Publication statistics

Pub. period:1997-2009
Pub. count:10
Number of co-authors:21



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Ken Hinckley:4
Benjamin A. Darling:3
Traci H. Downs:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Dennis Proffitt's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ken Hinckley:54
Randy Pausch:31
Victoria Interrant..:26
 
 
 

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Dennis Proffitt

 

Publications by Dennis Proffitt (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Proffitt, Dennis (2009): Obituary Randy Pausch (1960-2008). In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 18 (1) pp. 92-95. Available online

2007
 
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Nishimura, Erin M., Rapoport, Evan D., Darling, Benjamin A., Cervenka, Jason P., Stefanucci, Jeanine, Proffitt, Dennis, Downs, Traci H. and Downs, J. Hunter (2007): Functional Brain Imaging for Analysis of Reading Effort for Computer-Generated Text. In: Jacko, Julie A. (ed.) HCI International 2007 - 12th International Conference - Part II July 22-27, 2007, Beijing, China. pp. 1183-1192. Available online

 
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Nishimura, Erin M., Rapoport, Evan D., Darling, Benjamin A., Proffitt, Dennis, Downs, Traci H. and Downs, J. Hunter (2007): Physiologic System Interfaces Using fNIR with Tactile Feedback for Improving Operator Effectiveness. In: Schmorrow, Dylan and Reeves, Leah (eds.) FAC 2007 - Foundations of Augmented Cognition - Third International Conference July 22-27, 2007, Beijing, China. pp. 323-328. Available online

 
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Wubbels, Peter, Nishimura, Erin M., Rapoport, Evan D., Darling, Benjamin A., Proffitt, Dennis, Downs, Traci H. and Downs, J. Hunter (2007): Exploring Calibration Techniques for Functional Near-Infrared Imaging (fNIR) Controlled Brain-Computer Interfaces. In: Schmorrow, Dylan and Reeves, Leah (eds.) FAC 2007 - Foundations of Augmented Cognition - Third International Conference July 22-27, 2007, Beijing, China. pp. 23-29. Available online

 
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Interrante, Victoria, Kearney, Joseph K., Proffitt, Dennis, II, J. Edward Swan and Thompson, William B. (2007): Spatial Perception in Immersive Virtual Environments: New Theories and Current Controversies. In: Sherman, William R., Lin, Ming C. and Steed, Anthony (eds.) IEEE Virtual Reality Conference, VR 2007 10-14 March, 2007, Charlotte, NC, USA. pp. 315-316.

2005
 
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Banton, Thomas, Stefanucci, Jeanine, Durgin, Frank H., Fass, Adam M. and Proffitt, Dennis (2005): The Perception of Walking Speed in a Virtual Environment. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 14 (4) pp. 394-406.

1998
 
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Hinckley, Ken, Pausch, Randy, Proffitt, Dennis and Kassell, Neal F. (1998): Two-Handed Virtual Manipulation. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 5 (3) pp. 260-302. Available online

We discuss a two-handed user interface designed to support three-dimensional neurosurgical visualization. By itself, this system is a "point design," an example of an advanced user interface technique. In this work, we argue that in order to understand why interaction techniques do or do not work, and to suggest possibilities for new techniques, it is important to move beyond point design and to introduce careful scientific measurement of human behavioral principles. In particular, we argue that the common-sense viewpoint that "two hands save time by working in parallel" may not always be an effective way to think about two-handed interface design because the hands do not necessarily work in parallel (there is a structure to two-handed manipulation) and because two hands do more than just save time over one hand (two hands provide the user with more information and can structure how the user thinks about a task). To support these claims, we present an interface design developed in collaboration with neurosurgeons which has undergone extensive informal usability testing, as well as a pair of formal experimental studies which investigate behavioral aspects of two-handed virtual object manipulation. Our hope is that this discussion will help others to apply the lessons learned in our neurosurgery application to future two-handed user interface designs.

© All rights reserved Hinckley et al. and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Hinckley, Ken, Pausch, Randy, Proffitt, Dennis, Patten, James and Kassell, Neal F. (1997): Cooperative Bimanual Action. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 27-34. Available online

We present an experiment on cooperative bimanual action. Right-handed subjects manipulated a pair of physical objects, a tool and a target object, so that the tool would touch a target on the object (fig. 1). For this task, there is a marked specialization of the hands. Performance is best when the left hand orients the target object and the right hand manipulates the tool, but is significantly reduced when these roles are reversed. This suggests that the right hand operates relative to the frame-of-reference of the left hand. Furthermore, when physical constraints guide the tool placement, this fundamentally changes the type of motor control required. The task is tremendously simplified for both hands, and reversing roles of the hands is no longer an important factor. Thus, specialization of the roles of the hands is significant only for skilled manipulation.

© All rights reserved Hinckley et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hinckley, Ken, Tullio, Joe, Pausch, Randy, Proffitt, Dennis and Kassell, Neal F. (1997): Usability Analysis of 3D Rotation Techniques. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 1-10. Available online

We report results from a formal user study of interactive 3D rotation using the mouse-driven Virtual Sphere and Arcball techniques, as well as multidimensional input techniques based on magnetic orientation sensors. Multidimensional input is often assumed to allow users to work quickly, but at the cost of precision, due to the instability of the hand moving in the open air. We show that, at least for the orientation matching task used in this experiment, users can take advantage of the integrated degrees of freedom provided by multidimensional input without necessarily sacrificing precision: using multidimensional input, users completed the experimental task up to 36% faster without any statistically detectable loss of accuracy. We also report detailed observations of common usability problems when first encountering the techniques. Our observations suggest some design issues for 3D input devices. For example, the physical form-factors of the 3D input device significantly influenced user acceptance of otherwise identical input sensors. The device should afford some tactile cues, so the user can feel its orientation without looking at it. In the absence of such cues, some test users were unsure of how to use the device.

© All rights reserved Hinckley et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hinckley, Ken, Pausch, Randy F. and Proffitt, Dennis (1997): Attention and Visual Feedback: The Bimanual Frame of Reference. In: SI3D 1997 1997. pp. 121-126,192. Available online

 
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