Publication statistics

Pub. period:2000-2012
Pub. count:26
Number of co-authors:26



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Jaime Ruiz:13
Michael Terry:5
Andrea Bunt:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Edward Lank's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Yang Li:30
Michael Terry:21
Celine Latulipe:20
 
 
 

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Edward Lank

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Publications by Edward Lank (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Negulescu, Matei, Ruiz, Jaime, Li, Yang and Lank, Edward (2012): Tap, swipe, or move: attentional demands for distracted smartphone input. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces 2012. pp. 173-180.

Smartphones are frequently used in environments where the user is distracted by another task, for example by walking or by driving. While the typical interface for smartphones involves hardware and software buttons and surface gestures, researchers have recently posited that, for distracted environments, benefits may exist in using motion gestures to execute commands. In this paper, we examine the relative cognitive demands of motion gestures and surface taps and gestures in two specific distracted scenarios: a walking scenario, and an eyes-free seated scenario. We show, first, that there is no significant difference in reaction time for motion gestures, taps, or surface gestures on smartphones. We further show that motion gestures result in significantly less time looking at the smartphone during walking than does tapping on the screen, even with interfaces optimized for eyes-free input. Taken together, these results show that, despite somewhat lower throughput, there may be benefits to making use of motion gestures as a modality for distracted input on smartphones.

© All rights reserved Negulescu et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Azad, Alec, Ruiz, Jaime, Vogel, Daniel, Hancock, Mark and Lank, Edward (2012): Territoriality and behaviour on and around large vertical publicly-shared displays. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 468-477.

We investigate behaviours on, and around, large vertical displays during concurrent usage. Using an observational field study, we identify fundamental patterns of how people use existing public displays: their orientation, positioning, group identification, and behaviour within and between social groups just-before, during, and just-after usage. These results are then used to motivate a controlled experiment where two individuals or two pairs of individuals complete tasks concurrently on a simulated large vertical display. Results from our controlled study demonstrates that vertical surface territories are similar to those found in horizontal tabletops in function, but their definitions and social conventions are different. In addition, the nature of use-while-standing systems results in more complex and dynamic physical territories around the display. We show that the anthropological notion of personal space must be slightly refined for application to vertical displays.

© All rights reserved Azad et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Negulescu, Matei, Ruiz, Jaime and Lank, Edward (2012): A recognition safety net: bi-level threshold recognition for mobile motion gestures. In: Proceedings of the 14th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2012. pp. 147-150.

Designers of motion gestures for mobile devices face the difficult challenge of building a recognizer that can separate gestural input from motion noise. A threshold value is often used to classify motion and effectively balances the rates of false positives and false negatives. We present a bi-level threshold recognition technique designed to lower the rate of recognition failures by accepting either a tightly thresholded gesture or two consecutive possible gestures recognized by a relaxed model. Evaluation of the technique demonstrates that the technique can aid in recognition for users who have trouble performing motion gestures. Lastly, we suggest the use of bi-level thresholding to scaffold the learning of gestures.

© All rights reserved Negulescu et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Pietroszek, Krzysztof and Lank, Edward (2012): Clicking blindly: using spatial correspondence to select targets in multi-device environments. In: Proceedings of the 14th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2012. pp. 331-334.

We propose spatial correspondence targeting to support interaction between devices in multi-device environments when network connectivity fails. In spatial correspondence targeting, for a given target on surface A, an end-user envisions the relative position of that target on surface B and interacts on surface B without any visual depiction of the target on surface B. The targeting task relies on human spatial visualization ability, i.e. the ability to relate the spatial position of objects on one display to their scale-invariant position on another display. We provide experimental evidence that demonstrates that users may be able to target up to 25 discrete targets using a smartphone screen even in the absence of a depiction of the target on the smartphone screen. We argue that the accuracy of spatial correspondence targeting is sufficient for the technique to have many practical applications.

© All rights reserved Pietroszek and Lank and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Ruiz, Jaime, Li, Yang and Lank, Edward (2011): User-defined motion gestures for mobile interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 197-206.

