Publication statistics

Pub. period:2009-2011
Pub. count:5
Number of co-authors:3



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Stephen Brewster:3
Stephen A. Brewster:2
Craig Pinkerton:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Christopher McAdam's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Stephen A. Brewste..:108
Stephen Brewster:21
Craig Pinkerton:1
 
 
 
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Christopher McAdam

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Publications by Christopher McAdam (bibliography)

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2011
 
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McAdam, Christopher and Brewster, Stephen (2011): Using mobile phones to interact with tabletop computers. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2011. pp. 232-241.

Tabletop computers can be used by several people at the same time, and many are likely to be carrying mobile phones. We examine different ways of performing interactions in this multi-device ecology. We conducted a study into the use of a phone as a controller for a dial manipulation task, comparing three different forms of interaction: direct touch, using the phone as a general-purpose tangible controller on a tabletop computer and manipulating the dial directly on the phone's screen. We also examined user performance for these interactions both with and without tactile feedback from the phone. We found interacting on the phone itself fastest overall, with tactile feedback improving performance. We also show a range of concerns that users have about using their phone as a controller. The results suggest that using a phone and table together can sometimes be better than using the table alone.

© All rights reserved McAdam and Brewster and/or ACM Press

 
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McAdam, Christopher and Brewster, Stephen (2011): Multimodal feedback for tabletop interactions. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2011. pp. 274-275.

This paper presents a study into the use of different modalities in providing per contact feedback for interactions on tabletop computers. We replicate the study by Wigdor et al. [3] and confirm their results, and extend the study to examine not just visual feedback but also audio and tactile feedback. We show that these different modalities can be as effective as the visual system used in that study, and are preferred by the participants.

© All rights reserved McAdam and Brewster and/or ACM Press

 
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McAdam, Christopher and Brewster, Stephen (2011): Mobile phones as a tactile display for tabletop typing. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2011. pp. 276-277.

This paper presents a study into the use of mobile phones as private tactile displays for interactions with tabletop computers. Text entry performance on tabletop computers is often poor due to the soft keyboards that are normally used. We propose using the vibration motor in the user's mobile phone to provide tactile feedback to improve the experience and performance of typing on tabletop computers. We ran an experiment to compare the effects of two different sets of tactile feedback when delivered at two different distal locations on the body (wrist and trouser pocket) using a high quality actuator. The results showed that both sets of feedback improved the text entry rates at the two locations, and that providing more complex feedback produces greater benefits than simplified feedback. We also establish a baseline for standard text entry performance by novice users on tabletop computers using MacKenzie's phrase set.

© All rights reserved McAdam and Brewster and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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McAdam, Christopher, Pinkerton, Craig and Brewster, Stephen A. (2010): Novel interfaces for digital cameras and camera phones. In: Proceedings of 12th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2010. pp. 143-152.

Camera phones are now very common but there are some usability issues that affect their use. These can occur because the users look through the LCD to frame the image and can often miss the icons displayed around the edges that present important information about the status of the camera. This may lead to shots being missed or poorly exposed. Most camera phones do not take full advantage of the features of the underlying phone platform to enhance their interfaces. We created a camera application for the Nokia N95 that featured novel interface elements and made use of the features of the platform to provide a rich variety of information in more usable forms, such as: sonifications of the luminance histogram to ensure better exposure before a picture is taken; phone orientation to give a level indicator to ensure the camera is straight; measuring phone movement to ensure the phone is being held steady; and the detection of image motion to support panning We also present a scenario for how these features could be used in conjunction with each other during the photo taking process.

© All rights reserved McAdam et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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McAdam, Christopher and Brewster, Stephen A. (2009): Distal tactile feedback for text entry on tabletop computers. In: Proceedings of the HCI09 Conference on People and Computers XXIII 2009. pp. 504-511.

In this paper we present an initial study into the feasibility of using a mobile phone as a personal tactile display when interacting with a tabletop computer. There has been an increase in recent years in large touchscreen computers that use soft keyboards for text input. Text entry performance on such keyboards can be poor due to the lack of tactile feedback from the keys. Our approach is to use the vibration motor in a user's mobile phone to provide personal haptic feedback for interactions with the touchscreen computer. We ran an experiment to compare text entry on a touchscreen device with the tactile feedback being presented at different distal locations on the body (locations at which a user might keep a mobile device. The conditions were: no tactile feedback, feedback directly on the device, feedback at the wrist, upper arm, chest, belt and trouser pocket). The results showed that distal tactile feedback significantly increased text entry rates when presented to the wrist and upper arm. This was not at the expense of a reduction in text entry accuracy. This shows that the concept of presenting tactile feedback on a user's phone is an effective one and can improve interaction and text entry on tabletop computers.

© All rights reserved McAdam and Brewster and/or their publisher

 
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Changes to this page (author)

04 Apr 2012: Modified
04 Apr 2012: Modified
04 Apr 2012: Modified
03 Nov 2010: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Added

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/christopher_mcadam.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2009-2011
Pub. count:5
Number of co-authors:3



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Stephen Brewster:3
Stephen A. Brewster:2
Craig Pinkerton:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Christopher McAdam's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Stephen A. Brewste..:108
Stephen Brewster:21
Craig Pinkerton:1
 
 
 
Jul 30

It's all about one thing: creative problem-solving to get the story out.

-- Robert Greenberg, R/GA, 2006

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!