Publication statistics

Pub. period:2005-2012
Pub. count:13
Number of co-authors:29



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Alan Blackwell:4
Stefan Agamanolis:2
Jennifer G. Sheridan:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Darren Edge's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

James A. Landay:91
Abigail Sellen:81
Alan Blackwell:58
 
 
 
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Darren Edge

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Publications by Darren Edge (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Edge, Darren, Cheng, Kai-Yin, Whitney, Michael, Qian, Yao, Yan, Zhijie and Soong, Frank (2012): Tip tap tones: mobile microtraining of mandarin sounds. In: Proceedings of the 14th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2012. pp. 427-430.

Learning a second language is hard, especially when the learner's brain must be retrained to identify sounds not present in his or her native language. It also requires regular practice, but many learners struggle to find the time and motivation. Our solution is to break down the challenge of mastering a foreign sound system into minute-long episodes of "microtraining" delivered through mobile gaming. We present the example of Tip Tap Tones -- a mobile game with the purpose of helping learners acquire the tonal sound system of Mandarin Chinese. In a 3-week, 12-user study of this system, we found that an average of 71 minutes' gameplay significantly improved tone identification by around 25%, regardless of whether the underlying sounds had been used to train tone perception. Overall, results suggest that mobile microtraining is an efficient, effective, and enjoyable way to master the sounds of Mandarin Chinese, with applications to other languages and domains.

© All rights reserved Edge et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Edge, Darren, Fitchett, Stephen, Whitney, Michael and Landay, James (2012): MemReflex: adaptive flashcards for mobile microlearning. In: Proceedings of the 14th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2012. pp. 431-440.

Flashcard systems typically help students learn facts (e.g., definitions, names, and dates), relying on intense initial memorization with subsequent tests delayed up to days later. This approach does not exploit the short, sparse, and mobile opportunities for microlearning throughout the day, nor does it support learners who need the motivation that comes from successful study sessions. In contrast, our MemReflex system of adaptive flashcards gives fast-feedback by retesting new items in quick succession, dynamically scheduling future tests according to a model of the learner's memory. We evaluate MemReflex across three user studies. In the first two studies, we demonstrate its effectiveness for both audio and text modalities, even while walking and distracted. In the third study of second-language vocabulary learning, we show how MemReflex enhanced learner accuracy, confidence, and perceptions of control and success. Overall, the work suggests new directions for mobile microlearning and "micro activities" in general.

© All rights reserved Edge et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Mueller, Florian 'Floyd', Edge, Darren, Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Agamanolis, Stefan, Bongers, Bert and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2011): Designing sports: a framework for exertion games. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2651-2660.

Exertion games require investing physical effort. The fact that such games can support physical health is tempered by our limited understanding of how to design for engaging exertion experiences. This paper introduces the Exertion Framework as a way to think and talk about Exertion Games, both for their formative design and summative analysis. Our Exertion Framework is based on the ways in which we can conceive of the body investing in game-directed exertion, supported by four perspectives on the body (the Responding Body, Moving Body, Sensing Body and Relating Body) and three perspectives on gaming (rules, play and context). The paper illustrates how this framework was derived from prior systems and theory, and presents a case study of how it has been used to inspire novel exertion interactions.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Edge, Darren, Searle, Elly, Chiu, Kevin, Zhao, Jing and Landay, James A. (2011): MicroMandarin: mobile language learning in context. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 3169-3178.

Learning a new language is hard, but learning to use it confidently in conversations with native speakers is even harder. From our field research with language learners, with support from Cognitive Psychology and Second Language Acquisition, we argue for the value of contextual microlearning in the many breaks spread across different places and throughout the day. We present a mobile application that supports such microlearning by leveraging the location-based service Foursquare to automatically provide contextually relevant content in the world's major cities. In an evaluation of Mandarin Chinese learning, a four-week, 23-user study spanning Beijing and Shanghai compared this contextual system to a system based on word frequency. Study sessions with the contextual version lasted half as long but occurred in twice as many places as sessions with the frequency version, suggesting a complementary relationship between the two approaches.

© All rights reserved Edge et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Cao, Xiang, Sellen, Abigail, Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Kirk, David, Edge, Darren and Ding, Xianghua (2010): Understanding family communication across time zones. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW10 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2010. pp. 155-158.

Nowadays it has become increasingly common for family members to be distributed in different time zones. These time differences pose specific challenges for communication within the family and result in different communication practices to cope with them. To gain an understanding of current challenges and practices, we interviewed people who regularly communicate with immediate family members living in other time zones. We report primary findings from the interviews, and identify design opportunities for improving the experience of cross time zone family communication.

© All rights reserved Cao et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mueller, Florian, Vetere, Frank, Gibbs, Martin R., Edge, Darren, Agamanolis, Stefan and Sheridan, Jennifer G. (2010): Jogging over a distance between Europe and Australia. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 189-198.

Exertion activities, such as jogging, require users to invest intense physical effort and are associated with physical and social health benefits. Despite the benefits, our understanding of exertion activities is limited, especially when it comes to social experiences. In order to begin understanding how to design for technologically augmented social exertion experiences, we present "Jogging over a Distance", a system in which spatialized audio based on heart rate allowed runners as far apart as Europe and Australia to run together. Our analysis revealed how certain aspects of the design facilitated a social experience, and consequently we describe a framework for designing augmented exertion activities. We make recommendations as to how designers could use this framework to aid the development of future social systems that aim to utilize the benefits of exertion.

© All rights reserved Mueller et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Blackwell, Alan and Edge, Darren (2009): Articulating tangible interfaces. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 113-118.

 
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Edge, Darren and Blackwell, Alan (2009): Peripheral tangible interaction by analytic design. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 69-76.

 
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Edge, Darren and Blackwell, Alan (2009): Bimanual tangible interaction with mobile phones. In: Villar, Nicolas, Izadi, Shahram, Fraser, Mike and Benford, Steve (eds.) TEI 2009 - Proceedings of the 3rd International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction February 16-18, 2009, Cambridge, UK. pp. 131-136.

 
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Edge, Darren and Ding, Xianghua (2009): Directed manipulation with respect to focal rings. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 83-92.

In this paper we describe the notion of a focal ring interface: an interface comprising a centrally-located graphical ring that provides a visual focus for interaction with respect to itself and its associated representation (such as a map, media collection, or information hierarchy). Our focal rings provide an opportunity to assign independent effects to the two dimensions of a display surface, creating implicit gestural modes (e.g. navigation versus scaling) that can be dynamically switched between in the context of a single continuous stroke. A focal ring can define the origin of a Polar or Cartesian frame of reference, interpreting touch gestures directed either through and around, or horizontal and vertical to itself. We illustrate the potential for such directed manipulation with respect to focal rings through the design and evaluation of ring-centric interfaces based on a variety of physical metaphors.

© All rights reserved Edge and Ding and/or their publisher

2006
 
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Edge, Darren (2006): Darren Edge. In: VL-HCC 2006 - IEEE Symposium on Visual Languages and Human-Centric Computing 4-8 September, 2006, Brighton, UK. pp. 228-229.

 
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Edge, Darren and Blackwell, Alan (2006): Correlates of the cognitive dimensions for tangible user interface. In J. Vis. Lang. Comput., 17 (4) pp. 366-394.

2005
 
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Blackwell, Alan F., Edge, Darren, Dubuc, L., Rode, Jennifer Ann, Stringer, Mark and Toye, Eleanor F. (2005): Using solid diagrams for tangible interface prototyping. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 4 (4) pp. 74-77.

 
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Changes to this page (author)

23 Nov 2012: Modified
23 Nov 2012: Modified
26 Jul 2011: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/darren_edge.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2005-2012
Pub. count:13
Number of co-authors:29



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Alan Blackwell:4
Stefan Agamanolis:2
Jennifer G. Sheridan:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Darren Edge's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

James A. Landay:91
Abigail Sellen:81
Alan Blackwell:58
 
 
 
Jul 24

There is no reason for any individual to have a computer in his home

-- Ken Olson

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!