Modern smartphones contain sophisticated sensors to monitor three-dimensional movement of the device. These sensors permit devices to recognize motion gestures -- deliberate movements of the device by end-users to invoke commands. However, little is known about best-practices in motion gesture design for the mobile computing paradigm. To address this issue, we present the results of a guessability study that elicits end-user motion gestures to invoke commands on a smartphone device. We demonstrate that consensus exists among our participants on parameters of movement and on mappings of motion gestures onto commands. We use this consensus to develop a taxonomy for motion gestures and to specify an end-user inspired motion gesture set. We highlight the implications of this work to the design of smartphone applications and hardware. Finally, we argue that our results influence best practices in design for all gestural interfaces.

© All rights reserved Ruiz et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Negulescu, Matei, Ruiz, Jaime and Lank, Edward (2011): ZoomPointing revisited: supporting mixed-resolution gesturing on interactive surfaces. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2011. pp. 150-153.

In this work, we explore the design of multi-resolution input on multi-touch devices. We devised a refined zooming technique named Offset, where the target is set at a location offset from the non-dominant hand while the dominant hand controls the direction and magnitude of the expansion. Additionally, we explored the use of non-persistent transformations of the view in our design. A think-aloud study that compared our design to a bimanual widget interaction and the classic pinch-based interaction with a freeform drawing task suggests that Offset offers benefits in terms of performance and degree of control. As well, for the drawing tasks, the transient nature of view transformations appears to impact not only performance, but workflow, focus of interaction, and subjective quality of results by providing a constant overview of the user's task.

© All rights reserved Negulescu et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Lank, Edward, Stedman, Ryan and Terry, Michael (2010): Estimating residual error rate in recognized handwritten documents using artificial error injection. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1-4.

Both handwriting recognition systems and their users are error prone. Handwriting recognizers make recognition errors, and users may miss those errors when verifying output. As a result, it is common for recognized documents to contain residual errors. Unfortunately, in some application domains (e.g. health informatics), tolerance for residual errors in recognized handwriting may be very low, and a desire might exist to maximize user accuracy during verification. In this paper, we present a technique that allows us to measure the performance of a user verifying recognizer output. We inject artificial errors into a set of recognized handwritten forms and show that the rate of injected errors and recognition errors caught is highly correlated in real time. Systems supporting user verification can make use of this measure of user accuracy in a variety of ways. For example, they can force users to slow down or can highlight injected errors that were missed, thus encouraging users to take more care.

© All rights reserved Lank et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hammond, Tracy, Lank, Edward and Adler, Aaron (2010): SkCHI: designing sketch recognition interfaces. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4501-4504.

Sketch recognition user interfaces currently treat the pen in the same manner as a mouse and keyboard. The aim of this workshop is to promote thought and discussion about how to move beyond this to create natural and intuitive pen-based interfaces. To this end, the workshop will include panel discussions, group discussions, and even an instructional session on drawing sketches.

© All rights reserved Hammond et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Ruiz, Jaime and Lank, Edward (2010): Speeding pointing in tiled widgets: understanding the effects of target expansion and misprediction. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2010. pp. 229-238.

Target expansion is a pointing facilitation technique where the user's target, typically an interface widget, is dynamically enlarged to speed pointing in interfaces. However, with densely packed (tiled) arrangements of widgets, interfaces cannot expand all potential targets; they must, instead, predict the user's desired target. As a result, mispredictions will occur which may disrupt the pointing task. In this paper, we present a model describing the cost/benefit of expanding multiple targets using the probability distribution of a given predictor. Using our model, we demonstrate how the model can be used to infer the accuracy required by target prediction techniques. The results of this work are another step toward pointing facilitation techniques that allow users to outperform Fitts' Law in realistic pointing tasks.

© All rights reserved Ruiz and Lank and/or their publisher

 
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Ataullah, Ahmed A. and Lank, Edward (2010): Googling Bing: reassessing the impact of brand on the perceived quality of two contemporary search engines. In: Proceedings of the HCI10 Conference on People and Computers XXIV 2010. pp. 337-345.

Given the high value of the online search market, whether brand perception or quality of search results matters more for users is a highly salient question. This paper presents findings of the largest controlled, systematic preference elicitation study of search quality versus brand perception. We examine a total of 548 instances of sponsored and organic search results from the Google and Bing search engines as rated by 25 participants. We find that, if users are not aware of the source of a set of search results, they will consistently rate Google results as better. However, the presence of the Google brand strongly influences perceived quality, essentially over-riding differences in search result quality. Together, these results demonstrate that, while Google may outperform Bing in blind searching, trust in the Google brand is a much more significant factor in users' search preferences.

© All rights reserved Ataullah and Lank and/or BCS

2009
 
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Bunt, Andrea, Terry, Michael and Lank, Edward (2009): Friend or foe?: examining CAS use in mathematics research. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 229-238.

Computer Algebra Systems (CAS) provide sophisticated functionality to assist with mathematical problem solving. Despite their widespread adoption, however, little work in the HCI community has examined the extent to which these computational tools support domain experts. In this paper, we report findings from a qualitative study investigating the work practices and tools of nine mathematicians in a research setting. Counter to our expectations, our data suggests that computational tools play only a minor role in their workflow, with the limited use of CAS owing primarily to four factors: (1) the need for transparency in CAS's reasoning to explain computed results; (2) the problem of rigidity and formality in CAS's input/output style dialogue; (3) the need for 2D input to support a wide range of annotations, diagrams, and in-place manipulation of objects of interest; and (4) the need for collaboration, particularly in early stages of problem solving. While grounded in the study of mathematicians, these findings (particularly the first) have implications for the design of computational systems intended to support complex problem solving.

© All rights reserved Bunt et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Szentgyorgyi, Christine, Terry, Michael and Lank, Edward (2008): Renegade gaming: practices surrounding social use of the Nintendo DS handheld gaming system. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1463-1472.

Today's handheld gaming systems allow players to engage in multiplayer games via ad-hoc, wireless networking. They are also now sufficiently commonplace that it is possible to study how portability and ad-hoc wireless networking have affected the social gaming practices of owners of these systems. In this paper, we report findings from a qualitative study investigating the collocated multiplayer gaming practices of Nintendo DS owners. Based on interviews of nine DS owners and observations of three organized gaming events, we identified three major themes surrounding the social, multiplayer gaming practices of Nintendo DS users: renegade gaming, or the notion that users reappropriate contexts traditionally hostile to game play; pragmatic and social barriers to the formation of ad-hoc pick-up games, despite a clear desire for multiplayer, collocated gaming; and private gaming spheres, or the observation that the handheld device's form factor creates individual, privatized gaming contexts within larger social contexts. These findings lead to a set of implications for the design of future handheld gaming systems.

© All rights reserved Szentgyorgyi et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ruiz, Jaime, Bunt, Andrea and Lank, Edward (2008): A Model of Non-Preferred Hand Mode Switching. In: Proceedings of the 2008 Conference on Graphics Interface May 28-30, 2008, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. pp. 49-56.

Effective mode-switching techniques provide users of tablet interfaces with access to a rich set of behaviors. While many researchers have studied the relative performance of mode-switching techniques in these interfaces, these metrics tell us little about the behavior of one technique in the absence of a competitor. Differing from past comparison-based research, this paper describes a temporal model of the behavior of a common mode switching technique, non-preferred hand mode switching. Using the Hick-Hyman Law, we claim that the asymptotic cost of adding additional nonpreferred hand modes to an interface is a logarithmic function of the number of modes. We validate the model experimentally, and show a strong correlation between experimental data and values predicted by the model. Implications of this research for the design of mode-based interfaces are highlighted.

© All rights reserved Ruiz et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Ruiz, Jaime, Tausky, David, Bunt, Andrea, Lank, Edward and Mann, Richard (2008): Analyzing the Kinematics of Bivariate Pointing. In: Proceedings of the 2008 Conference on Graphics Interface May 28-30, 2008, Windsor, Ontario, Canada. pp. 251-258.

