Publication statistics

Pub. period:1986-2014
Pub. count:47
Number of co-authors:60



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

H. Rex Hartson:11
J. Edward Swan II:8
Joseph L. Gabbard:8

 

 

Productive colleagues

Deborah Hix's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Edward A. Fox:109
Jakob Nielsen:109
Dieter Schmalstieg:86
 
 
 
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Deborah Hix

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Publications by Deborah Hix (bibliography)

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2014
 
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Hartson, Rex and Hix, Deborah (2014). The User Action Framework. Retrieved 16 June 2014 from http://courses.cs.vt.edu/~cs5714/fall2001/notes/pdf/06_UAF_guides.pdf

2007
 
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Gabbard, Joseph L., II, J. Edward Swan, Hix, Deborah, Kim, Si-Jung and Fitch, Greg (2007): Active Text Drawing Styles for Outdoor Augmented Reality: A User-Based Study and Design Implications. In: Sherman, William R., Lin, Ming C. and Steed, Anthony (eds.) IEEE Virtual Reality Conference, VR 2007 10-14 March, 2007, Charlotte, NC, USA. pp. 35-42.

2006
 
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Gabbard, Joseph L., II, J. Edward Swan and Hix, Deborah (2006): The Effects of Text Drawing Styles, Background Textures, and Natural Lighting on Text Legibility in Outdoor Augmented Reality. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 15 (1) pp. 16-32.

2004
 
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Hix, Deborah, Gabbard, Joseph L., II, J. Edward Swan, Livingston, Mark A., Höllerer, Tobias, Julier, Simon, Baillot, Yohan and Brown, Dennis (2004): A Cost-Effective Usability Evaluation Progression for Novel Interactive Systems. In: HICSS 2004 2004. .

 
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II, J. Edward Swan, Gabbard, Joseph L., Hix, Deborah, Ellis, Steve and Adelstein, Bernard D. (2004): Conducting Human-Subject Experiments with Virtual and Augmented Reality. In: IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2004 VR 2004 27-31 March, 2004, Chicago, IL, USA. p. 266.

2003
 
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Amento, Brian, Terveen, Loren, Hill, Will, Hix, Deborah and Schulman, Robert S. (2003): Experiments in social data mining: The TopicShop system. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 10 (1) pp. 54-85.

Social data mining systems enable people to share opinions and benefit from each other's experience. They do this by mining and redistributing information from computational records of social activity such as Usenet messages, system usage history, citations, or hyperlinks. Some general questions for evaluating such systems are: (1) is the extracted information valuable? and (2) do interfaces based on the information improve user task performance? We report here on TopicShop, a system that mines information from the structure and content of Web pages and provides an exploratory information workspace interface. We carried out experiments that yielded positive answers to both evaluation questions. First, a number of automatically computable features about Web sites do a good job of predicting expert quality judgments about sites. Second, compared to popular Web search interfaces, the TopicShop interface to this information lets users select significantly more high-quality sites, in less time and with less effort, and to organize the sites they select into personally meaningful collections more quickly and easily. We conclude by discussing how our results may be applied and considering how they touch on general issues concerning quality, expertise, and consensus.

© All rights reserved Amento et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Livingston, Mark A., II, J. Edward Swan, Gabbard, Joseph L., Höllerer, Tobias, Hix, Deborah, Julier, Simon, Baillot, Yohan and Brown, Dennis (2003): Resolving Multiple Occluded Layers in Augmented Reality. In: 2003 IEEE and ACM International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality ISMAR 2003 7-10 October, 2003, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 56-65.

 
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II, J. Edward Swan, Gabbard, Joseph L., Hix, Deborah, Schulman, Robert S. and Kim, Keun Pyo (2003): A Comparative Study of User Performance in a Map-Based Virtual Environment. In: IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2003 VR 2003 22-26 March, 2003, Los Angeles, CA, USA. pp. 259-.

