Publication statistics

Pub. period:1994-2012
Pub. count:35
Number of co-authors:61



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Susan Dumais:7
Ken Hinckley:6
Patrick Baudisch:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Edward Cutrell's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ravin Balakrishnan:108
Mary Czerwinski:80
Susan Dumais:74
 
 
 
Jul 29

There is an old English folk saying that goes, "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen." I have a different approach: Do something about the heat. The folk saying would have us accept the poor designs of the world. Why? After all, if people were responsible for the "heat" in the first place, then people should be able to do something about it. Is the kitchen too hot? Redesign it.

-- Don Norman

 
 

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Edward Cutrell

Has also published under the name of:
"Ed Cutrell" and "E. Cutrell"

Personal Homepage:
research.microsoft.com/en-us/um/people/cutrell/


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Publications by Edward Cutrell (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Cross, Andrew, Cutrell, Edward and Thies, William (2012): Low-cost audience polling using computer vision. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 45-54.

Electronic response systems known as "clickers" have demonstrated educational benefits in well-resourced classrooms, but remain out-of-reach for most schools due to their prohibitive cost. We propose a new, low-cost technique that utilizes computer vision for real-time polling of a classroom. Our approach allows teachers to ask a multiple-choice question. Students respond by holding up a qCard: a sheet of paper that contains a printed code, similar to a QR code, encoding their student IDs. Students indicate their answers (A, B, C or D) by holding the card in one of four orientations. Using a laptop and an off-the-shelf webcam, our software automatically recognizes and aggregates the students' responses and displays them to the teacher. We built this system and performed initial trials in secondary schools in Bangalore, India. In a 25-student classroom, our system offers 99.8% recognition accuracy, captures 97% of responses within 10 seconds, and costs 15 times less than existing electronic solutions.

© All rights reserved Cross et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Cutrell, Edward (2011): Technology for emerging markets at MSR India. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW11 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2011. pp. 9-16.

The Technology for Emerging Markets (TEM) group at Microsoft Research India seeks to address the needs and aspirations of people in the world's developing communities. Our research targets people who are just beginning to use computing technologies and services as well as those for whom access to computing still remains largely out of reach. Most of our work falls under the rubric of the relatively young field of Information and Communication Technology for Development (ICTD or ICT4D). Reflecting the interdisciplinary nature of ICTD, TEM is a multidisciplinary group engaged in a range of technical and social-science research. We work in the areas of cultural anthropology, sociology, political science, economics, and psychology, all of which help us understand the social context of technology and how it relates to communities and individual users. We combine this understanding with technical research in hardware and software to devise solutions for underserved communities in rural and urban environments around the world.

© All rights reserved Cutrell and/or his/her publisher

 
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Sambasivan, Nithya, Weber, Julie and Cutrell, Edward (2011): Designing a phone broadcasting system for urban sex workers in India. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 267-276.

In this paper, we present the design, implementation, and deployment of a phone-based broadcasting system designed for reaching out to at-risk populations in urban India. We worked in collaboration with Pragati, a non-governmental organization dedicated to assisting Urban Sex Workers (USWs) in Bangalore, India, with the goal of improving Pragati's outreach to the women they serve. We conducted ethnographic action research to understand and address the needs of Pragati and the lifestyles of USWs. Responding to the unique design constraints of the USW community such as specific privacy and timing constraints, a desire to remain invisible, and the unusually high rate of mobile phone use, we designed a phone-based broadcasting system for Pragati. We then deployed the system on four different occasions and application areas. We present the results and key findings from our study, and conclude with a discussion on how designing for particularly difficult cases such as USWs can shed new light on the design of mobile applications for the developing world in general, such as challenging ubiquity and phone numbers as identity.

© All rights reserved Sambasivan et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Jain, Mohit, Birnholtz, Jeremy, Cutrell, Edward and Balakrishnan, Ravin (2011): Exploring display techniques for mobile collaborative learning in developing regions. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 81-90.

The developing world faces infrastructural challenges in providing Western-style educational computing technologies, but on the other hand observes very high cell phone penetration. However, the use of mobile technology has not been extensively explored in the context of collaborative learning. New projection and display technologies for mobile devices raise the important question of whether to use single or multiple displays in these environments. In this paper, we explore two mobile-based techniques for using co-located collaborative game-play to supplement ESL (English as a Second Language) education in a developing region: (1) Mobile Single Display Groupware: a pico-projector connected to a cell phone, with a handheld controller for each child to interact, and (2) Mobile Multiple Display Groupware: a phone for each child. We explore the types of interaction that occur in both of these conditions and the impact on learning outcomes.

© All rights reserved Jain et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Panjwani, Saurabh, Uppal, Abhinav and Cutrell, Edward (2011): Script-agnostic reflow of text in document images. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 299-302.

Reading text from document images can be difficult on mobile devices due to the limited screen width available on them. While there exist solutions for reflowing Latin-script texts on such devices, these solutions do not work well for images of other scripts or combinations of scripts, since they rely on script-specific characteristics or OCR. We present a technique that reflows text in document images in a manner that is agnostic to the script used to compose them. Our technique achieved over 95% segmentation accuracy for a corpus of 139 images containing text in 4 genetically-distant languages-English, Hindi, Kannada and Arabic. A preliminary user study with a prototype implementation of the technique provided evidence of some of its usability benefits.

© All rights reserved Panjwani et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mathur, Akhil, Ramachandran, Divya, Cutrell, Edward and Balakrishnan, Ravin (2011): An exploratory study on the use of camera phones and pico projectors in rural India. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 347-356.

We explore the potential of using camera phones and pico projectors in rapid creation and presentation of digital content in a development context. A camera phone based content authoring application was designed and deployed with three different user populations in the domains of classroom education and health care. Our findings show that despite the variations in education levels, cultural background, and technology exposure, users successfully created and presented different forms of digital content using the camera phone and pico projector.

© All rights reserved Mathur et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Panjwani, Saurabh and Cutrell, Edward (2010): Usably secure, low-cost authentication for mobile banking. In: Proceedings of the 2010 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2010. p. 4.

This paper explores user authentication schemes for banking systems implemented over mobile phone networks in the developing world. We analyze an authentication scheme currently deployed by an Indian mobile banking service provider which uses a combination of PINs and printed codebooks for authenticating users. As a first step, we report security weaknesses in that scheme and show that it is susceptible to easy and efficient PIN recovery attacks. We then propose a new scheme which offers better secrecy of PINs, while still maintaining the simplicity and scalability advantages of the original scheme. Finally, we investigate the usability of the two schemes with a sample of 34 current and potential customers of the banking system. Our findings suggest that the new scheme is more efficient, less susceptible to human error and better preferred by the target consumers.

© All rights reserved Panjwani and Cutrell and/or their publisher

 
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Ramachandran, Divya, Canny, John, Das, Prabhu Dutta and Cutrell, Edward (2010): Mobile-izing health workers in rural India. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1889-1898.

Researchers have long been interested in the potential of ICTs to enable positive change in developing regions communities. In these environments, ICT interventions often fail because political, social and cultural forces work against the changes ICTs entail. We argue that familiar uses of ICTs for information services in these contexts are less potent than their use for persuasion and motivation in order to facilitate change. We focus on India's rural maternal health system where health workers are employed in villages to persuade pregnant women to utilize health services. Health workers face challenges due to resistance to change in the village, and because of their limited education, training and status. These factors appear to reduce the motivation of health workers and impair their performance. For two months, we deployed short videos on mobile phones designed to persuade village women and motivate health workers. We also asked health workers to record their own videos. While our results are preliminary, they show evidence that the creation and use of videos did help (1) engage village women in dialogue, (2) show positive effects toward health worker motivation and learning, and (3) motivate key community influencers to participate in promoting the health workers.

© All rights reserved Ramachandran et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Buscher, Georg, Dumais, Susan and Cutrell, Edward (2010): The good, the bad, and the random: an eye-tracking study of ad quality in web search. In: Proceedings of the 33rd Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2010. pp. 42-49.

We investigate how people interact with Web search engine result pages using eye-tracking. While previous research has focused on the visual attention devoted to the 10 organic search results, this paper examines other components of contemporary search engines, such as ads and related searches. We systematically varied the type of task (informational or navigational), the quality of the ads (relevant or irrelevant to the query), and the sequence in which ads of different quality were presented. We measured the effects of these variables on the distribution of visual attention and on task performance. Our results show significant effects of each variable. The amount of visual attention that people devote to organic results depends on both task type and ad quality. The amount of visual attention that people devote to ads depends on their quality, but not the type of task. Interestingly, the sequence and predictability of ad quality is also an important factor in determining how much people attend to ads. When the quality of ads varied randomly from task to task, people paid little attention to the ads, even when they were good. These results further our understanding of how attention devoted to search results is influenced by other page elements, and how previous search experiences influence how people attend to the current page.

© All rights reserved Buscher et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Buscher, Georg, Cutrell, Edward and Morris, Meredith Ringel (2009): What do you see when you're surfing?: using eye tracking to predict salient regions of web pages. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 21-30.

An understanding of how people allocate their visual attention when viewing Web pages is very important for Web authors, interface designers, advertisers and others. Such knowledge opens the door to a variety of innovations, ranging from improved Web page design to the creation of compact, yet recognizable, visual representations of long pages. We present an eye-tracking study in which 20 users viewed 361 Web pages while engaged in information foraging and page recognition tasks. From this data, we describe general location-based characteristics of visual attention for Web pages dependent on different tasks and demographics, and generate a model for predicting the visual attention that individual page elements may receive. Finally, we introduce the concept of fixation impact, a new method for mapping gaze data to visual scenes that is motivated by findings in vision research.

© All rights reserved Buscher et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bergman, Ofer, Tucker, Simon, Beyth-Marom, Ruth, Cutrell, Edward and Whittaker, Steve (2009): It's not that important: demoting personal information of low subjective importance using GrayArea. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 269-278.

Users find it hard to delete unimportant personal information which often results in cluttered workspaces. We present a full design cycle for GrayArea, a novel interface that allows users to demote unimportant files by dragging them to a gray area at the bottom of their file folders. Demotion is an intermediate option between keeping and deleting. It combines the advantages of deletion (unimportant files don't compete for attention) and keeping (files are retrieved in their folder context). We developed the GrayArea working prototype using thorough iterative design. We evaluated it by asking 96 participants to 'clean' two folders with, and without, GrayArea. Using GrayArea reduced folder

© All rights reserved Bergman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Teevan, Jaime, Cutrell, Edward, Fisher, Danyel, Drucker, Steven M., Ramos, Gonzalo, André, Paul and Hu, Chang (2009): Visual snippets: summarizing web pages for search and revisitation. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 2023-2032.

People regularly interact with different representations of Web pages. A person looking for new information may initially find a Web page represented as a short snippet rendered by a search engine. When he wants to return to the same page the next day, the page may instead be represented by a link in his browser history. Previous research has explored how to best represent Web pages in support of specific task types, but, as we find in this paper, consistency in representation across tasks is also important. We explore how different representations are used in a variety of contexts and present a compact representation that supports both the identification of new, relevant Web pages and the re-finding of previously viewed pages.

© All rights reserved Teevan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Buscher, Georg, Cutrell, Edward and Morris, Meredith R. (2009): What do you see when you’re surfing Using eye tracking to predict salient regions of web pages. In: Proceedings of the 27th International Conference Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 4-9, 2009, Boston, USA. pp. 21-30.

An understanding of how people allocate their visual attention when viewing Web pages is very important for Web authors, interface designers, advertisers, etc. Such an understanding could open the door to a variety of innovations, ranging from improved Web page design to the creation of compact, yet recognizable, visual representations of long pages. We present an eye-tracking study in which 20 users viewed 361 Web pages while conducting both information foraging and page recognition tasks. We introduce the concept of fixation impact, a new method motivated by findings in vision research for mapping gaze data to Web page elements. Based on the recorded eye-tracking data, we describe general locationbased characteristics of visual attention for Web pages dependent on different tasks and demographics, and generate a model for predicting the visual attention that individual page elements may receive.

© All rights reserved Buscher et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Emotion and website design: [/encyclopedia/emotion_and_website_design.html]


 
2008
 
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Wobbrock, Jacob O., Cutrell, Edward, Harada, Susumu and MacKenzie, I. Scott (2008): An error model for pointing based on Fitts' law. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1613-1622.