Despite the importance of pointing-device movement to efficiency in interfaces, little is known on how target shape impacts speed, acceleration, and other kinematic properties of motion. In this paper, we examine which kinematic characteristics of motion are impacted by amplitude and directional target constraints in Fitts-style pointing tasks. Our results show that instantaneous speed, acceleration, and jerk are most affected by target constraint. Results also show that the effects of target constraint are concentrated in the first 70% of movement distance. We demonstrate that we can discriminate between the two classes of target constraint using Machine Learning with accuracy greater than chance. Finally, we highlight future work in designing techniques that make use of target constraint to improve pointing efficiency in computer interfaces.

© All rights reserved Ruiz et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Fung, Richard, Lank, Edward, Terry, Michael and Latulipe, Celine (2008): Kinematic templates: end-user tools for content-relative cursor manipulations. In: Cousins, Steve B. and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (eds.) Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 19-22, 2008, Monterey, CA, USA. pp. 47-56.

 
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Park, Taehyun, Lank, Edward, Poupart, Pascal and Terry, Michael (2008): Is the sky pure today? AwkChecker: an assistive tool for detecting and correcting collocation errors. In: Cousins, Steve B. and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (eds.) Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 19-22, 2008, Monterey, CA, USA. pp. 121-130.

2007
 
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Lank, Edward, Cheng, Yi-Chun Nikko and Ruiz, Jaime (2007): Endpoint prediction using motion kinematics. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 637-646.

Recently proposed novel interaction techniques such as cursor jumping [1] and target expansion for tiled arrangements [13] are predicated on an ability to effectively estimate the endpoint of an input gesture prior to its completion. However, current endpoint estimation techniques lack the precision to make these interaction techniques possible. To address a recognized lack of effective endpoint prediction mechanisms, we propose a new technique for endpoint prediction that applies established laws of motion kinematics in a novel way to the identification of motion endpoint. The technique derives a model of speed over distance that permits extrapolation. We verify our model experimentally using stylus targeting tasks, and demonstrate that our endpoint prediction is almost twice as accurate as the previously tested technique [13] at points more than twice as distant from motion endpoint.

© All rights reserved Lank et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Szentgyorgyi, Christine and Lank, Edward (2007): Five-key text input using rhythmic mappings. In: Massaro, Dominic W., Takeda, Kazuya, Roy, Deb and Potamianos, Alexandros (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2007 November 12-15, 2007, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan. pp. 118-121.

 
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Ruiz, Jaime and Lank, Edward (2007): A study on the scalability of non-preferred hand mode manipulation. In: Massaro, Dominic W., Takeda, Kazuya, Roy, Deb and Potamianos, Alexandros (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces - ICMI 2007 November 12-15, 2007, Nagoya, Aichi, Japan. pp. 170-177.

 
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Szentgyorgyi, Christine and Lank, Edward (2007): Five-key text input using rhythmic mappings. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2007. pp. 118-121.

Novel key mappings, including chording, character prediction, and multi-tap, allow the use of fewer keys than those on a conventional keyboard to enter text. In this paper, we explore a text input method that makes use of rhythmic mappings of five keys. The keying technique averages 1.5 keystrokes per character for typical English text. In initial testing, the technique shows performance similar to chording and other multi-tap techniques, and our subjects had few problems with basic text entry. Five-key entry techniques may have benefits for text entry in multi-point touch devices, as they eliminate targeting by providing a unique mapping for each finger.

© All rights reserved Szentgyorgyi and Lank and/or their publisher

 
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Ruiz, Jaime and Lank, Edward (2007): A study on the scalability of non-preferred hand mode manipulation. In: Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2007. pp. 170-177.

In pen-tablet input devices modes allow overloading of the electronic stylus. In the case of two modes, switching modes with the non-preferred hand is most effective [12]. Further, allowing temporal overlap of mode switch and pen action boosts speed [11]. We examine the effect of increasing the number of interface modes accessible via non-preferred hand mode switching on task performance in pen-tablet interfaces. We demonstrate that the temporal benefit of overlapping mode-selection and pen action for the two mode case is preserved as the number of modes increases. This benefit is the result of both concurrent action of the hands, and reduced planning time for the overall task. Finally, while allowing bimanual overlap is still faster it takes longer to switch modes as the number of modes increases. Improved understanding of the temporal costs presented assists in the design of pen-tablet interfaces with larger sets of interface modes.