 
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Wingrave, Chadwick A., Hix, Deborah, Schmalstieg, Dieter, MacIntyre, Blair, Bowman, Doug A. and Mine, Mark R. (2003): Mixed Reality: The Continuum from Virtual to Augmented Reality. In: IEEE Virtual Reality Conference 2003 VR 2003 22-26 March, 2003, Los Angeles, CA, USA. pp. 121-124.

2002
 
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Nowell, Lucy T., Schulman, Robert S. and Hix, Deborah (2002): Graphical Encoding for Information Visualization: An Empirical Study. In: InfoVis 2002 - 2002 IEEE Symposium on Information Visualization 27 October - 1 November, 2002, Boston, MA, USA. pp. 43-50.

 
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Robertson, Gretchen L. and Hix, Deborah (2002): Making the computer accessible to mentally retarded adults. In Communications of the ACM, 45 (4) pp. 171-183.

2000
 
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Amento, Brian, Terveen, Loren, Hill, Will and Hix, Deborah (2000): TopicShop: Enhanced Support for Evaluating and Organizing Collections of Web Sites. In: Ackerman, Mark S. and Edwards, Keith (eds.) Proceedings of the 13th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 2000, San Diego, California, United States. pp. 201-209.

1999
 
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Amento, Brian, Hill, Will, Terveen, Loren, Ju, Peter and Hix, Deborah (1999): An Empirical Evaluation of User Interfaces for Topic Management of Web Sites. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 552-559.

Topic management is the task of gathering, evaluating, organizing, and sharing a set of web sites for a specific topic. Current web tools do not provide adequate support for this task. We created the TopicShop system to address this need. TopicShop includes (1) a webcrawler that discovers relevant web sites and builds site profiles, and (2) user interfaces for exploring and organizing sites. We conducted an empirical study comparing user performance with TopicShop vs. Yahoo. TopicShop subjects found over 80% more high-quality sites (where quality was determined by independent expert judgements) while browsing only 81% as many sites and completing their task in 89% of the time. The site profile data that TopicShop provides -- in particular, the number of pages on a site and the number of other sites that link to it -- was the key to these results, as users exploited it to identify the most promising sites quickly and easily.

© All rights reserved Amento et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hix, Deborah, II, J. Edward Swan, Gabbard, Joseph L., McGee, Mike, Durbin, Jim and King, Tony (1999): User-Centered Design and Evaluation of a Real-Time Battlefield Visualization Virtual Environment. In: VR 1999 1999. pp. 96-103.

 
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Gabbard, Joseph L., Hix, Deborah and II, J. Edward Swan (1999): User-Centered Design and Evaluation of Virtual Environments. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 19 (6) pp. 51-59.

1996
 
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Nowell, Lucy Terry, France, Robert K., Hix, Deborah, Heath, Lenwood S. and Fox, Edward A. (1996): Visualizing Search Results: Some Alternatives to Query-Document Similarity. In: Proceedings of the 19th Annual International ACM SIGIR Conference on Research and Development in Information Retrieval 1996. pp. 67-75.

A digital library of computer science literature, Envision provides powerful information visualization by displaying search results as a matrix of icons, with layout semantics under user control. Envision's Graphic View interacts with an Item Summary Window giving users access to bibliographic information, and XMosaic provides access to complete bibliographic information, abstracts, and full content. While many visualization interfaces for information retrieval systems depict ranked query-document similarity, Envision graphically presents a variety of document characteristics and supports an extensive range of user tasks. Formative usability evaluation results show great user satisfaction with Envision's style of presentation and the document characteristics visualized.

© All rights reserved Nowell et al. and/or ACM Press

1995
 
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Hix, Deborah, Templeman, James N. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (1995): Pre-Screen Projection: From Concept to Testing of a New Interaction Technique. In: Katz, Irvin R., Mack, Robert L., Marks, Linn, Rosson, Mary Beth and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 95 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 7-11, 1995, Denver, Colorado. pp. 226-233.

Pre-screen projection is a new interaction technique that allows a user to pan and zoom integrally through a scene simply by moving his or her head relative to the screen. The underlying concept is based on real-world visual perception, namely, the fact that a person's view changes as the head moves. Pre-screen projection tracks a user's head in three dimensions and alters the display on the screen relative to head position, giving a natural perspective effect in response to a user's head movements. Specifically, projection of a virtual scene is calculated as if the scene were in front of the screen. As a result, the visible scene displayed on the physical screen expands (zooms) dramatically as a user moves nearer. This is analogous to the real world, where the nearer an object is, the more rapidly it visually expands as a person moves toward it. Further, with pre-screen projection a user can navigate (pan and zoom) around a scene integrally, as one unified activity, rather than performing panning and zooming as separate tasks. This paper describes the technique, the real-world metaphor on which it is conceptually based, issues involved in iterative development of the technique, and our approach to its empirical evaluation in a realistic application testbed.

© All rights reserved Hix et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Brock, Derek, Hix, Deborah, Dievendorf, Lynn and Trafton, J. Gregory (1995): Extending the User Action Notation for Research in Individual Differences. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 39th Annual Meeting 1995. pp. 253-257.

Software user interfaces that provide users with more than one device, such as a mouse and keyboard, for interactively performing tasks, are now commonplace. Concerns about how to represent individual differences in patterns of use and acquisition of skill in such interfaces led the authors to develop modifications to the standard format of the User Action Notation (UAN) that substantially augment the notation's expressive power. These extensions allow the reader of an interface specification to make meaningful comparisons between functionally equivalent interaction techniques and task performance strategies in interfaces supporting multiple input devices. Furthermore, they offer researchers a new methodology for analyzing the behavioral aspects of user interfaces. These modifications are documented and their benefits discussed.

© All rights reserved Brock et al. and/or Human Factors Society

 
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Hix, Deborah, Templeman, James N., Gosain, Ankush and Danderkar, Kapil (1995): A Methodology for Developing New Interaction Techniques. In: Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction July 9-14, 1995, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 109-114.

We present a methodology for inventing, implementing, and evaluating new interaction techniques. We illustrate use of this methodology using examples of some of the more interesting issues we encountered in developing a new interaction technique for head-coupled panning and zooming, called pre-screen projection.

© All rights reserved Hix et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Hix, Deborah (1995): Usability Evaluation: How Does It Relate to Software Engineering?. In: Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction July 9-14, 1995, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 355-360.

We present an integrated set of activities for development of both user interface and non-interface components in an interactive system. Within the context of these activities for both software and user interface engineering, we present several types of techniques for evaluation of usability. For each technique, we give examples, strengths and weaknesses, and results of its use at appropriate stages in the software engineering process.

© All rights reserved Hix and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Heath, Lenwood S., Hix, Deborah, Nowell, Lucy T., Wake, William C., Averboch, Guillermo A., Labow, Eric, Guyer, Scott A., Brueni, Dennis J., France, Robert K., Dalal, Kaushal and Fox, Edward A. (1995): Envision: A User-Centered Database of Computer Science Literature. In Communications of the ACM, 38 (4) pp. 52-53.

1994
 
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Hix, Deborah, Hartson, H. Rex and Nielsen, Jakob (1994): A Taxonomy for Developing High Impact Formative Usability Evaluation Methods. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (4) pp. 20-22.

 
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Robertson, Gretchen L. and Hix, Deborah (1994): User Interface Design Guidelines for Computer Accessibility by Mentally Retarded Adults. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors and Ergonomics Society 38th Annual Meeting 1994. pp. 300-304.

An exploratory three-phase study examined the ability of adults diagnosed as moderately developmentally disabled to successfully use a personal computer, input devices preferred, and user interface design factors to be considered when designing or selecting applications for this population. Phase I observed the reaction of the participants, none of whom had ever used a computer, to a graphical user interface. In Phase II usability tests compared the mouse, the trackball, and the touchscreen to gather heuristic data on input device preference and develop user interface design guidelines for applications for the target population. Phase III tested the guidelines by developing two prototype games: "Shopping," designed to teach money-handling skills, and "Getting Dressed," to teach a basic life skill. Phase I showed that participants liked and understood the graphical user interface. All could use the touchscreen, and most could use the mouse. Phase II usability testing found that the mouse was preferred over the touchscreen and the trackball, although its drag-drop times were longer. Reasons given were less fatigue and greater control. Phase III found participants preferred screens that allowed them to control the action, that quick or unexpected screen responses were upsetting, and that strong, realistic visual feedback was important. The study is seen as a first step in developing guidelines to make the computer accessible to those with moderate developmental disability.

© All rights reserved Robertson and Hix and/or Human Factors Society

1993
 
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Hix, Deborah and Hartson, H. Rex (1993): Developing User Interfaces: Ensuring Usability Through Product and Process. New York, New York, John Wiley and Sons

 
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Hartson, H. Rex and Hix, Deborah (eds.) (1993): Advances in Human-Computer Interaction. Norwood, NJ, Intellect

 
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Chase, J. D., Paretti, Marie, Hartson, H. Rex and Hix, Deborah (1993): Task-Oriented User Documentation Using the User Action Notation: A Case Study. In: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1993. pp. 421-426.

Good documentation is a critical component of usable systems. While documentation commonly focuses on system features and functions, it is often more effective when based on a user- and task-oriented view. It must also keep pace with rapid changes in the design of a system during an iterative development process. The User Action Notation (UAN), a user- and task-oriented notation that describes the behavior of the user and the interface during their cooperative performance of a task, helps support these requirements. We present a case study of an industrial software development project that used the UAN as part of the documentation process, and show how the UAN supported translation from an interface design to user documentation.

© All rights reserved Chase et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Nowell, Lucy Terry and Hix, Deborah (1993): Visualizing Search Results: User Interface Development for the Project Envision Database of Computer Science Literature. In: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1993. pp. 56-61.

Project Envision, a large research effort at Virginia Tech, focuses on developing a user centered, multimedia database from the computer science literature, with full text searching and full content retrieval capabilities. Available bibliographic databases and on-line public access catalogs present search results as lists of text. We describe the Envision search results display, which presents search results in a Graphic View window as a scatterplot of document icons, with the semantic value of six icon attributes under user control. Bibliographic information about user-selected documents is displayed in an Item Summary window, while the document abstract and other user-selected data are available in a Preview Item window. Results of formative usability evaluation are discussed.

© All rights reserved Nowell and Hix and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Chase, J. D., Hartson, H. Rex, Hix, Deborah, Schulman, Robert S. and Brandenburg, Jeffrey L. (1993): A Model of Behavioral Techniques for Representing User Interface Designs. In: Proceedings of the Fifth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1993. pp. 861-866.

A user-centered approach to interactive system development requires a way to represent the behavior of a user interacting with an interface. While a number of behavioral representation techniques exist, not all provide the capabilities necessary to support the development process. Based on observations of existing representations and comments from users of the User Action Notation (UAN), a user- and task-centered behavioral representation, we have developed a model that classifies behavioral representations according to scope, in terms of activities they support within the development process; content, in terms of components of interaction designs they can represent; and requirements for documentation and communication within and among various development activities. We present results demonstrating the model's reliability in the context of two problems, critical incident classification and evaluation of existing techniques.

© All rights reserved Chase et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Nowell, Lucy Terry, Hix, Deborah and Labow, Eric D. (1993): Query Composition: Why Does It Have to be So Hard?. In: East-West International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction: Proceedings of the EWHCI93 1993. pp. 226-241.

Project Envision, a large research effort at Virginia Tech, focuses on developing a user centered, multimedia database from the computer science literature, with full-text searching and full-content retrieval capabilities. User interviews indicate that people have trouble composing queries. Widely available boolean retrieval systems present problems with both syntax and logic. Natural language queries for vector space retrieval systems are easier to compose, but users complain that they do not understand the matching principles used; users also complain that they have too little control over the search and fear being overwhelmed by an enormous retrieval set. We describe the Envision query window, which has as a usability goal making query composition easy while increasing user control. Results of formative usability evaluation and subsequent redesign are discussed.

© All rights reserved Nowell et al. and/or Intl. Centre for Scientific And Technical Information

 
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Fox, Edward A., Hix, Deborah, Nowell, Lucy T., Brueni, Dennis J., Wake, William C., Heath, Lenwood S. and Rao, Durgesh (1993): Users, User Interfaces, and Objects: Envision, a Digital Library. In JASIST - Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 44 (8) pp. 480-491.

1992
 
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Hix, Deborah and Ryan, Tim (1992): Evaluating User Interface Development Tools. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 36th Annual Meeting 1992. pp. 374-378.

This paper describes a procedure for quantitatively evaluating and comparing user interface development tools, and presents results of evaluating for user interface development tools with the procedure. For each tool, summary numeric ratings for functionality and usability are presented. General conclusions about the four tools and about the tool evaluation procedure itself are also discussed.

© All rights reserved Hix and Ryan and/or Human Factors Society

 
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Ashlund, Stacey and Hix, Deborah (1992): IDEAL: A Software Tool to Evaluate Interface Usability. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 36th Annual Meeting 1992. pp. 414-417.

This paper reports on the design, prototype implementation, and formative evaluation of a software tool -- IDEAL (Interface Design Environment and Analysis Lattice). IDEAL integrates usability engineering techniques and behavioral task representations with a graphical hierarchy of user tasks to support formative evaluation of an evolving user interface. Representative users of IDEAL -- interface designers and evaluators -- participated in two phases of formative evaluation of IDEAL. Empirical evaluation showed IDEAL to be useful as an automated tool for managing the interrelated tasks of user interface development, including interaction design, usability specification, creation of benchmark tasks, and formative evaluation, that are currently performed manually.

© All rights reserved Ashlund and Hix and/or Human Factors Society

1991
 
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Siochi, Antonio C. and Hix, Deborah (1991): A Study of Computer-Supported User Interface Evaluation Using Maximal Repeating Pattern Analysis. In: Robertson, Scott P., Olson, Gary M. and Olson, Judith S. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 91 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 28 - June 5, 1991, New Orleans, Louisiana. pp. 301-305.

Maximal repeating pattern (MRP) analysis is a recently developed user interface evaluation technique that uses an algorithm to analyze transcripts of user sessions by detecting repeated user actions. Encouraged by results of an initial study of the MRP technique, we conducted a study in which we evaluated a simple prototype interface using both the MRP technique and observation. Interface problems found by observation were also found by MRP analysis. Although the MRP algorithm produced large amounts of data that an interface evaluator had to analyze, we found that by mapping raw user inputs in the transcripts into more abstract classes via prefiltering, we could perform more useful MRP analyses.

© All rights reserved Siochi and Hix and/or ACM Press

 
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Melder, Karl and Hix, Deborah (1991): Task-Based Modeling of the User Population of a Complex Interactive System Domain. In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 35th Annual Meeting 1991. pp. 430-433.

This paper reports an investigation into issues concerning the user population for a complex interactive systems domain, namely image processing. A variety of image processing systems are available, attempting to provide broad applicability, but are often complicated to understand and hard to use. One difficulty in producing an image processing system is defining its user population. In the image processing domain, this is a challenge because image processing has a diverse population of users, with great variances in user expertise and expectations. To better understand the process of classifying users of complex interactive systems, we conducted a study to define the user population of image processing systems, and to determine their common goals and tasks. First, we produced a task-based model of the user population of image processing systems, with levels in the model representing classes of tasks users perform with an image processing system. We then conduced a semi-structured interview and an ordering task to gather data to validate this model. Subjects were a broad variety of image processing users at Virginia Tech. We also had each subject complete a questionnaire to help identify common goals and tasks among image processing users. Results indicate validity of the model for classifying image processing user populations. Results provide the basis for continued research in a domain that requires highly flexible and adaptable interfaces to functionally complex systems. Further development of the model can provide image processing system developers with requirements for baseline functionality of an image processing systems.

© All rights reserved Melder and Hix and/or Human Factors Society

 
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Hix, Deborah and Schulman, Robert S. (1991): Human-Computer Interface Development Tools: A Methodology for Their Evaluation. In Communications of the ACM, 34 (3) pp. 75-87.

1990
 
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Hartson, H. Rex, Siochi, Antonio C. and Hix, Deborah (1990): The UAN: A User-Oriented Representation for Direct Manipulation Interface Designs. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 8 (3) pp. 181-203.

Many existing interface representation techniques, especially those associated with UIMS, are constructional and focused on interface implementation, and therefore do not adequately support a user-centered focus. But it is in the behavioral domain of the user that interface designers and evaluators do their work. We are seeking to complement constructional methods by providing a tool-supported technique capable of specifying the behavioral aspects of an interactive system-the tasks and the actions a user performs to accomplish those tasks. In particular, this paper is a practical introduction to use of the User Action Notation (UAN), a task- and user-oriented notation for behavioral representation of asynchronous, direct manipulation interface designs. Interfaces are specified in UAN as a quasihierarchy of asynchronous tasks. At the lower levels, user actions are associated with feedback and system state changes. The notation makes use of visually onomatopoeic symbols and is simple enough to read with little instruction. UAN is being used by growing numbers of interface developers and researchers. In addition to its design role, current research is investigating how UAN can support production and maintenance of code and documentation.

© All rights reserved Hartson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hix, Deborah and Casaday, George (1990): Report of the Working Group on Interface Design Decisions and Representation. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 22 (2) pp. 34-36.

 
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Leahy, Michael and Hix, Deborah (1990): Effect of Touch Screen Target Location on User Accuracy. In: D., Woods, and E., Roth, (eds.) Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 34th Annual Meeting 1990, Santa Monica, USA. pp. 370-374.

Users can be frustrated by touch screen applications that inaccurately record their touches. Enlarging touch sensitive regions can improve touch accuracy, but few specific quantitative guidelines are available. This paper reports on a controlled experiment that investigated the effect of target location and horizontal viewing location on user accuracy. Measurements showed that persons tended to touch below the target, with touch distance increasing as the target location moved down the screen. In addition, they tended to touch toward the sides of the screen. Using collected data for each of nine screen sectors, graphs were prepared that show the relationship between touch target size and expected accuracy. For example, a 36 mm{squared} target in the top left sector would be expected to accurately record 99% of its touches. The empirically-derived, quantitative guidelines will help designers create screens that decrease user errors and frustration.

© All rights reserved Leahy and Hix and/or Human Factors Society

1989
 
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Hartson, H. Rex and Hix, Deborah (1989): Human-computer interface development: concepts and systems for its management. In ACM Computing Surveys (CSUR), 21 (1) pp. 5-92.

 
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Hix, Deborah (1989): A Procedure for Evaluating Human-Computer Interface Development Tools. In: Sibert, John L. (ed.) Proceedings of the 2nd annual ACM SIGGRAPH symposium on User interface software and technology November 13 - 15, 1989, Williamsburg, Virginia, United States. pp. 53-61.

 
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Hix, Deborah (1989): Developing and Evaluating an Interactive System for Producing Human-Computer Interfaces. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 8 (4) pp. 285-299.

The Author's Interactive Dialogue Environment (AIDE) of the Dialogue Management System is an integrated set of interactive tools for developing human-computer interfaces. AIDE is used by an interface specialist, called a dialogue developer, to implement an interface by directly manipulating and defining its objects, rather than by the traditional method of writing source code. This paper describes the structural dialogue transaction model upon which AIDE is based, describes the use of AIDE for developing human-computer interfaces, and describes an empirical study comparing use of AIDE with use of a programming language for implementing a human-computer interface. Results of this study empirically support, possibly for the first time, the claim that interactive tools for interface development, such as AIDE, can improve productivity and reduce frustration in developing interfaces over traditional programming techniques for interface development.

© All rights reserved Hix and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Hartson, H. Rex and Hix, Deborah (1989): Toward Empirically Derived Methodologies and Tools for Human-Computer Interface Development. In International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 31 (4) pp. 477-494.

 
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Hix, Deborah, Tan, Kay C. and Schulman, Robert S. (1989): Development and Testing of an Evaluation Procedure for User Interface Management Systems (UIMS). In: Proceedings of the Human Factors Society 33rd Annual Meeting 1989. pp. 264-267.

A user interface management system of UIMS is an interactive system for supporting the design, production, and execution of human-computer interfaces. This paper reports on the development and empirical testing of an evaluation procedure to produce quantifiable criteria for evaluating and comparing UIMS. The form-based evaluation procedure results in quantitative ratings along two dimensions: functionality and usability. Specification/implementation techniques used by a UIMS are also quantitatively rated. An empirical study has indicated that the procedure produces reliable, useful results.

© All rights reserved Hix et al. and/or Human Factors Society

 
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Hartson, H. Rex, Hix, Deborah and Stoff, Susan (1989): Empirically Determined Guidelines for Use of Human-Computer Interface Recording Techniques. In: Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1989. pp. 667-674.

This paper reports on a study to explore the feasibility of creating state diagrams and supervised flow diagrams (SFDs) from human-computer dialogue scenarios. The goal was to facilitate a dialogue developer with this process and to produce a means by which developers can create consistent, correct diagrams. Diagrams produced by experimental subjects were analyzed for consistency and correctness, and a set of guidelines was empirically produced to clarify issues underlying the diagrammatic errors that were discovered. Then, use of these guidelines by subjects with previous experience in producing the diagrams was shown to result in more consistent and accurate diagrams.

© All rights reserved Hartson et al. and/or Lawrence Erlbaum Associates

1988
 
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Hix, Deborah (ed.) (1988): Advances in Human-Computer Interaction. Norwood, NJ, Intellect

 Cited in the following chapter:

Semiotics: [/encyclopedia/semiotics_and_human-computer_interaction.html]


 
1987
 
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Hix, Deborah and Hartson, H. Rex (1987): A Structural Model for Hierarchically Describing Human-Computer Dialogue. In: Bullinger, Hans-Jorg and Shackel, Brian (eds.) INTERACT 87 - 2nd IFIP International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction September 1-4, 1987, Stuttgart, Germany. pp. 695-700.

A variety of "dialogue models" has sprung into existence over the last decade in response to the need for organizing the process of human-computer dialogue development. Structural models describe the generic process of human-computer interaction, and can be used to guide a dialogue developer in constructing the dialogue. The dialogue transaction model presented in this paper is such a structural, descriptive model. It identifies linguistic objects in the behavioral domain, and defines linguistic processing of those objects in the constructional domain of the dialogue. This paper presents the model, how it was derived, and how it is used to describe human-computer dialogues.

© All rights reserved Hix and Hartson and/or North-Holland

1986
 
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Hix, Deborah and Hartson, H. Rex (1986): An Interactive Environment for Dialogue Development: Its Design, Use, and Evaluation; or, Is AIDE Useful?. In: Mantei, Marilyn and Orbeton, Peter (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 86 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 13-17, 1986, Boston, Massachusetts. pp. 228-234.

The Author's Interactive Dialogue Environment (AIDE) of the Dialogue Management System is an integrated set of direct manipulation tools used by a dialogue author to design and implement human-computer interfaces without writing source code. This paper presents the conceptual dialogue transaction model upon which AIDE is based, describes AIDE, and illustrates how a dialogue author develops an interface using AIDE. A preliminary empirical evaluation of the use of AIDE versus the use of a programming language to implement an interface shows very encouraging results.

© All rights reserved Hix and Hartson and/or ACM Press

 
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24 Jun 2007: Modified
23 Jun 2007: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/deborah_hix.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1986-2014
Pub. count:47
Number of co-authors:60



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

H. Rex Hartson:11
J. Edward Swan II:8
Joseph L. Gabbard:8

 

 

Productive colleagues

Deborah Hix's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Edward A. Fox:109
Jakob Nielsen:109
Dieter Schmalstieg:86
 
 
 
Jul 25

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