For decades, Fitts' law (1954) has been used to model pointing time in user interfaces. As with any rapid motor act, faster pointing movements result in increased errors. But although prior work has examined accuracy as the "spread of hits," no work has formulated a predictive model for error rates (0-100%) based on Fitts' law parameters. We show that Fitts' law mathematically implies a predictive error rate model, which we derive. We then describe an experiment in which target size, target distance, and movement time are manipulated. Our results show a strong model fit: a regression analysis of observed vs. predicted error rates yields a correlation of R{sup:2}=.959 for N=90 points. Furthermore, we show that the effect on error rate of target size (W) is greater than that of target distance (A), indicating a departure from Fitts' law, which maintains that W and A contribute proportionally to index of difficulty (ID). Our error model can be used with Fitts' law to estimate and predict error rates along with speeds, providing a framework for unifying this dichotomy.

© All rights reserved Wobbrock et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Baudisch, Patrick, Zotov, Alexander, Cutrell, Edward and Hinckley, Ken (2008): Starburst: a target expansion algorithm for non-uniform target distributions. In: Levialdi, Stefano (ed.) AVI 2008 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces May 28-30, 2008, Napoli, Italy. pp. 129-137.

2007
 
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Hinckley, Ken, Zhao, Shengdong, Sarin, Raman, Baudisch, Patrick, Cutrell, Edward, Shilman, Michael and Tan, Desney S. (2007): InkSeine: In Situ search for active note taking. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 251-260.

Using a notebook to sketch designs, reflect on a topic, or capture and extend creative ideas are examples of active note taking tasks. Optimal experience for such tasks demands concentration without interruption. Yet active note taking may also require reference documents or emails from team members. InkSeine is a Tablet PC application that supports active note taking by coupling a pen-and-ink interface with an in situ search facility that flows directly from a user's ink notes (Fig. 1). InkSeine integrates four key concepts: it leverages preexisting ink to initiate a search; it provides tight coupling of search queries with application content; it persists search queries as first class objects that can be commingled with ink notes; and it enables a quick and flexible workflow where the user may freely interleave inking, searching, and gathering content. InkSeine offers these capabilities in an interface that is tailored to the unique demands of pen input, and that maintains the primacy of inking above all other tasks.

© All rights reserved Hinckley et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cutrell, Edward and Guan, Zhiwei (2007): What are you looking for?: an eye-tracking study of information usage in web search. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 407-416.

Web search services are among the most heavily used applications on the World Wide Web. Perhaps because search is used in such a huge variety of tasks and contexts, the user interface must strike a careful balance to meet all user needs. We describe a study that used eye tracking methodologies to explore the effects of changes in the presentation of search results. We found that adding information to the contextual snippet significantly improved performance for informational tasks but degraded performance for navigational tasks. We discuss possible reasons for this difference and the design implications for better presentation of search results.

© All rights reserved Cutrell and Guan and/or ACM Press

 
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Guan, Zhiwei and Cutrell, Edward (2007): An eye tracking study of the effect of target rank on web search. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 417-420.

Web search engines present search results in a rank ordered list. This works when what a user wants is near the top, but sometimes the information that the user really wants is located at the bottom of the page. This study examined how users' search behaviors vary when target results were displayed at various positions for informational and navigational tasks. We found that when targets were placed relatively low in the first page of search results, people spent more time searching and were less successful in finding the target, especially for informational tasks. Further analysis of eye movements showed that the decrease in search performance was partially due to the fact that users rarely looked at lower ranking results. The large decrease in performance for informational search is probably because users have high confidence in the search engine's ranking; in contrast to navigational tasks, where the target is more obvious from information presented in the results, in informational tasks, users try out the top ranked results even if these results are perceived as less relevant for the task.

© All rights reserved Guan and Cutrell and/or ACM Press

2006
 
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Hinckley, Ken, Guimbretiere, Francois, Baudisch, Patrick, Sarin, Raman, Agrawala, Maneesh and Cutrell, Edward (2006): The springboard: multiple modes in one spring-loaded control. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 181-190.

Modes allow a few inputs to invoke many operations, yet if a user misclassifies or forgets the state of a system, modes can result in errors. Spring-loaded modes (quasimodes) maintain a mode while the user holds a control such as a button or key. The Springboard is an interaction technique for tablet computers that extends quasimodes to encompass multiple tool modes in a single spring-loaded control. The Springboard allows the user to continue holding down a nonpreferred-hand command button after selecting a tool from a menu as a way to repeatedly apply the same tool. We find the Springboard improves performance for both a local marking menu and for a non-local marking menu ("lagoon") at the lower left corner of the screen. Despite the round-trip costs incurred to move the pen to a tool lagoon, a keystroke-level analysis of the true cost of each technique reveals the local marking menu is not significantly faster.

