Publication statistics

Pub. period:1984-2012
Pub. count:46
Number of co-authors:55



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Oli Mival:4
Yvonne Rogers:4
Jennifer J. Preece:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

David Benyon's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Alistair G. Sutcli..:148
Yvonne Rogers:99
T. R. G. Green:69
 
 
 

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David Benyon

BA, MSc, PhD

Picture of David Benyon.
Has also published under the name of:
"D. Benyon" and "D. R. Benyon"

Personal Homepage:
dcs.napier.ac.uk/~dbenyon

Current place of employment:
Edinburgh Napier University

Professor of Human-Computer Systems. Author of Designing Interactive Systems 2nd edition. Addison-Wesley. 2010

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Publications by David Benyon (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Benyon, David, Mival, Oli and Ayan, Serkan (2012): Designing blended spaces. In: Proceedings of the HCI12 Conference on People and Computers XXVI 2012. pp. 398-403.

We present an approach to the design of mixed reality spaces that aims to create a more harmonized and unified user experience. We refer to these as blended spaces. Blended spaces draw upon a description of physical and digital spaces in terms of the ontology, topology, volatility and agency. By describing physical and digital spaces in these terms we are able to use the process and design principles of conceptual blending to arrive at a design that maximizes the relationships between the spaces. It also guides the development of the touch points between the physical and digital spaces. We discuss the user experience in blended spaces and briefly allude to the significant philosophical implications that blended spaces of the future will have to deal with.

© All rights reserved Benyon et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Riley, Chris, Benyon, David, Johnson, Graham I. and Buckner, Kathy (2010): Security in context: investigating the impact of context on attitudes towards biometric technology. In: Proceedings of the HCI10 Conference on People and Computers XXIV 2010. pp. 108-116.

Biometric technologies are increasingly being used in a diverse range of contexts, from immigration control, to banking and personal computing. However, there has been little research that has investigated how biometrics are perceived across these different environments. This paper describes a qualitative investigation of the effect of context on attitudes towards biometric technology. Data collection was carried out in-situ in a train station, an airport and a retail environment. A categorisation of participants' attitudes towards biometrics is presented based on the data collected. There was little evidence for the perception of biometrics varying across the different locations, though security was found to be a more complex, context dependant notion that expected. The results are discussed with reference to notions of context and the acceptability of biometrics for future applications.

© All rights reserved Riley et al. and/or BCS

 
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Bradley, Jay, Benyon, David, Mival, Oli and Webb, Nick (2010): Wizard of Oz experiments and companion dialogues. In: Proceedings of the HCI10 Conference on People and Computers XXIV 2010. pp. 117-123.

Novel speech systems such as the conversational agents being developed by the Companions Project (www.companions-project.org) can be simulated using the Wizard of Oz methodology. In this approach technologies that are not yet ready for testing by people are replaced by a human, both for prototyping and collecting additional dialogue data. In the case of Companions we want to observe what it would be like for people interact with a fully functional embodied conversational agent (ECA) and to collect samples of typical dialogue in order to explore, evaluate and model dialogue strategies. One controversial aspect of the Wizard of Oz approach is whether people should be aware that they are interacting with a simulation or whether they should be "fooled" into thinking they are interacting with a real system. Clearly there are ethical issues involved in fooling people, but some argue that unless the participant believes the simulation to be real, the results of any experimentation will not be applicable to the real situation. Over the course of several previous Wizard of Oz experiments our observations suggest that the dialogues produced do not significantly differ whether the participants know that the technology is faked or not. This hypothesis was investigated by collecting dialogues from two groups of participants. One group of participants believed that the Wizard of Oz speech system was in fact a fully computerised prototype and the other group knew that they would be talking through the interface to a hidden person (the wizard). The dialogues were analysed for differences attributable to the participants' beliefs about the system. This analysis was undertaken by an independent "blind" reviewer, a dialogue expert who attempted to allocate participants to one group or the other. His guess was wrong for four out of the six participants. Thus it appears that whether people believe they are interacting with a real system or not does not effect the dialogues and other factors, for example the personality of the person engaged in a dialogue with an ECA, are more important.

© All rights reserved Bradley et al. and/or BCS

 
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Benyon, David (2010): Designing Interactive Systems: A Comprehensive Guide to HCI and Interaction Design (2nd Edition). Pearson Education Canada

Designing Interactive Systems is the most up-to-date and authoritative textbook in the areas of Human–Computer Interaction (HCI), usability, consumer experience and Interaction Design. David Benyon has taken the well-received first edition and remodelled it for the next era of interactive devices and applications.  

© All rights reserved Benyon and/or Pearson Education Canada

2009
 
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Bradley, Jay, Mival, Oli and Benyon, David (2009): Wizard of Oz experiments for companions. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 313-317.

Wizard of Oz experiments allow designers and developers to see the reactions of people as they interact with to-be-developed technologies. At the Centre for Interaction Design at Edinburgh Napier University we are developing a Wizard of Oz system to inform and further the design and development of Companion based technologies. Companions are intelligent, persistent, personalised, multimodal, natural language interfaces to the Internet and resources such as photo or music collections. They have the potential of turning our current human-machine interactions into human-machine relationships. In particular, a Companion prototype for reminiscing about a photo collection, called PhotoPal, is being used in our experiments. Several Wizard of Oz experiments have been run to assess people's reactions and thoughts about using a Companion interface. The feedback from these experiments has informed both the design direction and choice of development technologies going forward. The Wizard of Oz system has also been put to use in a classroom of young pupils and to aid adults make more productive use of the Internet for learning. Further experiments to investigate the appropriateness of Companion dialogue are planned.

© All rights reserved Bradley et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Benyon, David and Mival, Oli (2008): Landscaping personification technologies: from interactions to relationships. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 3657-3662.

Personification technologies are technologies that encourage people to anthropomorphize. These technologies try to get people to form relationships with them rather than simply interact with them. They may do this through having behaviours that encourage people to attribute personality or emotion to them. They may be persuasive technologies in the sense of Fogg that aim to get people to do things they would rather not do. They may promote trust. The convergence of a number of technologies is making personification technologies possible. Speech as an interaction is finally becoming robust and useable and is very influential in people attributing intelligence to devices and systems. Human language technologies allow devices to understand, or appear to understand, conversation. Interactions are becoming more natural and engaging. Avatars appear more congenial and coordinated. Building on the experience of a previous project, and drawing on the experience of a four year multi-disciplinary project, called Companions, the authors are keen to build community relationships around the notion of personification technologies. This includes the design, engineering, research (including ethics and social issues) and usability communities.

© All rights reserved Benyon and Mival and/or ACM Press

 
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Baillie, Lynne and Benyon, David (2008): Place and Technology in the Home. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 17 (2) pp. 227-256.

The home is a complex environment, designed for general use but shaped by individual needs and desires. It is a place often shared by several people with different demands and requirements. It is a place embedded with technologies utilised at various times by people in diverse ways. Until recently most home technologies have been primarily functional; aimed at easing domestic chores such as cooking, washing and cleaning. In the last few years information and communication technologies have added to the technological complexity of the home. Entertainment technologies have become increasingly dominant, as the simple TV has given way to video, DVD and satellite or cable services. Technologies converge and diverge to create new hybrid experiences; a trend which we see continuing. Moreover in the future ubiquitous and ambient computing devices and functions will become hidden and communications between devices will become more complex. It is against this background that we undertook a number of studies into the place of technologies and technology use in the home. We studied the placement and use of existing technologies in five homes in Scotland using a novel, multi-part, naturalistic methodology. Transcripts from the studies were analysed using a grounded theory approach in an attempt to draw out key, recurring concepts concerning technology use at home. Eight concepts -- place, learning, utility, interaction, control, cost, lifecycle and privacy -- emerged from this analysis. Additionally, four types of space were identified in homes; communication, work, leisure (private) and leisure (public). In this paper we focus on these four spaces and how they fit in with previous work on places and spaces in the home. We present a contextually grounded method of investigation of home technologies, the technology tour, and show how the four spaces in the home can be understood and represented as maps of the home layout that are often different for different members of the household. This understanding of place can be set alongside an understanding of technology where the themes of utility, interaction, cost and lifecycle are most important. General design issues that cross place and technology in the home are discussed in the final section of the paper. These can be used to sensitise designers of both artefacts and physical spaces to the needs of people and their use of technologies at home.

© All rights reserved Baillie and Benyon and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

 
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Baillie, Lynne and Benyon, David (2008): Place and Technology in the Home. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 17 (2) pp. 227-256.

The home is a complex environment, designed for general use but shaped by individual needs and desires. It is a place often shared by several people with different demands and requirements. It is a place embedded with technologies utilised at various times by people in diverse ways. Until recently most home technologies have been primarily functional; aimed at easing domestic chores such as cooking, washing and cleaning. In the last few years information and communication technologies have added to the technological complexity of the home. Entertainment technologies have become increasingly dominant, as the simple TV has given way to video, DVD and satellite or cable services. Technologies converge and diverge to create new hybrid experiences; a trend which we see continuing. Moreover in the future ubiquitous and ambient computing devices and functions will become hidden and communications between devices will become more complex. It is against this background that we undertook a number of studies into the place of technologies and technology use in the home. We studied the placement and use of existing technologies in five homes in Scotland using a novel, multi-part, naturalistic methodology. Transcripts from the studies were analysed using a grounded theory approach in an attempt to draw out key, recurring concepts concerning technology use at home. Eight concepts -- place, learning, utility, interaction, control, cost, lifecycle and privacy -- emerged from this analysis. Additionally, four types of space were identified in homes; communication, work, leisure (private) and leisure (public). In this paper we focus on these four spaces and how they fit in with previous work on places and spaces in the home. We present a contextually grounded method of investigation of home technologies, the technology tour, and show how the four spaces in the home can be understood and represented as maps of the home layout that are often different for different members of the household. This understanding of place can be set alongside an understanding of technology where the themes of utility, interaction, cost and lifecycle are most important. General design issues that cross place and technology in the home are discussed in the final section of the paper. These can be used to sensitise designers of both artefacts and physical spaces to the needs of people and their use of technologies at home.

© All rights reserved Baillie and Benyon and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

2007
 
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Jones, Trevor D., Lawson, Shaun W., Benyon, David and Armitage, Alistair (2007): Comparison of Human and Machine Recognition of Everyday Human Actions. In: Duffy, Vincent G. (ed.) ICDHM 2007 - First International Conference on Digital Human Modeling July 22-27, 2007, Beijing, China. pp. 120-129.

2006
 
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Benyon, David, Smyth, Michael, O'Neill, Shaleph, McCall, Rod and Carroll, Fiona (2006): The Place Probe: Exploring a Sense of Place in Real and Virtual Environments. In Presence: Teleoperators and Virtual Environments, 15 (6) pp. 668-687.

 
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Benyon, David (2006): Navigating Information Space: Web site design and lessons from the built environment. In Psychnology, 4 (1) pp. 7-24.

The Web is the archetypal information space but even on a well designed site it can be difficult to find all the information you need. It is impossible to design a site so that all the information needs of all the users of the site are satisfied on a single screen. Accordingly people have to pick up information from a variety of sources; they move through the information space to gather all the information that is required. This is generally called 'navigation'. Navigation is concerned with finding out about, and moving through, an environment. Of course there is a long history of designing for navigation in physical spaces. Architects, urban planners, geographers and others have studied navigation and learnt how to design physical spaces to help people find the place they are looking for, to enjoy exploration for its own sake, or to help find their way through a space to get somewhere else. The question arises as to whether we can leverage any of this knowledge for the design of information spaces such as Web sites. In this paper we review a variety of views on navigation of physical space to see how this knowledge might transfer to the design of information spaces. The example of using Gordon Cullen's serial vision theory to design a Web site map is used to show the transfer of knowledge from the design of urban space to the design of digital space. Guidelines for good Web site design and examples of how social navigation can be used within Web sites are provided.

© All rights reserved Benyon and/or Psychnology.Org

2005
 
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McCall, Rod, O'Neill, Shaleph, Carroll, Fiona, Benyon, David and Smyth, Michael (2005): Responsive Environments, Place and Presence. In Psychnology, 3 (1) pp. 35-73.

This paper examines the effect that changing arena (i.e. an immersive CAVE or head mounted display) and adding an augmented barrier has on the sense of place and presence in two photo-realistic virtual environments. Twenty eight subjects (17 male, 11 female) mainly undergraduate students or staff took part. The paper summarises two experiments that used a range of data capture methods including the place probe, semantic differentials, distance estimates and the MEC Questionnaire. The results indicate that in non-interactive photo-realistic environments the choice of arena has an impact on the perceived ability to undertake actions, and hence sense of place and presence; with the CAVE providing a lower sense of spatial presence for certain aspects than the HMD.

© All rights reserved McCall et al. and/or Psychnology.Org

 
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Benyon, David, Turner, Phil and Turner, Susan (2005): Designing interactive systems : people, activities, contexts, technologies. Addison-Wesley

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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McEwan, Tom, Gulliksen, Jan and Benyon, David (eds.) (2005): People and Computers XIX - The Bigger Picture. London, UK, Springer-Verlag

This volume contains the full papers presented at HCI2005, at Napier University Edinburgh, September 2005

© All rights reserved McEwan et al. and/or Springer-Verlag

2004
 
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Sands, Jamie, Lawson, Shaun W. and Benyon, David (2004): Do we Need Stereoscopic Displays for 3D Augmented Reality Target Selection Tasks?. In: IV 2004 - 8th International Conference on Information Visualisation 14-16 July, 2004, London, UK. pp. 633-638.

 
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Benyon, David, Moody, Paul, Gruen, Dan and McAra-McWilliam, Irene (eds.) Proceedings of the Conference on Designing Interactive Systems Processes, Practices, Methods, and Techniques, Cambridge, MA, USA, August 1-4, 2004 2004.

2003
 
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Benyon, David and Wilmes, B. (2003): The Application of Urban Design Principles to Navigation of Information Spaces. In: Proceedings of the HCI03 Conference on People and Computers XVII 2003. pp. 105-126.

2002
 
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Benyon, David and Macaulay, Catriona (2002): Scenarios and the HCI-SE design problem. In Interacting with Computers, 14 (4) pp. 397-405.

Diaper's critical review of Carroll's book 'Making Use' raises a number of interesting issues about how to set about the design of interactive systems. In particular Diaper poses an issue that has long dogged the area of Human-Computer Interaction and Software Engineering (HCI-SE), namely how to deal with the formality required by the SE side and the sensitivity to context required by the HCI side. In this paper, we report on the experience of using scenario-based design and reflect on the effectiveness of the approach. This work fits into a broader context concerned with understanding exactly what the HCI-SE design problem is and now it might be best conceptualised.

© All rights reserved Benyon and Macaulay and/or Elsevier Science

 Cited in the following chapter:

Requirements Engineering: [/encyclopedia/requirements_engineering.html]


 
2000
 
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Macaulay, Catriona, Benyon, David and Crerar, Alison (2000): Ethnography, Theory and Systems Design: From Intuition to Insight. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 53 (1) pp. 35-60.

The idea for this paper came from a debate at the 1998 ISCRAT conference in Denmark on cultural-historical activity theory (CHAT). A leading activist in the movement to bring CHAT into systems design, Bonnie Nardi, asked the question; would design not benefit more from training better ethnographers than from burdening them with such a complex set of theoretical concepts and debates as CHAT? This paper seeks to answer that question on the basis of our experiences applying CHAT concepts in a long-term design ethnography at a UK newspaper. It examines the history of the often controversial triadic relationship between ethnography, theory and systems design and argues that the CHAT framework provided us with the opportunity to move from ethnographic intuition to design insight, and that therefore the answer to Nardi's question is no-simply training good ethnographers is unlikely to be enough for a number of reasons (not least of which is the problem of how inexperienced fieldworkers become design ethnographers). The explicit use of theoretical frameworks, at least those such as CHAT which are particularly suited to design issues, discourages the tendency for ethnographers to see themselves as "proxy users" by encouraging greater reflexivity about the researcher's role in constructing the object of study. At a more pragmatic level, it helps the fieldworker navigate the apparently never-ending mass of "potentially interesting material" any field experience throws up.

© All rights reserved Macaulay et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Graham, Martin, Kennedy, Jessie and Benyon, David (2000): Towards a Methodology for Developing Visualizations. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 53 (5) pp. 789-807.

This paper presents a case study of the development of a visualization to represent and explore the relationships between multiple hierarchical structures, specifically botanical taxonomies. The case study outlines the visualization's development from initial meetings with taxonomists, through the early visual sketches of their activities, and through to the prototype as it exists now after two rounds of usability testing. Qualitative user feedback was elicited from taxonomists who used the system, using standard techniques, taken from traditional usability methodologies such as direct observation, concurrent verbal protocols, video recording and software logs. Some difficulties and differences in the testing and stages of development arising from the information visualization (IV) approach to the graphical display, as contrasted to a more standard graphical user interface (GUI), are noted and solutions proposed.

© All rights reserved Graham et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Benyon, David and Murray, Dianne M. (2000): Special Issue on Intelligent Interface Technology: Editor's Introduction. In Interacting with Computers, 12 (4) pp. 315-322.

 
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Draper, Stephen W., Benyon, David, Crerar, Alison, Gray, Philip D., Kilgour, Alistair C., Newman, J. C. and Mayes, J. Terry (2000): Research note. Remote collaborative tutorial teaching in MANTCHI. In J. Comp. Assisted Learning, 16 (4) pp. 376-377.

1999
 
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Benyon, David, Bental, Diana and Green, T. R. G. (1999): Conceptual Modeling for User Interface Development. Springer-Verlag

 
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Benyon, David and Imaz, Manuel (1999): Metaphors and Models: Conceptual Foundations of Representations in Interactive Systems Development. In Human-Computer Interaction, 14 (1) pp. 159-189.

When system developers design a computer system (or other information artifact), they must inevitably make judgments as to how to abstract the worksystem and how to represent this abstraction in their designs. In the past, such abstractions have been based either on a traditional philosophy of cognition or cognitive psychology or on intuitive, spontaneous philosophies. A number of recent developments in distributed cognition (Hutchins, 1995), activity theory (Nardi, 1996), and experientialism (Lakoff, 1987) have raised questions about the legitimacy of such philosophies. In this article, we discuss from where the abstractions come that designers employ and how such abstractions are related to the concepts that the users of these systems have. In particular, we use the theory of experientialism or experiential cognition as the foundation for our analysis. Experientialism (Lakoff, 1987) has previously only been applied to human-computer interaction (HCI) design in a quite limited way, yet it deals specifically with issues concerned with categorization and concept formation. We show how the concept of metaphor, derived from experientialism, can be used to understand the strengths and weaknesses of alternative representations in HCI design, how it can highlight changes in the paradigm underlying representations, and how it can be used to consider new approaches to HCI design. We also discuss the role that "mental spaces" have in forming new concepts and designs.

© All rights reserved Benyon and Imaz and/or Taylor and Francis

1998
 
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Sutcliffe, Alistair G. and Benyon, David (1998): Guest Editors' Introduction. In Autom. Softw. Eng., 5 (4) pp. 385-387.

1997
 
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Benyon, David, Stone, D. and Woodroffe, Mark (1997): Experience with Developing Multimedia Courseware for the World Wide Web: The Need for Better Tools and Clear Pedagogy. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 47 (1) pp. 197-218.

The phenomenal growth of the Internet over the last few years, coupled with the development of various multimedia applications which exploit the Internet presents exciting opportunities for educators. In the context of distance education, the World Wide Web provides a unique challenge as a new delivery mechanism for course material allowing students to take a course (potentially) from anywhere in the world. In this paper, we describe our approach to the development of an Internet-based course designed for distance education. Using this experience, we provide general observations on the opportunities and constraints which the web provides and on the pedagogic issues which arise when using this delivery mechanism. We have found that the process of developing web-based courses is one area which requires careful consideration as technologies and tools for both the authoring and the delivery of courses are evolving so rapidly. We have also found that current tools are severely lacking in a number of important respects -- particularly with respect to the design of pedagogically sound courseware.

© All rights reserved Benyon et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Benyon, David (1997): Communication and Shared Knowledge in Human-Computer Systems. In: Smith, Michael J., Salvendy, Gavriel and Koubek, Richard J. (eds.) HCI International 1997 - Proceedings of the Seventh International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction - Volume 2 August 24-29, 1997, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 43-46.

1996
 
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Green, T. R. G. and Benyon, David (1996): The Skull Beneath the Skin: Entity-Relationship Models of Information Artifacts. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 44 (6) pp. 801-828.

Data modelling reveals the internal structure of an information system, abstracting away from details of the physical representation. We show that entity-relationship modelling, a well-tried example of a data-modelling technique, can be applied to both interactive and noninteractive information artifacts in the domain of HCI. By extending the conventional ER notation slightly (to give ERMIA, Entity-Relationship Modelling for Information Artifacts) it can be used to describe differences between different representations of the same information, differences between user's conceptual models of the same device, and the structure and update requirements of distributed information in a worksystem. It also yields symbolic-level estimates of Card, Pirolli and Mackinlay's index of "cost-of-knowledge" in an information structure, plus a novel index, the "cost-of-update"; these symbolic estimates offer a useful complement to the highly detailed analyses of time costs obtainable from GOMS-like models. We conclude that, as a cheap, coarse-grained, and easy-to-learn modelling technique, ERMIA usefully fills a gap in the range of available HCI analysis techniques.

© All rights reserved Green and Benyon and/or Academic Press

 
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Benyon, David and Palanque, Philippe A. (1996): Critical Issues in User Interface Systems Engineering. Springer-Verlag

 
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Sutcliffe, Alistair G., Assche, Frans van and Benyon, David (eds.) (1996): Domain Knowledge for Interactive System Design. Kluwer Academic Publishers

1995
 
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Benyon, David (1995): Navigating Information Space. In: Stephanidis, Constantine (ed.) Proceedings of the 1st ERCIM Workshop on User Interfaces for All October 30-31, 1995, Heraklion, Crete, Greece. p. 16.

The issue of how users can navigate their way through large information spaces is one that is crucial to the ever expanding and interlinking of computer systems. There are many ways of dealing with the issue of navigation one of which is to provide different dialogue styles to suit individual capabilities. The performance of users was compared on a menu style interface to a database system, which minimised navigation and constrained the dialogue, and a command style interface, which allowed an open and flexible dialogue. The results showed that some users did perform better on the interface which minimised navigational issues, and some better on the more open interface; and that users' performance related to their levels of spatial ability and experience with using command style interfaces. The menu interface proved suitable for users with both a low spatial ability and low experience of using command style interfaces. The command interface proved suitable for all users with a high spatial ability, whatever their previous experience, and for users with a low spatial ability but high experience of using command style interfaces. The results of this small scale experiment have potentially important ramifications for designers of interfaces to large information spaces.

© All rights reserved Benyon and/or The European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics - ERCIM

1994
 
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Preece, Jennifer J., Rogers, Yvonne, Sharp, Helen and Benyon, David (1994): Human-Computer Interaction. Essex, UK, Addison-Wesley Publishing

 Cited in the following chapter:

Interaction Styles: [/encyclopedia/interaction_styles.html]


 
 
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Preece, Jennifer J., Rogers, Yvonne, Sharp, Helen, Benyon, David, Holland, Simon and Carey, Tom (1994): Human-Computer Interaction. Reading, Mass., Addison-Wesley Publishing

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Benyon, David (1994): Intelligence as Adaptive Behaviour; An Experiment in Computational Neuroethology. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 40 (6) pp. 1071-1073.

 
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Benyon, David and Munro, Alan (1994): Using Agents in Social Navigation. In: Stephanidis, Constantine and Carbonell, Noelle (eds.) Proceedings of the 3rd ERCIM Workshop on User Interfaces for All November 3-4, 1994, Obernai, France. p. 3.

The issue of how users can navigate their way through large information spaces is crucial to the ever expanding and interlinking of computer systems. Computer users live in a world of information spaces. One of the most critical activities which users need to undertake is to retrieve information from such spaces and thus the problem of how to help the user to navigate, explore and identify the objects of interest is critical to the success of the system (Benyon and Hook, 1997). The PERSONA project is a collaborative long-term research project between the Swedish Institute of Computer Science and Napier University. It is funded by the EU's fourth framework programme, task LTR4.4, and is investigating a new approach to navigation based on a personalised and social navigational paradigm. Most information retrieval in the "real" world is accomplished through communication between people. We trust certain individuals to possess the information we are looking for. In addition, we expect them to be able to express the information so that it becomes personalised to our needs, understanding and abilities. Often the information seeking is done through talking to several persons, comparing the advice given, reformulating the original need for information, and only sometimes turning to other information sources such as books or on-line databases. One way in which this project seeks to develop our understanding of human activities in information spaces is by looking at the concept of social navigation.

© All rights reserved Benyon and Munro and/or The European Research Consortium for Informatics and Mathematics - ERCIM

 
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Benyon, David, Kuhme, Thomas and Malinowsi, Uwe (1994): Computer-aided Adaptation of User Interfaces. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 26 (1) pp. 25-27.

 
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Preece, Jennifer J., Rogers, Yvonne, Sharp, Helen, Benyon, David, Holland, Simon and Carey, Tom (1994): Human-Computer Interaction. Reading, Mass., Addison-Wesley Publishing

1993
 
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Benyon, David (1993): "Information Modelling Practical Guidance," by Richard Veryard. In International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 38 (6) pp. 1049-1055.

 
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Benyon, David and Murray, Dianne (1993): Developing Adaptive Systems to Fit Individual Aptitudes. In: Gray, Wayne D., Hefley, William and Murray, Dianne (eds.) International Workshop on Intelligent User Interfaces 1993 January 4-7, 1993, Orlando, Florida, USA. pp. 115-121.

We focus on designing systems which can adapt to individual differences in personality and cognitive style. To do so, we need to identify individual cognitive and personalily characteristics, validate them and discover appropriate design solutions to deal with such differences. These factors are long-term and relatively stable individual aptitudes and therefore are difficult for humans to change. We believe that it is exactly these sort of differences with which adaptive systems should concern themselves. We describe how we have approached identification of these characteristics and describe how they were incorporated in an operational, though functionally quite simple system.

© All rights reserved Benyon and Murray and/or ACM Press

 
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Preece, Jennifer J., Benyon, David, Davies, Gordon, Keller, Laurie and Rogers, Yvonne (eds.) (1993): A Guide to Usability: Human Factors in Computing. Wokingham, England, Addison-Wesley Publishing

1992
 
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Benyon, David (1992): "The Nurnberg Funnel: Designing Minimalist Instruction for Practical Computer Skill,. In International Journal of Man-Machine Studies, 36 (3) pp. 507-510.

 
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Benyon, David (1992): The Role of Task Analysis in Systems Design. In Interacting with Computers, 4 (1) pp. 102-123.

Task analysis and systems analysis are both collections of techniques aimed at the development of interactive computer-based systems. Clearly there must be some relationship between them. However, since the techniques originate from different disciplines, practitioners in one area are not always clear about that has gone before in the other area. The paper addresses this problem. Task analysis clearly has an important role to play in various aspects of systems development. However it may also introduce bad practices which can be avoided if lessons are learnt from the experiences of systems analysis over the last two decades. An understanding of the strengths and weaknesses of systems analysis techniques enables the proper role of task analysis to be understood.

© All rights reserved Benyon and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Benyon, David (1992): Task Analysis and System Design: The Discipline of Data. In Interacting with Computers, 4 (2) pp. 246-259.

1990
 
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Benyon, David, Murray, Dianne M. and Jennings, Frances (1990): An Adaptive System Developer's Tool-Kit. In: Diaper, Dan, Gilmore, David J., Cockton, Gilbert and Shackel, Brian (eds.) INTERACT 90 - 3rd IFIP International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction August 27-31, 1990, Cambridge, UK. pp. 573-577.

Adaptive systems share some characteristics with other knowledge-based systems, but differ in other important respects. In particular, adaptive systems require a comprehensive model of the system users and have to make inferences not just about the domain, but also about the users' knowledge of the domain. This paper describes the design of a User Modelling Shell -- a system designed to meet the needs of adaptive system developers. The paper outlines the architecture of the system and the reasons for the chosen design and illustrates these principles with examples from an application of the system.

© All rights reserved Benyon et al. and/or North-Holland

1987
 
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Benyon, David, Innocent, Peter and Murray, Dianne M. (1987): System Adaptivity and the Modelling of Stereotypes. In: Bullinger, Hans-Jorg and Shackel, Brian (eds.) INTERACT 87 - 2nd IFIP International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction September 1-4, 1987, Stuttgart, Germany. pp. 245-253.

The argument for adaptivity in a system is developed and related to previous theoretical work on adaptive interface design. We attempt to integrate recent research findings with practical experimental trials to provide a new formalism for system adaptivity. The experimental vehicle is a small CBT/tutoring system which incorporates embedded models of individual characteristics and student information in the form of 'stereotypic' attributes and user profiles. We describe the system characteristics and operation, give our experimental results and detail future planned work. We discuss some of the implementation difficulties already encountered and those which we expect to be apparent in future systems.

© All rights reserved Benyon et al. and/or North-Holland

1984
 
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Benyon, David (1984): MONITOR. A Self-Adaptive User Interface. In: Shackel, Brian (ed.) INTERACT 84 - 1st IFIP International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction September 4-7, 1984, London, UK. pp. 335-341.

The design of a human-computer dialogue is widely recognised as being difficult, as it includes principles of graphics and information presentation underpinned by psychological factors such as closure and control over the system. This realisation has prompted the call for adaptive or self-adaptive user interfaces. Such systems need to maintain a model of the user and the dialogue so that the dialogue can be altered as users develop their skills. MONITOR has been designed to provide a self-adaptive user interface. The system is flexible enough to cater for any dialogue, and a prototype system in the area of computer aided learning has been implemented. The prototype is seen as a contribution to the collection of research tools which are needed if a useable system is to be developed. The system is still unsophisticated in much of its operation but the design has proved itself to be a suitable and flexible representation of any problem which can be analysed along the user-task dimensions, and the feasibility of the system has been established.

© All rights reserved Benyon and/or North-Holland

 
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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/david_benyon.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1984-2012
Pub. count:46
Number of co-authors:55



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Oli Mival:4
Yvonne Rogers:4
Jennifer J. Preece:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

David Benyon's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Alistair G. Sutcli..:148
Yvonne Rogers:99
T. R. G. Green:69
 
 
 

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