Publication statistics

Pub. period:1991-2009
Pub. count:17
Number of co-authors:20



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

William C. Janssen:
Ashok C. Popat:
Adam Perer:

 

 

Productive colleagues

Eric A. Bier's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Bill Buxton:78
Stuart K. Card:74
Terry Winograd:59
 
 
 

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Eric A. Bier

Has also published under the name of:
"Eric Bier"

 

Publications by Eric A. Bier (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Bier, Eric A., Billman, Dorrit, Dent, Kyle and Card, Stuart K. (2009): Collaborative Sensemaking Tools for Task Forces. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 53rd Annual Meeting 2009. pp. 439-443. Available online

Our work addresses the needs of multiple information workers collaborating on joint projects, which typically require finding, analyzing, and synthesizing information from heterogeneous sources. We report on iterative design, implementation, and assessment of collaborative tools for sensemaking tasks. Our goal is flexible, lightweight tools that both facilitate the activities done individually and lower the costs of effective collaboration. We suggest several approaches to enhance such collaborative sensemaking tools. These approaches include explicit representation of multiple team activities, integrated support for synchronous communication, and views of collected information that are tuned to both the reading and organizing phases of sensemaking. We present an integrated pair of tools, ContextBar and ContextBook, which illustrate these approaches, and describe the results from a formative evaluation of these tools.

© All rights reserved Bier et al. and/or their publisher

2007
 
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Billman, Dorrit and Bier, Eric A. (2007): Medical sensemaking with entity workspace. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 229-232. Available online

Knowledge workers making sense of a topic divide their time among activities including searching for information, reading, and taking notes. We have built a software system that supports and integrates these activities. To test its effectiveness, we conducted a study where subjects used it to perform medical question-answering tasks. Initial results indicate that subjects could use the system, but that the nature of this use depended on the subject's overall question-answering strategy. Two dominant strategies emerged that we call the Reader and Searcher strategies.

© All rights reserved Billman and Bier and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Bier, Eric A. and Perer, Adam (2005): Icon abacus: positional display of document attributes. In: JCDL05: Proceedings of the 5th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2005. pp. 289-290. Available online

This paper presents icon abacus, a space-efficient technique for displaying document attributes by automatic positioning of document icons. It displays the value of an attribute by using position on a single axis, allowing the other axis to display different metadata simultaneously The layout is stable enough to support navigation using spatial memory.

© All rights reserved Bier and Perer and/or ACM Press

 
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Bier, Eric A. and Perer, Adam (2005): Icon abacus and ghost icons. In: JCDL05: Proceedings of the 5th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2005. p. 404. Available online

We present two techniques that make document collection visualizations more informative. Icon abacus uses the horizontal position of icon groups to communicate document attributes. Ghost icons show linked documents by adding temporary icons and by highlighting or dimming existing ones.

© All rights reserved Bier and Perer and/or ACM Press

 
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Good, Lance, Popat, Ashok C., Janssen, William C. and Bier, Eric A. (2005): A fluid treemap interface for personal digital libraries. In: JCDL05: Proceedings of the 5th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2005. p. 408. Available online

The UC system employs hybrid quantum/continuous treemaps for fluidly interacting with documents in a personal digital library. By incorporating a document reader application within the visualization workspace, UC supports multi-document reading tasks that have been traditionally accomplished by laying out documents on a physical desk. One of the overall goals of the system is to eliminate the boundary between acquiring and using documents.

© All rights reserved Good et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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Bier, Eric A., Good, Lance, Popat, Kris and Newberger, Alan (2004): A document corpus browser for in-depth reading. In: JCDL04: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2004. pp. 87-96. Available online

Software tools, including Web browsers, e-books, electronic document formats, search engines, and digital libraries are changing the way people read, making it easier for them to find and view documents. However, while these tools provide significant help with short-term reading projects involving small numbers of documents, they provide less help with longer-term reading projects, in which a topic is to be understood in depth by reading many documents. For such projects, readers must find and manage many documents and citations, remember what has been read, and prioritize what to read next. This paper describes three integrated software tools that facilitate in-depth reading. A first tool extracts citation information from documents. A second finds on-line documents from their citations. The last is a document corpus browser that uses a zoomable user interface to show a corpus at multiple granularities while supporting reading tasks that take days, weeks, or longer. We describe these tools and the design principles that motivated them.

© All rights reserved Bier et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bier, Eric A., Popat, Kris, Good, Lance and Newberger, Alan (2004): Zoomable user interface for in-depth reading. In: JCDL04: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2004. p. 424. Available online

The Instant Bookplex system includes a zoomable user interface (ZUI) for navigating through a spatial representation of a document collection. This ZUI supports extended reading in the collection using semantic zooming, graphical presentation of metadata, animated transitions, and an integrated reading tool It helps users find and re-find documents, choose good documents to read next, and navigate between documents.

© All rights reserved Bier et al. and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Fass, Adam M., Bier, Eric A. and Adar, Eyton (2000): PicturePiper: Using a Re-Configurable Pipeline to Find Images on the Web. In: Ackerman, Mark S. and Edwards, Keith (eds.) Proceedings of the 13th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 2000, San Diego, California, United States. pp. 51-62. Available online

1997
 
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Cousins, Steve, Paepcke, Andreas, Winograd, Terry, Bier, Eric A. and Pier, Ken (1997): The Digital Library Integrated Task Environment (DLITE). In: DL97: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Conference on Digital Libraries 1997. pp. 142-151. Available online

We describe a case study in the design of a user interface to a digital library. Our design stems from a vision of a library as a channel to the vast array of digital information and document services that are becoming available. Based on published studies of library use and on scenarios, we developed a metaphor called workcenters, which are customized for users' tasks. Due to our scenarios and to prior work in the CHI community, we chose a direct-manipulation realization of the metaphor. Our system, called DLITE, is designed to make it easy for users to interact with many different services while focusing on a task. Users have reacted favorably to the interface design in pilot testing. We conclude by describing our approaches to this problem.

© All rights reserved Cousins et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bier, Eric A., Stone, Maureen C. and Pier, Ken (1997): Enhanced Illustration Using Magic Lens Filters. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 17 (6) pp. 62-70. Available online

1994
 
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Stone, Maureen C., Fishkin, Ken and Bier, Eric A. (1994): The Movable Filter as a User Interface Tool. In: Adelson, Beth, Dumais, Susan and Olson, Judith S. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 94 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 24-28, 1994, Boston, Massachusetts. pp. 306-312. Available online

Magic Lens filters are a new user interface tool that combine an arbitrarily-shaped region with an operator that changes the view of objects viewed through that region. These tools can be interactively positioned over on-screen applications much as a magnifying glass is moved over a newspaper. They can be used to help the user understand various types of information, from text documents to scientific visualizations. Because these filters are movable and apply to only part of the screen, they have a number of advantages over traditional window-wide viewing modes: they employ an attractive metaphor based on physical lenses, show a modified view in the context of the original view, limit clutter to a small region, allow easy construction of visual macros and provide a uniform paradigm that can be extended across different types of information and applications. This paper describes these advantages in more detail and illustrates them with examples of magic lens filters in use over a variety of applications.

© All rights reserved Stone et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bier, Eric A., Stone, Maureen C., Fishkin, Ken, Buxton, Bill and Baudel, Thomas (1994): A Taxonomy of See-Through Tools. In: Adelson, Beth, Dumais, Susan and Olson, Judith S. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 94 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 24-28, 1994, Boston, Massachusetts. pp. 358-364. Available online

In current interfaces, users select objects, apply operations, and change viewing parameters in distinct steps that require switching attention among several screen areas. Our See-Through Interface software reduces steps by locating tools on a transparent sheet that can be moved over applications with one hand using a blackball, while the other hand controls a mouse cursor. The user clicks through a tool onto application objects, simultaneously selecting an operation and an operand. Tools may include graphical filters that display a customized view of application objects. Compared to traditional interactors, these tools save steps, require no permanent screen space, reduce temporal modes, apply to multiple applications, and facilitate customization. This paper presents a taxonomy of see-through tools that considers variations in each of the steps they perform. As examples, we describe particular see-through tools that perform graphical editing and text editing operations.

© All rights reserved Bier et al. and/or ACM Press

1992
 
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Bier, Eric A., Freeman, Steve and Pier, Ken (1992): MMM: The Multi-Device Multi-User Multi-Editor. In: Bauersfeld, Penny, Bennett, John and Lynch, Gene (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 92 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference June 3-7, 1992, Monterey, California. pp. 645-646. Available online

 
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Bier, Eric A. (1992): EmbeddedButtons: Supporting Buttons in Documents. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 10 (4) pp. 381-407. Available online

EmbeddedButtons is a library of routines and a runtime kernel that support the integration of buttons into document media, including text and graphics. Existing document editors can be modified to participate in this open architecture with the addition of a few simple routines. Unlike many button systems that insert special button objects into document media, this system supports turning existing documents objects into buttons. As a consequence, buttons inherit all of the attributes of normal document objects, and the appearance of buttons can be edited using operations already familiar to users. Facilities are provided for linking buttons to application windows so that documents can serve as application control panels. Hence, user interface designers can lay out control panels using familiar document editors rather than special-purpose tools. Three classes of buttons have been implemented, including buttons that pop up a menu and buttons that store and display the value of a variable. New button classes, editors, and applications can be added at run time. Two editors, one for text and one for graphics, currently participate in the architecture.

© All rights reserved Bier and/or ACM Press

1991
 
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Bier, Eric A. and Pier, Ken (1991): Documents as User Interfaces. In: Robertson, Scott P., Olson, Gary M. and Olson, Judith S. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 91 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 28 - June 5, 1991, New Orleans, Louisiana. pp. 443-444. Available online

 
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Bier, Eric A. (1991): EmbeddedButtons: Documents as User Interfaces. In: Rhyne, James R. (ed.) Proceedings of the 4th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology Hilton Head, South Carolina, United States, 1991, Hilton Head, South Carolina, United States. pp. 45-53. Available online

Recent electronic document editors and hypertext systems allow users to create customized user interfaces by adding user-pressable buttons to on-screen documents. Positioning these buttons is easy because users are already familiar with the use of document editors. Unfortunately, the resulting user interfaces often exits only in stand-alone document systems, making it hard to integrate them with other applications. Furthermore, because buttons are usually treated as special document objects, they cannot take advantage of document editor formatting and layout capabilities to create their appearance. This paper describes the EmbeddedButtons architecture, which makes it easy to integrate buttons into documents and to use the resulting documents for a variety of user interface types. EmbeddedButtons allows arbitrary document elements to behave as buttons. Documents can be linked to application windows to serve as application control panels. Buttons can store and display application state to serve as mode indicators. New button classes, editors, and applications can be added dynamically.

© All rights reserved Bier and/or ACM Press

 
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Bier, Eric A. and Freeman, Steve (1991): MMM: A User Interface Architecture for Shared Editors on a Single Screen. In: Rhyne, James R. (ed.) Proceedings of the 4th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology Hilton Head, South Carolina, United States, 1991, Hilton Head, South Carolina, United States. pp. 79-86. Available online

There is a growing interest in software applications that allow several users to simultaneously interact with computer applications either in the same room or at a distance. Much early work focused on sharing existing single-user applications across a network. The Multi-Device Multi-User Multi-Editor (MMM) project is developing a user interface and software architecture to support a new generation of editors specifically designed to be used by groups, including groups who share a single screen. Each user has his or her own modes, style settings, insertion points, and feedback. Screen space is conserved by reducing the size and number of on-screen tools. The editors use per-user data structures to respond to multi-user input.

© All rights reserved Bier and Freeman and/or ACM Press

 
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