© All rights reserved Hinckley et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cutrell, Edward, Robbins, Daniel, Dumais, Susan and Sarin, Raman (2006): Fast, flexible filtering with phlat. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 261-270.

Systems for fast search of personal information are rapidly becoming ubiquitous. Such systems promise to dramatically improve personal information management, yet most are modeled on Web search in which users know very little about the content that they are searching. We describe the design and deployment of a system called Phlat that optimizes search for personal information with an intuitive interface that merges search and browsing through a variety of associative and contextual cues. In addition, Phlat supports a unified tagging (labeling) scheme for organizing personal content across storage systems (files, email, etc.). The system has been deployed to hundreds of employees within our organization. We report on both quantitative and qualitative aspects of system use. Phlat is available as a free download at http://research.microsoft.com/adapt/phlat/.

© All rights reserved Cutrell et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cutrell, Edward and Dumais, Susan (2006): Exploring personal information. In Communications of the ACM, 49 (4) pp. 50-51.

 
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Cutrell, Edward, Dumais, Susan and Teevan, Jaime (2006): Searching to eliminate personal information management. In Communications of the ACM, 49 (1) pp. 58-64.

2005
 
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Baudisch, Patrick, Cutrell, Edward, Hinckley, Ken and Eversole, Adam (2005): Snap-and-go: helping users align objects without the modality of traditional snapping. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 301-310.

Snapping is a widely used technique that helps users position graphical objects precisely, e.g., to align them with a grid or other graphical objects. Unfortunately, whenever users want to position a dragged object close to such an aligned location, they first need to deactivate snapping. We propose snap-and-go, a snapping technique that overcomes this limitation. By merely stopping dragged objects at aligned positions, rather than "warping" them there, snap-and-go helps users align objects, yet still allows placing dragged objects anywhere else. While this approach of inserting additional motor space renders snap-and-go slightly slower than traditional snapping, snap-and-go simplifies the user interface by eliminating the need for a deactivation option and thereby allows introducing snapping to application scenarios where traditional snapping is inapplicable. In our user studies, participants were able to align objects up to 138% (1D) and 231% (2D) faster with snap-and-go than without and snap-and-go proved robust against the presence of distracting snap targets.

© All rights reserved Baudisch et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Wilson, A. D. and Cutrell, Edward (2005): FlowMouse: A Computer Vision-Based Pointing and Gesture Input Device. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT05: Human-Computer Interaction 2005. pp. 565-578.

We introduce FlowMouse, a computer vision-based pointing device and gesture input system. FlowMouse uses optical flow techniques to model the motion of the hand and a capacitive touch sensor to enable and disable interaction. By using optical flow rather than a more traditional tracking based method, FlowMouse is exceptionally robust, simple in design, and offers opportunities for fluid gesture-based interaction that go well beyond merely emulating pointing devices such as the mouse. We present a Fitts law study examining pointing performance, and discuss applications of the optical flow field for gesture input.

© All rights reserved Wilson and Cutrell and/or Springer Verlag

2004
 
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Robbins, Daniel C., Cutrell, Edward, Sarin, Raman and Horvitz, Eric (2004): ZoneZoom: map navigation for smartphones with recursive view segmentation. In: Costabile, Maria Francesca (ed.) AVI 2004 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced visual interfaces May 25-28, 2004, Gallipoli, Italy. pp. 231-234.

2003
 
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Dumais, Susan, Cutrell, Edward, Cadiz, Jonathan J., Jancke, Gavin, Sarin, Raman and Robbins, Daniel C. (2003): Stuff I've seen: a system for personal information retrieval and re-use. In: Proceedings of the 26th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 2003. pp. 72-79.

Most information retrieval technologies are designed to facilitate information discovery. However, much knowledge work involves finding and re-using previously seen information. We describe the design and evaluation of a system, called Stuff I've Seen (SIS), that facilitates information re-use. This is accomplished in two ways. First, the system provides a unified index of information that a person has seen, whether it was seen as email, web page, document, appointment, etc. Second, because the information has been seen before, rich contextual cues can be used in the search interface. The system has been used internally by more than 230 employees. We report on both qualitative and quantitative aspects of system use. Initial findings show that time and people are important retrieval cues. Users find information more easily using SIS, and use other search tools less frequently after installation.

© All rights reserved Dumais et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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McLoone, Hugh, Hinckley, Ken and Cutrell, Edward (2003): Bimanual Interaction on the Microsoft Office Keyboard. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 49.

 
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Baudisch, Patrick, Cutrell, Edward, Robbins, Dan, Czerwinski, Mary, Tandler, Peter, Bederson, Benjamin B. and Zierlinger, Alex (2003): Drag-and-Pop and Drag-and-Pick: Techniques for Accessing Remote Screen Content on Touch- and Pen-Operated Systems. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 65.

 
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Ringel, Meredith, Cutrell, Edward, Dumais, Susan and Horvitz, Eric (2003): Milestones in Time: The Value of Landmarks in Retrieving Information from Personal Stores. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 184.

 
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Baudisch, Patrick, Cutrell, Edward and Robertson, George G. (2003): High-Density Cursor: a Visualization Technique that Helps Users Keep Track of Fast-moving Mouse Cursors. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 236.

2002
 
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Hinckley, Ken, Cutrell, Edward, Bathiche, Steve and Muss, Tim (2002): Quantitative analysis of scrolling techniques. In: Terveen, Loren (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2002 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 20-25, 2002, Minneapolis, Minnesota. pp. 65-72.

2001
 
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Dumais, Susan, Cutrell, Edward and Chen, Hao (2001): Optimizing Search by Showing Results in Context. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 277-284.

We developed and evaluated seven interfaces for integrating semantic category information with Web search results. List interfaces were based on the familiar ranked-listing of search results, sometimes augmented with a category name for each result. Category interfaces also showed page titles and/or category names, but re-organized the search results so that items in the same category were grouped together visually. Our user studies show that all Category interfaces were more effective than List interfaces even when lists were augmented with category names for each result. The best category performance was obtained when both category names and individual page titles were presented. Either alone is better than a list presentation, but both together provide the most effective means for allowing users to quickly examining search results. These results provide a better understanding of the perceptual and cognitive factors underlying the advantage of category groupings and provide some practical guidance to Web search interface designers.

© All rights reserved Dumais et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Cutrell, Edward, Czerwinski, Mary and Horvitz, Eric (2001): Notification, Disruption, and Memory: Effects of Messaging Interruptions on Memory and Performance. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT01: Human-Computer Interaction 2001, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 263-269.

 
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LeeTiernan, S., Cutrell, Edward, Czerwinski, Mary and Hoffman, H. (2001): Effective Notification Systems Depend on User Trust. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT01: Human-Computer Interaction 2001, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 684-685.

1994
 
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Czerwinski, Mary, Feldman, Evan M. and Cutrell, Edward (1994): The Influence of Stimulus Dimensions and Training on Visual Search Performance. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 38th Annual Meeting 1994. pp. 1266-1270.

Traditional studies of attention, training and visual search have focused on the use of separable dimensions (usually alphanumeric stimuli), and equating the number of items in consistent versus varied mapping training paradigms. However, the design of visual displays requires a heavy reliance upon configural and integral dimensions (stimuli that group). This set of studies examines the effects of configural dimensions (also using alphanumeric stimuli), as well as equating the number of training trials on specific targets between consistent versus varied mapping conditions. Predictions from extant theories of attention and visual search will be discussed where relevant. Results show that both factors have a large influence on the effects of training in visual search tasks. The influence of these variables needs to be incorporated into current theories of attention and visual search, especially as they are applied to the design of graphical user interfaces and visual displays.

© All rights reserved Czerwinski et al. and/or Human Factors Society

 
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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/edward_cutrell.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1994-2012
Pub. count:35
Number of co-authors:61



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Susan Dumais:7
Ken Hinckley:6
Patrick Baudisch:6

 

 

Productive colleagues

Edward Cutrell's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ravin Balakrishnan:108
Mary Czerwinski:80
Susan Dumais:74
 
 
 
Jul 29

There is an old English folk saying that goes, "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen." I have a different approach: Do something about the heat. The folk saying would have us accept the poor designs of the world. Why? After all, if people were responsible for the "heat" in the first place, then people should be able to do something about it. Is the kitchen too hot? Redesign it.

-- Don Norman

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
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Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
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Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
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