Publication statistics

Pub. period:2005-2014
Pub. count:12
Number of co-authors:9



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Tony Morelli:
John Foley:
Lauren Lieberman:

 

 

Productive colleagues

Eelke Folmer's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Jan Bosch:5
Bei Yuan:4
Bugra Oktay:3
 
 
 

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Eelke Folmer

Picture of Eelke Folmer.
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Personal Homepage:
http://www.eelke.com

Current place of employment:
Reno, Nevada

Eelke Folmer is an assistant Professor at the University of Nevada in Reno. Previously he worked as a postdoctoral fellow in the Software Engineering / Games Group at the University of Alberta. He received a PhD degree from the University of Groningen where he worked on the European Union funded Software Architecture for Usability (STATUS) project.   His research interests revolve around the relationship between software architecture and software quality, motivated by the fact that the quality of a system is very much restricted and determined by architecture design. His interests are primarily geared towards the games domain where he currently works on: - component based game development - game quality e.g. usability& accessibility

 

Publications by Eelke Folmer (bibliography)

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2014

Interaction Design Patterns (2014)

2012
 
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Folmer, Eelke and Morelli, Tony (2012): Spatial gestures using a tactile-proprioceptive display. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2012. pp. 139-142. Available online

Proprioception -- the human ability to sense the orientation of limbs without vision or hearing -- is one of the main drivers of motor operations and plays a significant role in input modalities such as touch and gestures. As an output modality proprioception has remained largely unexplored -- though it can convey information to a user using their own body. Spatial interaction requires users to visually acquire the location of an object, which can then be manipulated using a touch or gesture. This is challenging if you are unable to see or in mobile contexts where the use of a display may be undesirable. This paper evaluates a tactile-proprioceptive display for eye and ear free 2D target acquisition and spatial interaction.

© All rights reserved Folmer and Morelli and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Oktay, Bugra and Folmer, Eelke (2011): Syntherella: a feedback synthesizer for efficient exploration of virtual worlds using a screen reader. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Conference on Graphics Interface 2011. pp. 65-70.

Thanks to the recent efforts, virtual worlds are, at the very least, partially accessible to users with visual impairments. However, generating effective non-visual descriptions for these environments is still a challenge. Sighted users can process an entire scene with many objects in an instant but screen reader users may easily get overwhelmed by this great amount of information when it is transformed into linear speech feedback. Additionally, user studies from our previous work show that iteratively querying the environment for detailed descriptions slows down the interaction significantly. Syntherella is a feedback synthesizer that aims to provide meaningful, effective yet concise textual representations of the virtual worlds while minimizing the required number of queries for accessing information.

© All rights reserved Oktay and Folmer and/or their publisher

 
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Morelli, Tony, Foley, John, Lieberman, Lauren and Folmer, Eelke (2011): Pet-N-Punch: upper body tactile/audio exergame to engage children with visual impairments into physical activity. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Conference on Graphics Interface 2011. pp. 223-230.

Individuals with visual impairments have significantly higher levels of obesity and often exhibit delays in motor development, caused by a general lack of opportunities to be physically active. Tactile/audio based exergames that only involve motions of the dominant arm have been successfully explored to engage individuals with visual impairments into physical activity. This paper presents an accessible exergame called Pet-N-Punch that can be played using one or two arms. A user study with 12 children who were blind showed that they were able to achieve light to moderate physical activity, but no significant difference in energy expenditure was detected between both versions. The two arm version had a significantly higher error rate than the one arm version, which shows that the two arm version has a significantly higher cognitive load. Players were found to be able to respond to tactile/audio cues within 2500ms.

© All rights reserved Morelli et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Oktay, Bugra and Folmer, Eelke (2010): Synthesizing meaningful feedback for exploring virtual worlds using a screen reader. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4165-4170. Available online

Users who are visually impaired can access virtual worlds, such as Second Life, with a screen reader by extracting a meaningful textual representation of the environment their avatar is in. Since virtual worlds are densely populated with large amounts of user-generated content, users must iteratively query their environment as to not to be overwhelmed with audio feedback. On the other hand, iteratively interacting with virtual worlds is inherently slower. This paper describes our current work on developing a mechanism that can synthesize a more usable and efficient form of feedback using a taxonomy of virtual world objects.

© All rights reserved Oktay and Folmer and/or their publisher

 
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Oktay, Bugra and Folmer, Eelke (2010): TextSL: a screen reader accessible interface for second life. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Cross-Disciplinary Conference on Web Accessibility W4A 2010. p. 21. Available online

TextSL is a screen reader accessible interface for the popular virtual world of Second Life that lets the users interact using a command-based interface. Our research identified that it is challenging to make virtual worlds accessible to users with visual impairments as virtual worlds are densely populated with objects while at the same time many virtual world objects lack meta-data.

© All rights reserved Oktay and Folmer and/or their publisher

 
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Morelli, Tony, Foley, John and Folmer, Eelke (2010): Vi-bowling: a tactile spatial exergame for individuals with visual impairments. In: Twelfth Annual ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Assistive Technologies 2010. pp. 179-186. Available online

Lack of sight forms a significant barrier to participate in physical activity. Consequently, individuals with visual impairments are at greater risk for developing serious health problems, such as obesity. Exergames are video games that provide physical exercise. For individuals with visual impairments, exergames have the potential to reduce health disparities as they may be safer to play and can be played without the help of others. This paper presents VI Bowling, a tactile/audio exergame that can be played using an inexpensive motion-sensing controller. VI Bowling explores tactile dowsing: a novel technique for performing spatial sensorimotor challenges, which can be used for motor learning. VI Bowling was evaluated with six blind adults. All players enjoyed VI Bowling and the challenge tactile dowsing provided. Players could throw their ball with an average error of 9.76 degrees using tactile dowsing. Participants achieved an average active energy expenditure of 4.61 kJ/Min while playing VI Bowling, which is comparable to walking.

© All rights reserved Morelli et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Yuan, Bei, Sapre, Manjari and Folmer, Eelke (2010): Seek-n-Tag: a game for labeling and classifying virtual world objects. In: Proceedings of the 2010 Conference on Graphics Interface 2010. pp. 201-208. Available online

We identified that virtual worlds that rely on user generated content often lack accurate metadata for their objects. The apparent lack of metadata is a problem for users who are visually impaired, as they rely upon textual descriptions of objects to be present for accessing virtual worlds using assistive technology, such as a screen reader or tactile display. This paper presents a scavenger-hunt game for the virtual world of Second Life -- called SEEK-N-TAG -- that allows sighted users to label objects as well as collaboratively develop a taxonomy for objects. SEEK-N-TAG aims to build a set of objects with accurate metadata that can be used as training data for an automatic object classifier. Our approach is novel due to its internal approach where the game is implemented in the virtual world itself as to improve its own accessibility. A user study with 10 participants revealed that labeling objects with a game is more effective and accurate than manually naming objects.

© All rights reserved Yuan et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Folmer, Eelke, Yuan, Bei, Carr, Dave and Sapre, Manjari (2009): TextSL: A Command-Based Virtual World Interface for the Visually Impaired. In: 11th international ACM SIGACCESS conference on Computers and accessibility October 2009, 2009, Pittsburgh, PA. pp. 59-66.

The immersive graphics, large amount of user-generated content, and social interaction opportunities offered by popular virtual worlds, such as Second Life, could eventually make for a more interactive and informative World Wide Web. Unfortunately, virtual worlds are currently not accessible to users who are visually impaired. This paper presents the work on developing TextSL, a client for Second life that can be accessed with a screen reader. Users interact with TextSL using a command-based interface, which allows for performing a plethora of different actions on large numbers of objects and avatars; characterizing features of such virtual worlds. User studies confirm that a command-based interface is a feasible approach towards making virtual worlds accessible, as it allows screen reader users to explore Second Life, communicate with other avatars, and interact with objects as well as sighted users. Command-based exploration and object interaction is significantly slower, but communication can be performed with the same efficiency as in the Second Life viewer. We further identify that at least 31% of the objects in Second Life lack a descriptive name, which is a significant barrier towards making virtual worlds accessible to users who are visually impaired.

© All rights reserved Folmer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Folmer, Eelke, Yuan, Bei, Carr, Dave and Sapre, Manjari (2009): TextSL: a command-based virtual world interface for the visually impaired. In: Eleventh Annual ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Assistive Technologies 2009. pp. 59-66. Available online

The immersive graphics, large amount of user-generated content, and social interaction opportunities offered by popular virtual worlds, such as Second Life, could eventually make for a more interactive and informative World Wide Web. Unfortunately, virtual worlds are currently not accessible to users who are visually impaired. This paper presents the work on developing TextSL, a client for Second life that can be accessed with a screen reader. Users interact with TextSL using a command-based interface, which allows for performing a plethora of different actions on large numbers of objects and avatars; characterizing features of such virtual worlds. User studies confirm that a command-based interface is a feasible approach towards making virtual worlds accessible, as it allows screen reader users to explore Second Life, communicate with other avatars, and interact with objects as well as sighted users. Command-based exploration and object interaction is significantly slower, but communication can be performed with the same efficiency as in the Second Life viewer. We further identify that at least 31% of the objects in Second Life lack a descriptive name, which is a significant barrier towards making virtual worlds accessible to users who are visually impaired.

© All rights reserved Folmer et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Yuan, Bei and Folmer, Eelke (2008): Blind hero: enabling guitar hero for the visually impaired. In: Tenth Annual ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Assistive Technologies 2008. pp. 169-176. Available online

Very few video games have been designed or adapted to allow people with vision impairment to play. Music/rhythm games however are particularly suitable for such people as they are perfectly capable of perceiving audio signals. Guitar Hero is a popular rhythm game yet it is not accessible to the visually impaired as it relies on visual stimuli. This paper explores replacing visual stimuli with haptic stimuli as a viable strategy to make games accessible. We developed a glove that transforms visual information into haptic feedback using small pager motors attached to the tip of each finger. This allows a blind player to play Guitar Hero. Several tests have been conducted and despite minor changes to the gameplay, visually impaired players are able to play the game successfully and enjoy the challenge the game provides. The results of the study also give valuable insights on how to make mainstream games blind-accessible.

© All rights reserved Yuan and Folmer and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Folmer, Eelke, Gurp, Jilles van and Bosch, Jan (2005): Software Architecture Analysis of Usability. In: Bastide, Remi, Palanque, Philippe A. and Roth, Jorg (eds.) Engineering Human Computer Interaction and Interactive Systems, Joint Working Conferences EHCI-DSVIS 2004 July 11-13, 2005, Hamburg, Germany. pp. 38-58. Available online

 
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