© All rights reserved Ruiz and Lank and/or their publisher

2006
 
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Lank, Edward, Ruiz, Jaime and Cowan, William B. (2006): Concurrent bimanual stylus interaction: a study of non-preferred hand mode manipulation. In: Proceedings of the 2006 Conference on Graphics Interface 2006. pp. 17-24.

Pen/Stylus input systems are constrained by the limited input capacity of the electronic stylus. Stylus modes, which allow multiple interpretations of the same input, lift capacity limits, but confront the user with possible cognitive and motor costs associated with switching modes. This paper examines the costs of bimanual mode switching, in which the non-preferred hand performs actions that change modes while the preferred hand executes gestures that provide input. We examine three variants to control mode of a stylus gesture: pre-gesture mediation, post-gesture mediation, and mediation that occurs concurrently with stylus gesturing. The results show that concurrent mode-switching is faster than the alternatives, and, in one trial, marginally outperforms the control condition, un-moded drawing. These results demonstrate an instance in which suitably designed mode-switching offers minimal cost to the user. The implications of this result for the design of stylus input systems are highlighted.

© All rights reserved Lank et al. and/or Canadian Information Processing Society

2005
 
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Roberts, John, Ruiz, Jaime and Lank, Edward (2005): Making Favorites Useful. In: Hamza, M.H. (ed.) Proceedings of he IASTED International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction November 14-16, 2005, Phoenix, USA. pp. 96-101.

In this paper, we describe our work in adding functionality to the standard favorites, or bookmarks, list typically available in modern web browsers. Our goal is to increase the rate at which those browsing the web can re-find information they have previously bookmarked for later perusal. To this end, we have developed a favorites manager, deployed in a simple web browsing application, that introduces favorites management features beyond those found in typical web browsers, including additional metadata, automated organization, and search tools. We present the details of this application, along with the results of a user trial measuring the usability of the favorites management system we developed

© All rights reserved Roberts et al. and/or Acta Press

 
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Lank, Edward and Saund, Eric (2005): Sloppy selection: Providing an accurate interpretation of imprecise selection gestures. In Computers & Graphics, 29 (4) pp. 490-500.

2003
 
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Saund, Eric and Lank, Edward (2003): Stylus input and editing without prior selection of mode. In: Proceedings of the 16th annural ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology November, 2-5, 2003, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 213-216.

This paper offers a solution to the mode problem in computer sketch/notetaking programs. Conventionally, the user must specify the intended "draw" or "command" mode prior to performing a stroke. This necessity has proven to be a barrier to the usability of pen/stylus systems. We offer a novel Inferred-Mode interaction protocol that avoids the mode hassles of conventional sketch systems. The system infers the user's intent, if possible, from the properties of the pen trajectory and the context of the trajectory. If the intent is ambiguous, the user is offered a choice mediator in the form of a pop-up button. To maximize the fluidity of drawing, the user is entitled to ignore the mediator and continue drawing. We present decision logic for the inferred mode protocol, and discuss subtleties learned in the course of its development. We also present results of initial user trials validating the usability of this interaction design.

© All rights reserved Saund and Lank and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Blostein, Dorothea, Lank, Edward and Zanibbi, Richard (2000): Treatment of Diagrams in Document Image Analysis. In: Anderson, Michael, Cheng, Peter C-H. and Haarslev, Volker (eds.) Diagrams 2000 - Theory and Application of Diagrams - First International Conference September 1-3, 2000, Edinburgh, Scotland, UK. pp. 330-344.

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/edward_lank.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2000-2012
Pub. count:26
Number of co-authors:26



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Jaime Ruiz:13
Michael Terry:5
Andrea Bunt:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Edward Lank's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Yang Li:30
Michael Terry:21
Celine Latulipe:20
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

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Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
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by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
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by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading