Publication statistics

Pub. period:2007-2012
Pub. count:6
Number of co-authors:25



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Otmar Hilliges:5
Shahram Izadi:4
Patrick Olivier:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

David Kim's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Shahram Izadi:50
Andreas Butz:48
Patrick Olivier:39
 
 
 

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David Kim

 

Publications by David Kim (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Kim, David, Hilliges, Otmar, Izadi, Shahram, Butler, Alex D., Chen, Jiawen, Oikonomidis, Iason and Olivier, Patrick (2012): Digits: freehand 3D interactions anywhere using a wrist-worn gloveless sensor. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 167-176. Available online

Digits is a wrist-worn sensor that recovers the full 3D pose of the user's hand. This enables a variety of freehand interactions on the move. The system targets mobile settings, and is specifically designed to be low-power and easily reproducible using only off-the-shelf hardware. The electronics are self-contained on the user's wrist, but optically image the entirety of the user's hand. This data is processed using a new pipeline that robustly samples key parts of the hand, such as the tips and lower regions of each finger. These sparse samples are fed into new kinematic models that leverage the biomechanical constraints of the hand to recover the 3D pose of the user's hand. The proposed system works without the need for full instrumentation of the hand (for example using data gloves), additional sensors in the environment, or depth cameras which are currently prohibitive for mobile scenarios due to power and form-factor considerations. We demonstrate the utility of Digits for a variety of application scenarios, including 3D spatial interaction with mobile devices, eyes-free interaction on-the-move, and gaming. We conclude with a quantitative and qualitative evaluation of our system, and discussion of strengths, limitations and future work.

© All rights reserved Kim et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Izadi, Shahram, Kim, David, Hilliges, Otmar, Molyneaux, David, Newcombe, Richard, Kohli, Pushmeet, Shotton, Jamie, Hodges, Steve, Freeman, Dustin, Davison, Andrew and Fitzgibbon, Andrew (2011): KinectFusion: real-time 3D reconstruction and interaction using a moving depth camera. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 559-568. Available online

KinectFusion enables a user holding and moving a standard Kinect camera to rapidly create detailed 3D reconstructions of an indoor scene. Only the depth data from Kinect is used to track the 3D pose of the sensor and reconstruct, geometrically precise, 3D models of the physical scene in real-time. The capabilities of KinectFusion, as well as the novel GPU-based pipeline are described in full. Uses of the core system for low-cost handheld scanning, and geometry-aware augmented reality and physics-based interactions are shown. Novel extensions to the core GPU pipeline demonstrate object segmentation and user interaction directly in front of the sensor, without degrading camera tracking or reconstruction. These extensions are used to enable real-time multi-touch interactions anywhere, allowing any planar or non-planar reconstructed physical surface to be appropriated for touch.

© All rights reserved Izadi et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Butler, Alex, Hilliges, Otmar, Izadi, Shahram, Hodges, Steve, Molyneaux, David, Kim, David and Kong, Danny (2011): Vermeer: direct interaction with a 360° viewable 3D display. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 569-576. Available online

We present Vermeer, a novel interactive 360 viewable 3D display. Like prior systems in this area, Vermeer provides viewpoint-corrected, stereoscopic 3D graphics to simultaneous users, 360 around the display, without the need for eyewear or other user instrumentation. Our goal is to over-come an issue inherent in these prior systems which -- typically due to moving parts -- restrict interactions to outside the display volume. Our system leverages a known optical illusion to demonstrate, for the first time, how users can reach into and directly touch 3D objects inside the display volume. Vermeer is intended to be a new enabling technology for interaction, and we therefore describe our hardware implementation in full, focusing on the challenges of combining this optical configuration with an existing approach for creating a 360 viewable 3D display. Initially we demonstrate direct involume interaction by sensing user input with a Kinect camera placed above the display. However, by exploiting the properties of the optical configuration, we also demonstrate novel prototypes for fully integrated input sensing alongside simultaneous display. We conclude by discussing limitations, implications for interaction, and ideas for future work.

© All rights reserved Butler et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Kim, David, Dunphy, Paul, Briggs, Pam, Hook, Jonathan, Nicholson, John, Nicholson, James and Olivier, Patrick (2010): Multi-touch authentication on tabletops. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1093-1102. Available online

The introduction of tabletop interfaces has given rise to the need for the development of secure and usable authentication techniques that are appropriate for the co-located collaborative settings for which they have been designed. Most commonly, user authentication is based on something you know, but this is a particular problem for tabletop interfaces, as they are particularly vulnerable to shoulder surfing given their remit to foster co-located collaboration. In other words, tabletop users would typically authenticate in full view of a number of observers. In this paper, we introduce and evaluate a number of novel tabletop authentication schemes that exploit the features of multi-touch interaction in order to inhibit shoulder surfing. In our pilot work with users, and in our formal user-evaluation, one authentication scheme -- Pressure-Grid -- stood out, significantly enhancing shoulder surfing resistance when participants used it to enter both PINs and graphical passwords.

© All rights reserved Kim et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Hilliges, Otmar, Kim, David and Izadi, Shahram (2008): Creating malleable interactive surfaces using liquid displacement sensing. In: Third IEEE International Workshop on Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces Tabletop 2008 October 1-3, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 157-160. Available online

2007
 
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Hilliges, Otmar, Terrenghi, Lucia, Boring, Sebastian, Kim, David, Richter, Hendrik and Butz, Andreas (2007): Designing for collaborative creative problem solving. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2007, Washington DC, USA. pp. 137-146. Available online

Collaborative creativity is traditionally supported by formal techniques, such as brainstorming. These techniques improve the idea-generation process by creating group synergies, but also suffer from a number of negative effects. Current electronic tools to support collaborative creativity overcome some of these problems, but introduce new ones, by either losing the benefits of face-to-face communication or the immediacy of simultaneous contribution. Using an interactive environment as a test bed, we are investigating how collaborative creativity can be supported electronically while maintaining face-to-face communication. What are the design-factors influencing such a system? We have designed a brainstorming application that uses an interactive table and a large wall display, and compared the results of using it to traditional paper-based brainstorming in a user study with 30 participants. From the considerations that went into the design and the observations during the study we derive a number of design guidelines for collaborative systems in interactive environments.

© All rights reserved Hilliges et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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