Publication statistics

Pub. period:2000-2012
Pub. count:10
Number of co-authors:17



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Blaine A. Price:4
Yvonne Rogers:4
Arosha K. Bandara:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Clara Mancini's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Yvonne Rogers:99
Bashar Nuseibeh:36
Simon Buckingham S..:25
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Emotional Design: How to make products people will love
Starts TODAY LAST CALL!
go to course
UI Design Patterns for Successful Software
87% booked. Starts in 8 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Clara Mancini

Picture of Clara Mancini.
Update pic
Personal Homepage:
http://kmi.open.ac.uk/people/clara

Current place of employment:
Knowledge Media Institute, The Open University, United Kingdom

Clara Mancini is presently research fellow at the Knowledge Media Institute, The Open University, where she works in a highly interdisciplinary environment.

In general, her work is concerned with the understanding of electronic media's linguistic possibilities and their implications for both human communication and computer system design. Her research interests include hypermedia languages; knowledge modelling and discourse representation in hypertext; hypermedia repositories and digital libraries; hypertext discourse and cognitive coherence; interaction between textual and visual codes in electronic media; cognitive processes and hypertext affordances.

In particular, she has been working on the problem of coherence in interactve textual and visual discourse and her main contribution to the research area is the investigation of Cinematic Hypertext as a paradigm for framing the medium and its characteristics. Her work gathers ideas from technology, psycholinguistics, visual design, narratology and film theory, and identifies design principles and guidelines for the development of experimental systems.

Clara graduated in Letters of Arts at Pisa University, studying literature, arts critics and aesthetics, semiotics and cinematic theory. She was awarded the Euro Multimedia Master by the Italian Association of Cinematic Industry and a specialization in Educational Communication by Padova University. She worked in Italy as hypertext designer for the National Centre of Conservation and Study of Scientific Instruments and for Consorzio Pisa Ricerche, before moving to England, where she obtained a Ph.D. in Knowledge Media at the Knowledge Media Instiute.

 

Publications by Clara Mancini (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
Edit | Del

Mancini, Clara, Linden, Janet van der, Bryan, Jon and Stuart, Andrew (2012): Exploring interspecies sensemaking: dog tracking semiotics and multispecies ethnography. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 143-152. Available online

The domestic use of tracking technology with pets is on the rise, yet is under-researched. We investigate how tracking practices reconfigure human-dog relationships changing both humans and dogs. We question the sensemaking mechanisms by which both humans and dogs engage in context-based meaningful exchanges via the technology's mediation. We show how an indexical semiotic perspective could inform the development of interspecies technology. Finally, we discuss the methodological issues raised by doing research with animals and propose an interspecies semiotics which integrates animal companions and animal researchers' accounts into ethnographic observation.

© All rights reserved Mancini et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
Edit | Del

Mancini, Clara, Rogers, Yvonne, Thomas, Keerthi, Joinson, Adam N., Price, Blaine A., Bandara, Arosha K., Jedrzejczyk, Lukasz and Nuseibeh, Bashar (2011): In the best families: tracking and relationships. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2419-2428. Available online

A growing body of research has been exploring the use of control mechanisms to address the privacy concerns raised by location-tracking technology. We report on a qualitative study of two family groups who used a custom-built tracking application for an extended period of time. Akin to sociological breaching experiments, the study focuses on the interferences between location tracking and relationship management. We analyze the tensions that can arise between affordances of the technology and uses that the contracts between family members legitimize. We describe how, by fostering misperceptions and 'nudging' behaviors, location-tracking technology can generate anxieties and conflicts even in close relationships. We discuss their vulnerability to the overreaching effects of tracking, against which the use of mechanisms such as location-sharing preferences and feedback may not be socially viable.

© All rights reserved Mancini et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
Edit | Del

Boesen, Julie, Rode, Jennifer A. and Mancini, Clara (2010): The domestic panopticon: location tracking in families. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 65-74. Available online

We present a qualitative study examining Location-Based Service (LBS) usage by families and how it is integrated into everyday life. We establish that LBS, when used for tracking purposes, affords a means of digital nurturing; that said, we discuss how LBS surveillance has the potential to undermine trust and serve as a detriment to nurturing.

© All rights reserved Boesen et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Mancini, Clara, Rogers, Yvonne, Bandara, Arosha K., Coe, Tony, Jedrzejczyk, Lukasz, Joinson, Adam N., Price, Blaine A., Thomas, Keerthi and Nuseibeh, Bashar (2010): Contravision: exploring users' reactions to futuristic technology. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 153-162. Available online

How can we best explore the range of users' reactions when developing future technologies that may be controversial, such as personal healthcare systems? Our approach -- ContraVision -- uses futuristic videos, or other narrative forms, that convey either negative or positive aspects of the proposed technology for the same scenarios. We conducted a user study to investigate what range of responses the different versions elicited. Our findings show that the use of two systematically comparable representations of the same technology can elicit a wider spectrum of reactions than a single representation can. We discuss why this is so and the value of obtaining breadth in user feedback for potentially controversial technologies.

© All rights reserved Mancini et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Price, Blaine A., Mancini, Clara, Rogers, Yvonne, Bandara, Arosha K., Coe, Tony, Joinson, Adam N., Lay, Jeffrey A. and Nuseibeh, Bashar (2010): ContraVision: presenting contrasting visions of future technology. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4759-4764. Available online

How can we best explore the range of users' reactions when developing future technologies that may be controversial, such as personal healthcare systems? Our approach -- ContraVision -- uses futuristic videos, or other narrative forms, that convey both negative and positive aspects of the proposed technology for the same scenarios.

© All rights reserved Price et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
Edit | Del

Thomas, Keerthi, Mancini, Clara, Jedrzejczyk, Lukasz, Bandara, Arosha K., Joinson, Adam, Price, Blaine A., Rogers, Yvonne and Nuseibeh, Bashar (2009): Studying location privacy in mobile applications: 'predator vs. prey' probes. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2009. p. 33. Available online

2006
 
Edit | Del

Mancini, Clara and Shum, Simon Buckingham (2006): Modelling discourse in contested domains: A semiotic and cognitive framework. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 64 (11) pp. 1154-1171. Available online

This paper examines the representational requirements for interactive, collaborative systems intended to support sensemaking and argumentation over contested issues. We argue that a perspective supported by semiotic and cognitively oriented discourse analyses offers both theoretical insights and motivates representational requirements for the semantics of tools for contesting meaning. We introduce our semiotic approach, highlighting its implications for discourse representation, before describing a research system (ClaiMaker) designed to support the construction of scholarly argumentation by allowing analysts to publish and contest 'claims' about scientific contributions. We show how ClaiMaker's representational scheme is grounded in specific assumptions concerning the nature of explicit modelling, and the evolution of meaning within a discourse community. These characteristics allow the system to represent scholarly discourse as a dynamic process, in the form of continuously evolving structures. A cognitively oriented discourse analysis then shows how the use of a small set of cognitive relational primitives in the underlying ontology opens possibilities for offering users advanced forms of computational service for analysing collectively constructed argumentation networks.

© All rights reserved Mancini and Shum and/or Academic Press

2004
 
Edit | Del

Mancini, Clara and Shum, Simon Buckingham (2004): Towards 'cinematic' hypertext. In: Proceedings of the Fifteenth ACM Conference on Hypertext 2004. pp. 215-224. Available online

This paper proposes the paradigm of 'Cinematic' Hypertext (CH), in which discourse form is represented following principles that underpin the expression of narrative patterns in cinema. Primarily tackling hypertext discourse coherence in the non-linear medium, CH is conceived as a way of thinking the hypertext medium that is consistent with its characteristics. CH envisages the consistent and concurrent use of the medium's formal features, grounded in structuring principles, in order to allow the emergence of a local language. Relational primitives based on Cognitive Coherence Relations are proposed as a structuring principle to define hypertext links, while the use the medium's graphic features is proposed to render these relational primitives as patterns that will take shape during navigation. Taking scholarly hypertext as a domain, this paper articulates the theoretical basis for cinematic hypertext, presents the elements of a prototype visual language to express a sub-set of CCR, provides experimental evidence of its significance, and finally envisages the realisation of a cinematic hypertext environment.

© All rights reserved Mancini and Shum and/or ACM Press

2001
 
Edit | Del

Mancini, Clara and Buckingham, Simon Shum (2001): Cognitive coherence relations and hypertext: from cinematic patterns to scholarly discourse. In: Hypertext'01 - Proceedings of the Twelfth ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia August 14-18, 2001, Aarhus, Denmark. pp. 165-174. Available online

In previous work we argued that cinematic language may provide insights into the construction of narrative coherence in hypertext, and we identified in the shot juxtaposition of rhetorical patterns the source of coherence for cinematic discourse. Here we deepen our analysis, to show how the mechanisms that underpin cinematic rhetorical patterns are the same as those providing coherence in written text. We draw on computational and psycholinguistic analyses of texts which have derived a set of relationships that are termed Cognitive Coherence Relations (CCR). We validate this by re-expressing established cinematic patterns, and relations relevant to scholarly hypertext, in terms of CCR, and with this conceptual bridge in place, present examples to show how cinematic techniques could assist the presentation of scholarly discourse. This theoretical work also informs system design. We describe how an abstract relational layer based on CCR is being implemented as a semantic hypertext system to mediate scholarly discourse.

© All rights reserved Mancini and Buckingham and/or ACM Press

2000
 
Edit | Del

Mancini, Clara (2000): From Cinematographic to Hypertext Narrative. In: Hypertext 00 - Proceedings of the Eleventh ACM Conference on Hypertext and Hypermedia May 30 - June 03, 2000, San Antonio, Texas, USA. pp. 236-237. Available online

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/clara_mancini.html