Publication statistics

Pub. period:1997-2011
Pub. count:8
Number of co-authors:9



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Winyu Chinthammit:
Paddy Nixon:
Jo-Anne Kelder:

 

 

Productive colleagues

Christopher Lueg's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Paddy Nixon:24
Nicola J. Bidwell:11
Jeff Axup:5
 
 
 

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Christopher Lueg

Dr.sc.nat.

Personal Homepage:
cis.utas.edu.au/users/clueg/

Current place of employment:
University of Tasmania, Australia

Professor of Computing

 

Publications by Christopher Lueg (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Neale, Steven, Chinthammit, Winyu, Lueg, Christopher and Nixon, Paddy (2011): Natural interactions between augmented virtual objects. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Australian Computer-Human Interaction Conference 2011. pp. 229-232. Available online

There are many situations in which physical interaction with real-world objects is not possible -- for example, museums contain many objects or artefacts which are too fragile or expensive for the public to handle. Augmented Reality (AR) has the potential to offer an alternative in these situations, but most of our current interactions with virtual objects in AR tend to be indirect. Tangible AR allows for natural movement, but we rarely manipulate or control virtual objects beyond that in the way we do their physical counterparts. To address this problem, we propose that a more natural approach to interacting with tangible AR be introduced. We present a prototype that allows users to physically orientate virtual objects so that they 'snap' together in order to complete a '3D AR Puzzle', and show that introducing 'responsive virtual objects' for tangible AR is a promising first step towards more natural interactions.

© All rights reserved Neale et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kelder, Jo-Anne and Lueg, Christopher (2011): Information grounds and micro information seeking: unpacking the complexities of community education and recruitment in breast screening service delivery. In: Proceedings of the 2011 iConference 2011. pp. 356-362. Available online

Public health education is an important part of national health systems that is intended to have a positive impact on the health behaviours of citizens and prevent health problems developing that require costly interactions with the acute health care system. In this paper we report findings from a twelve month ethnographic case study that collected observation, document/artefact and semi-structured interview data related to the information activities involved in community education work, specifically the targeted delivery of breast cancer information to relevant parts of a demographically defined community. We applied Leckie et al's (1996) model of the information behavior of professionals to highlight specific characteristics of different tasks and environments involved in professional breast cancer information delivery. The two main contributions of the paper are 1. an analysis of the way information grounds are both sought and leveraged in order to distribute information in breast cancer information delivery, and 2. the importance of (and understanding of) micro-information seeking in leveraging information grounds.

© All rights reserved Kelder and Lueg and/or ACM Press

2009
 
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Buttfield-Addison, Paris, Lueg, Christopher and Manning, Jonathon (2009): The pile of least effort: supporting lived document management practices. In: Proceedings of OZCHI09, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2009. pp. 345-348. Available online

This paper outlines early results from ethnographic research examining the ways people organise and manage their personal documents in an office, with a focus on people who engage in piling. The study encompassed in-depth interview data, questionnaire data and explorations of technology prototypes with participants. We build upon existing personal information management (PIM) research and develop a framework to encompass the real world of paper document management. In this paper, we highlight the challenges of being a piler, and suggest how they might be remedied or alleviated through design considerations for future support systems.

© All rights reserved Buttfield-Addison et al. and/or their publisher

2007
 
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Lueg, Christopher and Martin, