Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2010
Pub. count:12
Number of co-authors:19



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Janet C. Read:7
Russell Beale:3
Javier Marco:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Emanuela Mazzone's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Russell Beale:51
Janet C. Read:35
Narcis Pares:16
 
 
 

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Emanuela Mazzone

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Publications by Emanuela Mazzone (bibliography)

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2010
 
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Read, Janet C., Fitton, Daniel and Mazzone, Emanuela (2010): Using obstructed theatre with child designers to convey requirements. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4063-4068.

This paper describes the use of obstructed theatre as a novel design method for the elicitation of ideas from children for the design of a new mobile product. Obstructed theatre has previously been used, in this same context with adults, but this is the first paper that outlines its use with children. The paper describes the initial ideas for the script for the theatre and evaluates its use. It is shown that the method can be useful and it specifically conveyed the idea of portability and mobility but was less effective at conveying the more complex interactive ideas. Specifically the paper outlines the origins of the method, presents some reflection on the usefulness of the method and suggests how it can be used with other contexts.

© All rights reserved Read et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mazzone, Emanuela, Iivari, Netta, Tikkanen, Ruut, Read, Janet C. and Beale, Russell (2010): Considering context, content, management, and engagement in design activities with children. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC10 Interaction Design and Children 2010. pp. 108-117.

In this paper we describe three different design activities carried out for the design of a music device for children. The studies involved researchers from different disciplines as well as children from different schools. We reflected on what happened during the design activities and we looked at the outputs produced by the children in order to understand the feasibility of the activities from two perspectives: whether they contributed to the design of the product and whether they suitably involved children in the process. In relation to the design of the product, information gathered during the activities was associated either to the context or to the content of the design. In relation to the design method, the study enabled us to identify aspects of both children's' engagement and researchers' management that affected the success of the activities. We used these factors to create what we consider a useful framework for meaningful design activities.

© All rights reserved Mazzone et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Blanco, Jos Mara, Landry, Pascal, C., A Sebastin Mealla, Mazzone, Emanuela and Pares, Narcis (2010): PIPLEX: tangible experience in an augmented reality video game. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC10 Interaction Design and Children 2010. pp. 274-277.

In this paper we describe a work in progress of a mixed-reality framework based on tangible interface applied to a video game designed for children. This video game, called PIPLEX, lays on the ability of the users to solve a puzzle through modelling malleable materials (namely plasticine and cardboard). We explain the implementation of PIPLEX, its interaction rules and the physical set-up. Additionally, we suggest future applications that can be developed in the context of our framework.

© All rights reserved Blanco et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Marco, Javier, Cerezo, Eva, Baldasarri, Sandra, Mazzone, Emanuela and Read, Janet C. (2009): User-oriented design and tangible interaction for kindergarten children. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC09 Interaction Design and Children 2009. pp. 190-193.

This paper describes a tabletop prototype that allows kindergarten children to take the benefits of the new pedagogical possibilities that tangible interaction and tabletop technologies offer to manipulative learning. After analyzing children's cognitive and psychomotorial skills, we have designed and tuned a prototype game suitable for children aged 3 to 4 years old. Our prototype uniquely combines low cost tangible interaction and tabletop technology with tutored learning. The design has been based on observations of the children using the technology, letting them freely play with the application during three play sessions. These observational sessions informed the design decisions for the game whilst also confirming the children's enjoyment with the prototype.

© All rights reserved Marco et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Marco, Javier, Cerezo, Eva, Baldassarri, Sandra, Mazzone, Emanuela and Read, Janet C. (2009): Bringing tabletop technologies to kindergarten children. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 103-111.

Taking computer technology away from the desktop and into a more physical, manipulative space, is known that provide many benefits and is generally considered to result in a system that is easier to learn and more natural to use. This paper describes a design solution that allows kindergarten children to take the benefits of the new pedagogical possibilities that tangible interaction and tabletop technologies offer for manipulative learning. After analysis of children's cognitive and psychomotor skills, we have designed and tuned a prototype game that is suitable for children aged 3 to 4 years old. Our prototype uniquely combines low cost tangible interaction and tabletop technology with tutored learning. The design has been based on the observation of children using the technology, letting them freely play with the application during three play sessions. These observational sessions informed the design decisions for the game whilst also confirming the children's enjoyment of the prototype.

© All rights reserved Marco et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Mazzone, Emanuela, Read, Janet C. and Beale, Russell (2008): Design with and for disaffected teenagers. In: Proceedings of the Fifth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 290-297.

This paper describes how an e-learning product for teenagers was developed using design sessions based on a participatory design approach. The product, in the form of a computer game, is the outcome of a project that aims to improve teenagers' emotional intelligence. The specific user group is from institutes for pupils that had previously been excluded from mainstream education. The novelty in the approach is that participants were involved in designing a tool that was intended to modify their emotional behaviour -- for this discussion, it is the participation in the process that is critical, less so the end product. The project and the design approaches are described and the participatory activity is reflected on. The benefits resulting from the design sessions were bi-directional: the engagement with the prospective users was valuable both for the actual contribution to the product design and as an experience for the participants.

© All rights reserved Mazzone et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mazzone, Emanuela, Read, Janet and Beale, Russell (2008): Understanding Children's Contributions during Informant Design. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 61-64.

In this paper we describe the analysis of the outcomes of a design session with children. Designing with children is often considered an inspirational activity mainly useful for the designers to get first hand insights of the users' world. For this study we attempt an analytical approach to the results of a specific design session where children used low-tech prototyping to design the content of an interactive interface for a museum context. This analysis helped to inform the design of the specific product but was also useful to investigate methods of interpreting qualitative data of this kind. The analysis showed that the design method employed enabled the children to consider design features but also demonstrated that in some areas the children had only a limited understanding. Results from this work will be used to improve, and describe future design sessions.

© All rights reserved Mazzone et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mazzone, Emanuela (2008): Determining Value in Informant Design with Children. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 251-252.

This research looks at design methods for children technologies. It takes a User-Centred Design approach, where the involvement of the users is essential to the achievement of satisfactory products.

© All rights reserved Mazzone and/or his/her publisher

2007
 
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Xu, Diana, Read, Janet C., Mazzone, Emanuela, MacFarlane, Stuart and Brown, Martin (2007): Evaluation of Tangible User Interfaces (TUIs) for and with Children - Methods and Challenges. In: Jacko, Julie A. (ed.) HCI International 2007 - 12th International Conference - Part II July 22-27, 2007, Beijing, China. pp. 1008-1017.

2006
 
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Kelly, S. Rebecca, Mazzone, Emanuela, Horton, Matthew and Read, Janet C. (2006): Bluebells: a design method for child-centred product development. In: Proceedings of the Fourth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2006. pp. 361-368.

This paper presents Bluebells, a design method that balances child-centred design with expert design in a progressive approach that marries the best of both disciplines. The method is described in the context of a museum technologies project. Bluebells comprises several new design techniques; these are evaluated and discussed in the paper. The authors conclude with guidelines for future use of the Bluebells method including the importance of providing a context for design partners and allowing them to express their ideas in ways they are comfortable with.

© All rights reserved Kelly et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Xu, Diana, Mazzone, Emanuela and MacFarlane, Stuart (2006): In search for evaluation methods for children's tangible technology. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC06: Interaction Design and Children 2006. pp. 171-172.

We selected some user-based evaluation methods for use with school children to evaluate our Tangible User Interface (TUI) prototype. We aimed to evaluate mainly the usability of the prototype, and also fun and educational design. The evaluations were carried out in different environments. We found location of the study and disposition of the space play important roles; selection of the participants is also important.

© All rights reserved Xu et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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Mazzone, Emanuela, Horton, Matthew and Read, Janet (2004): Requirements for a multimedia museum environment. In: Proceedings of the Third Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction October 23-27, 2004, Tampere, Finland. pp. 421-424.

In this paper we describe a two-part study that was used to establish the requirements for an interactive museum environment for children aged between 5 and 10. The paper outlines how the low-tech interactive environment currently used in the museum was used to produce ideas for a technology-enhanced environment.

© All rights reserved Mazzone et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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03 Nov 2010: Modified
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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/emanuela_mazzone.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2010
Pub. count:12
Number of co-authors:19



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Janet C. Read:7
Russell Beale:3
Javier Marco:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Emanuela Mazzone's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Russell Beale:51
Janet C. Read:35
Narcis Pares:16
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 2
90% booked. Starts in 5 days
go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
89% booked. Starts in 6 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading