Publication statistics

Pub. period:1990-2001
Pub. count:9
Number of co-authors:16



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Chris Schmandt:4
Mark S. Ackerman:4
Scott D. Mainwaring:3

 

 

Productive colleagues

Debby Hindus's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Elizabeth D. Mynat..:71
Mark S. Ackerman:67
Chris Schmandt:40
 
 
 

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Debby Hindus

 

Publications by Debby Hindus (bibliography)

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2001
 
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Hindus, Debby, Mainwaring, Scott D., Leduc, Nicole, Hagstrom, Anna Elisabeth and Bayley, Oliver (2001): Casablanca: Designing Social Communication Devices for the Home. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 325-332. Available online

The Casablanca project explored how media space concepts could be incorporated into households and family life. This effort included prototypes built for the researchers' own home use, field studies of households, and consumer testing of design concepts. A number of previously unreported consumer preferences and concerns were uncovered and incorporated into several original prototypes, most notably ScanBoard and the Intentional Presence Lamp. Casablanca also resulted in conclusions about designing household social communication devices.

© All rights reserved Hindus et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Singer, Andrew, Hindus, Debby, Stifelman, Lisa and White, Sean (1999): Tangible Progress: Less is More in Somewire Audio Spaces. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 104-111. Available online

We developed four widely different interfaces for users of Somewire, a prototype audio-only media space. We informally studied users' experiences with the two screen-based interfaces. We prototyped a non-screen-based interface as an example of a novel tangible interface for a communication system. We explored the conflict between privacy and simplicity of representation, and identified two unresolved topics: the role of audio quality and the prospects for scaling audio spaces beyond a single workgroup. Finally, we formulated a set of design guidelines for control and representation in audio spaces, as follows: GUIs are not well-suited to audio spaces, users do not require control over localization or other audio attributes, and awareness of other users' presence is desirable.

© All rights reserved Singer et al. and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Ackerman, Mark S., Hindus, Debby, Mainwaring, Scott D. and Starr, Brian (1997): Hanging on the 'Wire: A Field Study of an Audio-Only Media Space. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 4 (1) pp. 39-66. Available online

The primary focus of this article is an analysis of an audio-only media space from a computer-supported cooperative work (CSCW) perspective. To explore whether audio by itself is suitable for shared media systems, we studied a workgroup using an audio-only media space. This media space, called Thunderwire, combined high-quality audio with open connections to create a shared space for its users. The two-month field study provided a richly nuanced understanding of this audio space's social use. The system afforded rich sociable interactions. As well, users were able to create a useful, usable social space; however, through an analysis of the social norms that the participants formulated, we show that they had to take into account being in an audio-only environment. Within the field study, then, audio by itself was sufficient for a usable media space and a useful social space, but users were forced to adapt to many audio-only and system conditions. The article also considers audio's implications for privacy.

© All rights reserved Ackerman et al. and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Hindus, Debby, Ackerman, Mark S., Mainwaring, Scott D. and Starr, Brian (1996): Thunderwire: A Field Study of an Audio-Only Media Space. In: Olson, Gary M., Olson, Judith S. and Ackerman, Mark S. (eds.) Proceedings of the 1996 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 1996, Boston, Massachusetts, United States. pp. 238-247. Available online

To explore the potential of using audio by itself in a shared media system, we studied a workgroup using an audio-only media space. This media space, called Thunderwire, combined high-quality audio with open connections to create a shared space for its users. The two-month field study provided a richly nuanced understanding of this audio space's social use. The system afforded rich sociable interactions. Indeed, within the field study, audio by itself afforded a telepresent environment for its users. However while a usable media space and a useful social space, Thunderwire required its users to adapt to many audio-only conditions.

© All rights reserved Hindus et al. and/or ACM Press

1995
 
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Hindus, Debby, Arons, Barry, Stifelman, Lisa, Gaver, William, Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Back, Maribeth (1995): Designing Auditory Interactions for PDAs. In: Robertson, George G. (ed.) Proceedings of the 8th annual ACM symposium on User interface and software technology November 15 - 17, 1995, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, United States. pp. 143-146. Available online

This panel addresses issues in designing audio-based user interactions for small, personal computing devices, or PDAs. One issue is the nature of interacting with an auditory PDA and the interplay of affordances and form factors. Another issue is how both new and traditional metaphors and interaction concepts might be applied to auditory PDAs. The utility and design of nonspeech cues are discussed, as are the aesthetic issues of persona and narrative in designing sounds. Also discussed are commercially available sound and speech components and related hardware tradeoffs. Finally, the social implications of auditory interactions are explored, including privacy, fashion and novel social interactions.

© All rights reserved Hindus et al. and/or ACM Press

1993
 
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Hindus, Debby, Schmandt, Chris and Horner, Chris (1993): Capturing, Structuring, and Representing Ubiquitous Audio. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 11 (4) pp. 376-400. Available online

Although talking is an integral part of collaboration, there has been little computer support for acquiring and accessing the contents of conversations. Our approach has focused on ubiquitous audio, or the unobtrusive capture of speech interactions in everyday work environments. Speech recognition technology cannot yet transcribe fluent conversational speech, so the words themselves are not available for organizing the captured interactions. Instead, the structure of an interaction is derived from acoustical information inherent in the stored speech and augmented by user interaction during or after capture. This article describes applications for capturing and structuring audio from office discussions and telephone calls, and mechanisms for later retrieval of these stored interactions. An important aspect of retrieval is choosing an appropriate visual representation, and this article describes the evolution of a family of representations across a range of applications. Finally, this work is placed within the broader context of desktop audio, mobile audio applications, and social implications.

© All rights reserved Hindus et al. and/or ACM Press

1992
 
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Hindus, Debby and Schmandt, Chris (1992): Ubiquitous Audio: Capturing Spontaneous Collaboration. In: Proceedings of the 1992 ACM conference on Computer-supported cooperative work November 01 - 04, 1992, Toronto, Ontario, Canada. pp. 210-217. Available online

Although talking is an integral part of collaborative activity, there has been little computer support for acquiring and accessing the contents of conversations. Our approach has focused on ubiquitous audio, or the unobtrusive capture of voice interactions in everyday work environments. Because the words themselves are not available for organizing the captured interactions, structure is derived from acoustical information inherent in the stored voice and augmented by user interaction during or after capture. This paper describes applications for capturing and structuring audio from office discussions and telephone calls, and mechanisms for later retrieval of these stored interactions.

© All rights reserved Hindus and Schmandt and/or ACM Press

1990
 
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Schmandt, Chris, Hindus, Debby, Ackerman, Mark S. and Manandhar, Sanjay (1990): Observations on Using Speech Input for Window Navigation. In: Diaper, Dan, Gilmore, David J., Cockton, Gilbert and Shackel, Brian (eds.) INTERACT 90 - 3rd IFIP International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction August 27-31, 1990, Cambridge, UK. pp. 787-793.

We discuss the suitability of speech recognition for navigating within a window system and we describe Xspeak, an implementation of voice control for the X Window System. We made this interface available to a number of student programmers, and compared the use of speech and a pointer for window navigation through empirical and observational means. Our experience indicates that speech was attractive for some users, and we comment on their activities and recognition accuracy. These observations reveal pitfalls and advantages of using speech input in windows systems.

© All rights reserved Schmandt et al. and/or North-Holland

 
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Schmandt, Chris, Ackerman, Mark S. and Hindus, Debby (1990): Augmenting a Window System with Speech Input. In IEEE Computer, 23 (8) pp. 50-56.

 
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