Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2011
Pub. count:9
Number of co-authors:28



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Gillian R. Hayes:4
Al Mamunur Rashid:2
David F. Redmiles:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

David H. Nguyen's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Paul Dourish:96
Elizabeth D. Mynat..:71
Gillian R. Hayes:39
 
 
 

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David H. Nguyen

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Publications by David H. Nguyen (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Nguyen, David H., Bedford, Aurora, Bretana, Alexander Gerard and Hayes, Gillian R. (2011): Situating the concern for information privacy through an empirical study of responses to video recording. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3207-3216.

In this paper, we present the results of an empirical study of perceptions towards pervasive video recording. We describe a commonly used model for understanding information privacy, the Concern for Information Privacy (CFIP) model, and present the ways that this model and its associated questionnaire can shed light on information privacy concerns about pervasive and ubiquitous computing technologies. Specifically, the CFIP model encourages analysis of data across four facets of experience: the collection of personal data, the risk of improper access, the potential for unauthorized secondary use, and the challenge of preventing or correcting errors in the data. We further identify areas not well handled by this model of information privacy and suggest avenues for future work, including research on how and when to notify people about recording technologies, awareness of data provenance and leakage, and understanding of and access to the data assemblage being created about individuals.

© All rights reserved Nguyen et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Hirano, Sen H., Yeganyan, Michael T., Marcu, Gabriela, Nguyen, David H., Boyd, Lou Anne and Hayes, Gillian R. (2010): vSked: evaluation of a system to support classroom activities for children with autism. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1633-1642.

Visual schedules -- the use of symbols to represent a series of activities or steps -- have been successfully used by caregivers to help children with autism to understand, structure, and predict activities in their daily lives. Building from in-depth fieldwork and participatory design sessions, we developed vSked, an interactive and collaborative visual scheduling system designed for elementary school classrooms. We evaluated vSked in situ in one autism-specific classroom over three weeks. In this paper, we present the design principles, technical solution, and results from this successful deployment. Use of vSked resulted in reductions in staff effort required to use visual supports. vSked also resulted in improvements in the perceived quality and quantity of communication and social interactions in the classroom.

© All rights reserved Hirano et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Shih, Patrick C., Nguyen, David H., Hirano, Sen H., Redmiles, David F. and Hayes, Gillian R. (2009): GroupMind: supporting idea generation through a collaborative mind-mapping tool. In: GROUP09 - International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2009. pp. 139-148.

Collaborative brainstorming can be a challenging but important part of creative group problem solving. Mind-mapping has the potential to enhance the brainstorming process but has its own challenges when used in a group. We introduce GroupMind, a collaborative mind-mapping tool that addresses these challenges and opens new opportunities for creative teamwork, including brainstorming. We present a semi-controlled evaluation of GroupMind and its impact on teamwork, problem solving and collaboration for brainstorming activities. GroupMind performs better than using a traditional whiteboard in both interaction group and nominal group settings for the task involving memory recall. The hierarchical mind-map structure also imposes important framing effects on group dynamics and idea organization during the brainstorming process. We also present design ideas to assist in the development of future tools to support creative problem solving in groups.

© All rights reserved Shih et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Nguyen, David H., Kobsa, Alfred and Hayes, Gillian R. (2008): An empirical investigation of concerns of everyday tracking and recording technologies. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 182-191.

2007
 
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McDonald, David W., McCarthy, Joseph F., Soroczak, Suzanne, Nguyen, David H. and Rashid, Al Mamunur (2007): Proactive displays: Supporting awareness in fluid social environments. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 14 (4) p. 16.

Academic conferences provide a social space for people to present their work and interact with one another. However, opportunities for interaction are unevenly distributed among the attendees. We seek to extend the opportunities for interaction among attendees by using technology to enable them to reveal information about their background and interests in different settings. We evaluate a suite of applications that augment three physical social spaces at an academic conference. The applications were designed to augment formal conference paper sessions and informal breaks. A mixture of qualitative observation and survey response data are used to frame the impacts from both individual and group perspectives. Respondents reported on their interactions and serendipitous findings of shared interests with other attendees. However, some respondents also identify distracting aspects of the augmentation. Our discussion relates these results to existing theory of group behavior in public places and how these social space augmentations relate to awareness as well as the problem of shared interaction models.

© All rights reserved McDonald et al. and/or ACM Press

2006
 
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Rode, Jennifer Ann, Johansson, Carolina, DiGioia, Paul, Filho, Roberto Silva, Nies, Kari, Nguyen, David H., Ren, Jie, Dourish, Paul and Redmiles, David F. (2006): Seeing further: extending visualization as a basis for usable security. In: Proceedings of the 2006 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2006. pp. 145-155.

The focus of our approach to the usability considerations of privacy and security has been on providing people with information they can use to understand the implications of their interactions with a system, as well as, to assess whether or not a system is secure enough for their immediate needs. To this end, we have been exploring two design principles for secure interaction: visualizing system activity and integrating configuration and action. Here we discuss the results of a user study designed as a broad formative examination of the successes and failures of an initial prototype based around these principles. Our response to the results of this study has been twofold. First, we have fixed a number of implementation and usability problems. Second, we have extended our visualizations to incorporate new considerations regarding the temporal and structural organization of interactions.

© All rights reserved Rode et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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McCarthy, Joseph F., McDonald, David W., Soroczak, Suzanne, Nguyen, David H. and Rashid, Al Mamunur (2004): Augmenting the social space of an academic conference. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 39-48.

Academic conferences provide a social space for people to present their work, learn about others' work, and interact informally with one another. However, opportunities for interaction are unevenly distributed among the attendees. We seek to extend these opportunities by allowing attendees to easily reveal something about their background and interests in different settings through the use of proactive displays: computer displays coupled with sensors that can sense and respond to the people nearby. We designed, implemented and deployed a suite of proactive display applications at a recent academic conference: AutoSpeakerID augmented formal conference paper sessions; Ticket2Talk augmented informal coffee breaks. A mixture of qualitative observation and survey response data are used to frame the impacts of these applications from both individual and group perspectives, highlighting the creation of new opportunities for both interaction and distraction. We end with a discussion of how these social space augmentations relate to the concepts of focus and nimbus as well as the problem of shared interaction models.

© All rights reserved McCarthy et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Vigas, Fernanda B., boyd, danah, Nguyen, David H., Potter, Jeffrey and Donath, Judith S. (2004): Digital Artifacts for Remembering and Storytelling: PostHistory and Social Network Fragments. In: HICSS 2004 2004. .

2002
 
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Tullio, Joe, Goecks, Jeremy, Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Nguyen, David H. (2002): Augmenting shared personal calendars. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (ed.) Proceedings of the 15th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 27-30, 2002, Paris, France. pp. 11-20.

In this paper, we describe Augur, a groupware calendar system to support personal calendaring practices, informal workplace communication, and the socio-technical evolution of the calendar system within a workgroup. Successful design and deployment of groupware calendar systems have been shown to depend on several converging, interacting perspectives. We describe calendar-based work practices as viewed from these perspectives, and present the Augur system in support of them. Augur allows users to retain the flexibility of personal calendars by anticipating and compensating for inaccurate calendar entries and idiosyncratic event names. We employ predictive user models of event attendance, intelligent processing of calendar text, and discovery of shared events to drive novel calendar visualizations that facilitate interpersonal communication. In addition, we visualize calendar access to support privacy management and long-term evolution of the calendar system.

© All rights reserved Tullio et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Changes to this page (author)

05 Jul 2011: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Modified
13 Jun 2009: Modified
02 Jun 2009: Modified
30 May 2009: Modified
12 May 2008: Modified
12 May 2008: Modified
22 Jun 2007: Modified
22 Jun 2007: Modified
28 Apr 2003: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/david_h__nguyen.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2002-2011
Pub. count:9
Number of co-authors:28



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Gillian R. Hayes:4
Al Mamunur Rashid:2
David F. Redmiles:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

David H. Nguyen's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Paul Dourish:96
Elizabeth D. Mynat..:71
Gillian R. Hayes:39
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Design Thinking: The Beginner's Guide
Starts tomorrow LAST CALL!
go to course
The Psychology of Online Sales: The Beginner's Guide
Starts the day after tomorrow !
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading