai:67
Thomas P. Moran:66
 
 
 

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Eser Kandogan

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Current place of employment:
IBM

Eser Kandogan, Ph.D., is a research staff member at IBM Almaden Research Center, Californa. His interests include human interaction with complex systems, policy-based system management, ethnographic studies of system administrators, information visualization, and end-user programming.

 

Publications by Eser Kandogan (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Kandogan, Eser, Kim, Juho, Moran, Thomas P. and Pedemonte, Pablo (2011): How a freeform spatial interface supports simple problem solving tasks. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 925-934. Available online

We developed DataBoard, a freeform spatial interface, to support users in simple problem solving tasks. To develop a deeper understanding of the role of space and the tradeoffs between freeform and structured interaction styles in problem solving tasks, we conducted a controlled user study comparing the DataBoard with a spreadsheet and analyzed video data in detail. Beyond improvements in task performance and memory recall, our observations reveal that freeform interfaces can support users in a variety of ways: representing problems flexibly, developing strategies, executing strategies incrementally, tracking problem state easily, reducing mental computation, and verifying solutions perceptually. The spreadsheet also had advantages, and we discuss the tradeoffs.

© All rights reserved Kandogan et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Kandogan, Eser, Maglio, Paul P., Haber, Eben M. and Bailey, John H. (2009): Scripting practices in complex systems management. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Computer Human Interaction for the Management of Information Technology 2009. p. 2. Available online

System administrators are end-users too. And as end-users, they develop tools, create web pages, write command-line scripts, use spreadsheets, and repurpose existing tools. In short, they engage in end-user programming activities in support of their systems management work. We examined system administrator practices in software tool development, operations, and maintenance based on ethnographic field studies at service delivery centers and data centers across the United States. Our findings suggest that software practices were mostly informal and collaborative and mixed within formal change processes; tool development and debugging were interleaved with tool use and maintenance as they interacted with live systems; and the complexity of large-scale systems and the risks involved in changing live and critical systems put increased demands on system administrators. We argue that system administrators might benefit from certain software engineering methodologies such as agile software development and software modeling.

© All rights reserved Kandogan et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Frisch, AEleen, Kandogan, Eser, Lutters, Wayne G., Thornton, James D. and Mouloua, Mustapha (eds.) CHIMIT 2008 - Proceedings of the 2nd ACM Symposium on Computer Human Interaction for Management of Information Technology November 14-15, 2008, San Diego, California, USA.

 
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Kandogan, Eser, Bailey, John, Maglio, Paul P. and Haber, Eben M. (2008): Policy-based IT automation: the role of human judgment. In: Frisch, AEleen, Kandogan, Eser, Lutters, Wayne G., Thornton, James D. and Mouloua, Mustapha (eds.) CHIMIT 2008 - Proceedings of the 2nd ACM Symposium on Computer Human Interaction for Management of Information Technology November 14-15, 2008, San Diego, California, USA. p. 9. Available online

 
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Kandogan, Eser, Bailey, John, Maglio, Paul P. and Haber, Eben (2008): Policy-based IT automation: the role of human judgment. In: Proceedings of the 2008 Symposium on Computer Human Interaction for the Management of Information Technology 2008. p. 9. Available online

Policy-based automation is emerging as a viable approach to IT systems management, codifying high-level business goals into executable specifications for governing IT operations. Little is known, however, about how policies are actually made, used, and maintained in practice. Here, we report studies of policy use in IT service delivery. We found that although policies often make explicit statements, much is deliberately left implicit, with correct interpretation and execution depending critically on human judgment.

© All rights reserved Kandogan et al. and/or ACM Press

2007
 
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Little, Greg, Lau, Tessa A., Cypher, Allen, Lin, James, Haber, Eben M. and Kandogan, Eser (2007): Koala: capture, share, automate, personalize business processes on the web. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 943-946. Available online

We present Koala, a system that enables users to capture, share, automate, and personalize business processes on the web. Koala is a collaborative programming-by-demonstration system that records, edits, and plays back user interactions as pseudo-natural language scripts that are both human- and machine-interpretable. Unlike previous programming by demonstration systems, Koala leverages sloppy programming that interprets pseudo-natural language instructions (as opposed to formal syntactic statements) in the context of a given web page's elements and actions. Koala scripts are automatically stored in the Koalescence wiki, where a community of users can share, run, and collaboratively develop their "how-to" knowledge. Koala also takes advantage of corporate and personal data stores to automatically generalize and instantiate user-specific data, so that scripts created by one user are automatically personalized for others. Our initial experiences suggest that Koala is surprisingly effective at interpreting instructions originally written for people.

© All rights reserved Little et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kandogan, Eser and Jones, Patricia M. (eds.) CHIMIT 2007 - Proceedings of the 1st ACM Symposium on Computer Human Interaction for Management of Information Technology March 30-31, 2007, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA.

 
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Bailey, John, Kandogan, Eser, Haber, Eben M. and Maglio, Paul P. (2007): Activity-based management of IT service delivery. In: Kandogan, Eser and Jones, Patricia M. (eds.) CHIMIT 2007 - Proceedings of the 1st ACM Symposium on Computer Human Interaction for Management of Information Technology March 30-31, 2007, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. p. 5. Available online

 
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Bailey, John, Kandogan, Eser, Haber, Eben and Maglio, Paul P. (2007): Activity-based management of IT service delivery. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Symposium on Computer Human Interaction for the Management of Information Technology 2007. p. 5. Available online

Growth, adaptability, innovation, and cost control are leading concerns of businesses, especially with respect to use of information technology (IT). Though standards such as the Information Technology Infrastructure Library (ITIL) offer the potential for cost savings through the use of formal processes and best practices, such top-down approaches tend to be either highlevel - often far removed from the actual work - or low-level - often inflexible given the rapid pace of technology and market change. We conducted field studies to examine work practices in IT service delivery. Our results suggest that unstructured work activities comprise a significant and vital portion of the overall work done by people in IT service delivery. These activities include negotiating work items and schedules, seeking and providing information and expertise, and using and sharing custom tools and practices. Unstructured activities are conducted in parallel to formal, structured IT service processes, but are not well supported by existing integrated tooling. Thus, they are not easily accounted for and rarely result in reusable assets or feedback to improve the formal IT processes. Based on these findings, we propose an administrator workspace aimed specifically at blending structured and unstructured work activities to support effective, reusable, and quantifiable IT service delivery.

© All rights reserved Bailey et al. and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Kandogan, Eser, Haber, Eben, Barrett, Rob, Cypher, Allen, Maglio, Paul P. and Zhao, Haixia (2005): A1: end-user programming for web-based system administration. In: Proceedings of the 2005 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2005. pp. 211-220. Available online

System administrators work with many different tools to manage and fix complex hardware and software infrastructure in a rapidly paced work environment. Through extensive field studies, we observed that they often build and share custom tools for specific tasks that are not supported by vendor tools. Recent trends toward web-based management consoles offer many advantages but put an extra burden on system administrators, as customization requires web programming, which is beyond the skills of many system administrators. To meet their needs, we developed A1, a spreadsheet-based environment with a task-specific system-administration language for quickly creating small tools or migrating existing scripts to run as web portlets. Using A1, system administrators can build spreadsheets to access remote and heterogeneous systems, gather and integrate status data, and orchestrate control of disparate systems in a uniform way. A preliminary user study showed that in just a few hours, system administrators can learn to use A1 to build relatively complex tools from scratch.

© All rights reserved Kandogan et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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Barrett, Rob, Kandogan, Eser, Maglio, Paul P., Haber, Eben M., Takayama, Leila A. and Prabaker, Madhu (2004): Field studies of computer system administrators: analysis of system management tools and practices. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 388-395. Available online

Computer system administrators are the unsung heroes of the information age, working behind the scenes to configure, maintain, and troubleshoot the computer infrastructure that underlies much of modern life. However, little can be found in the literature about the practices and problems of these highly specialized computer users. We conducted a series of field studies in large corporate data centers, observing organizations, work practices, tools, and problem-solving strategies of system administrators. We found system administrators operate within large-scale, complex environments that present significant technical, social, cognitive, and business challenges. In this paper, we describe system administrator tool use in critical, high-cost, labor-intensive work through observational, survey, and interview data. We discuss our findings concerning administrator needs for coordinating work, maintaining situation awareness, planning and rehearsing complex procedures, building tools, and supporting complicated interleaved workflows.

© All rights reserved Barrett et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Zhai, Shumin, Kandogan, Eser, Smith, Barton A. and Selker, Ted (1999): In Search of the 'Magic Carpet': Design and Experimentation of a Bimanual 3D Navigation Interface. In J. Vis. Lang. Comput., 10 (1) pp. 3-17.

1997
 
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Kandogan, Eser and Shneiderman, Ben (1997): Elastic Windows: Evaluation of Multi-Window Operations. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 250-257. Available online

Most windowing systems follow the independent overlapping windows approach, which emerged as an answer to the needs of the 1980s' technology. Due to advances in computers and display technology, and increased information needs, modern users demand more functionality from window management systems. We proposed Elastic Windows with improved spatial layout and rapid multi-window operations as an alternative to current window management strategies for efficient personal role management [12]. In this approach, multi-window operations are achieved by issuing operations on window groups hierarchically organized in a space-filling tiled layout. This paper describes the Elastic Windows interface briefly and then presents a study comparing user performance with Elastic Windows and traditional window management techniques for 2, 6, and 12 window situations. Elastic Windows users had statistically significantly faster performance for all 6 and 12 window situations, for task environment setup, task environment switching, and task execution. For some tasks there was a ten-fold speed-up in performance. These results suggest promising possibilities for multiple window operations and hierarchical nesting, which can be applied to the next generation of tiled as well as overlapped window managers.

© All rights reserved Kandogan and Shneiderman and/or ACM Press

 
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Kandogan, Eser and Shneiderman, Ben (1997): Elastic Windows: A Hierarchical Multi-Window World-Wide Web Browser. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 169-177. Available online

The World-Wide Web is becoming an invaluable source for the information needs of many users. However, current browsers are still primitive, in that they do not support many of the navigation needs of users, as indicated by user studies. They do not provide an overview and a sense of location in the information structure being browsed. Also they do not facilitate organization and filtering of information nor aid users in accessing already visited pages without high cognitive demands. In this paper, a new browsing interface is proposed with multiple hierarchical windows and efficient multiple window operations. It provides a flexible environment where users can quickly organize, filter, and restructure the information on the screen as they reformulate their goals. Overviews can give the user a sense of location in the browsing history as well as provide fast access to a hierarchy of pages.

© All rights reserved Kandogan and Shneiderman and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Kandogan, Eser and Shneiderman, Ben (1996): Elastic windows: improved spatial layout and rapid multiple window operations. In: Catarci, Tiziana, Costabile, Maria Francesca, Levialdi, Stefano and Santucci, Giuseppe (eds.) AVI 1996 - Proceedings of the workshop on Advanced visual interfaces May 27-29, 1996, Gubbio, Italy. pp. 29-38. Available online

 
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