Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2009
Pub. count:9
Number of co-authors:10



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Pamela Briggs:4
Linda Little:4
Peter Harris:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Elizabeth Sillence's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Abigail Sellen:81
Eamonn O'Neill:31
Vassilis Kostakos:20
 
 
 
Jul 13

A general principle for all user interface design is to go through all of your design elements and remove them one at a time. If the design works as well without a certain design element, kill it.

-- Jakob Nielsen, Designing Web Usability, p. 22.

 
 

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Elizabeth Sillence

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Publications by Elizabeth Sillence (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Little, Linda, Sillence, Elizabeth and Briggs, Pam (2009): Ubiquitous systems and the family: thoughts about the networked home. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2009. p. 6.

Developments in ubiquitous and pervasive computing herald a future in which computation is embedded into our daily lives. Such a vision raises important questions about how people, especially families, will be able to engage with and trust such systems whilst maintaining privacy and individual boundaries. To begin to address such issues, we have recently conducted a wide reaching study eliciting trust, privacy and identity concerns about pervasive computing. Over three hundred UK citizens participated in 38 focus groups. The groups were shown Videotaped Activity Scenarios [11] depicting pervasive or ubiquitous computing applications in a number of contexts including shopping. The data raises a number of important issues from a family perspective in terms of access, control, responsibility, benefit and complexity. Also findings highlight the conflict between increased functionality and the subtle social interactions that sustain family bonds. We present a Pre-Concept Evaluation Tool (PRECET) for use in design and implementation of ubicomp systems.

© All rights reserved Little et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Little, Linda, Sillence, Elizabeth, Sellen, Abigail and Taylor, Alex (2009): The family and communication technologies. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 67 (2) pp. 125-127.

 
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Pirhonen, Antti and Sillence, Elizabeth (2009): Getting Connected: At What Cost? Some Ethical Issues in Mobile HCI. In International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, 1 (3) pp. 9-17.

The large scale deployment of mobile applications inevitably impacts upon our culture as a whole and affects more intimately our daily lives. Not all of these effects are desirable. In a market economy, ethical issues are not the most important drivers in the development of technology. In this article, we ask whether the mobile human-computer interaction community could take an active role in discussing ethical issues. In so doing we could focus our attention on developing technology for 'human beings' rather than fine tuning our emerging gadgets.

© All rights reserved Pirhonen and Sillence and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Sillence, Elizabeth, Little, Linda and Briggs, Pam (2008): E-health. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 179-180.

E-health refers to information and health services delivered via the Internet or related technologies. Whilst usage statistics suggests that the internet is an e-health success story issues surrounding quality of information, user interaction and personalization raise important questions for researchers and designers alike. The move towards ubiquitous computing accentuates these concerns and highlights the relevance of trust, privacy and disclosure to the debate. This one-day workshop will bring together an interdisciplinary group of researchers and practitioners to discuss how the fields of human computer interaction and applied psychology can address the issues raised by the growing domain of e-health.

© All rights reserved Sillence et al. and/or their publisher

2007
 
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Sillence, Elizabeth, Briggs, Pamela, Harris, Peter and Fishwick, Lesley (2007): Health Websites that people can trust -- the case of hypertension. In Interacting with Computers, 19 (1) pp. 32-42.

Traditionally health advice has been anchored in face-to-face settings but increasingly patients are using the Internet for their health advice needs. This means that patients are now offered inconsistent advice from a range of sources and must determine which sites to trust and which to reject. To understand how consumers make these choices, 13 participants diagnosed with hypertension took part in a longitudinal study in which they searched for information and advice relevant to their condition. A content analysis of the group discussions revealed support for a staged model of trust in which mistrust or rejection of Websites is based on design factors and trust or selection of Websites is based on content factors such as source credibility and personalization. Based on this model, a set of guidelines for developing trust in health Websites is proposed and key differences between face-to-face communication and web-based systems are discussed.

© All rights reserved Sillence et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Sillence, Elizabeth, Briggs, Pamela, Harris, Peter and Fishwick, Lesley (2007): Going online for health advice: Changes in usage and trust practices over the last five years. In Interacting with Computers, 19 (3) pp. 397-406.

Abstract In recent years the number of health related websites has increased dramatically and so have concerns regarding the quality of online information. The sheer volume of sites and the variety of information available have left health consumers potentially with greater choice but it is not clear whether these online changes are reflected in user behaviour. This study addresses whether users are becoming more proficient in searching for credible, high quality information and whether they are more demanding of the type of information being sought and less ready to trust online health advice. This paper describes changes in the use of the Internet for health advice over a five-year period. It compares findings from two large-scale online questionnaire studies undertaken in 2000 and 2005. Key changes and similarities in usage and trust practices are noted. The rise in unregulated sites is discussed in terms of patients "acting as scientists" using websites to test out theories regarding their health. The increasing importance of design issues is also highlighted and implications for website designers and content providers are presented.

© All rights reserved Sillence et al. and/or Elsevier Science

2006
 
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Sillence, Elizabeth, Briggs, Pamela, Harris, Peter and Fishwick, Lesley (2006): A framework for understanding trust factors in web-based health advice. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 64 (8) pp. 697-713.

Trust is a key factor in consumer decisions about website engagement. Consumers will engage with sites they deem trustworthy and turn away from those they mistrust. In this paper, we present a framework for understanding trust factors in web-based health advice. The framework is derived from a staged model of trust and allows predictions to be made concerning user engagement with different health websites. The framework is then validated via a series of qualitative, longitudinal studies. In each study, genuine consumers searched online for information and advice concerning their specific health issue. They engaged in free searching and were directed towards sites previously reviewed using the framework. Thematic analysis of the group discussions provided support for the framework and for the staged model of trust wherein design appeal predicted rejection (mistrust) and credibility of information and personalization of content predicted selection (trust) of advice sites. The results are discussed in terms of the merits of the framework, its limitations and directions for future work.

© All rights reserved Sillence et al. and/or Academic Press

2005
 
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Kostakos, Vassilis, O'Neill, Eamonn, Little, Linda and Sillence, Elizabeth (2005): The social implications of emerging technologies. In Interacting with Computers, 17 (5) pp. 475-483.

2004
 
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Sillence, Elizabeth, Briggs, Pamela, Fishwick, Lesley and Harris, Peter (2004): Trust and mistrust of online health sites. In: Dykstra-Erickson, Elizabeth and Tscheligi, Manfred (eds.) Proceedings of ACM CHI 2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 663-670.

Do different design and information content factors influence trust and mistrust of online health sites? Fifteen women faced with a risky health decision were observed while searching the Internet for information and advice over four consecutive weeks. In some sessions their searches were unstructured, whilst in other sessions they were directed to review specific sites, chosen for their trust design elements. Content analysis of concurrent verbalisations and group discussion protocols provided support for a staged model wherein design appeal predicted rejection (mistrust) and credibility of information and personalisation of content predicted selection (trust) of advice sites.

© All rights reserved Sillence et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Changes to this page (author)

16 Jan 2011: Modified
18 Nov 2010: Modified
08 Sep 2009: Modified
12 Jul 2009: Modified
12 May 2008: Modified
12 May 2008: Modified
27 Jun 2007: Modified
27 Jun 2007: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/elizabeth_sillence.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2004-2009
Pub. count:9
Number of co-authors:10



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Pamela Briggs:4
Linda Little:4
Peter Harris:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Elizabeth Sillence's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Abigail Sellen:81
Eamonn O'Neill:31
Vassilis Kostakos:20
 
 
 
Jul 13

A general principle for all user interface design is to go through all of your design elements and remove them one at a time. If the design works as well without a certain design element, kill it.

-- Jakob Nielsen, Designing Web Usability, p. 22.

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!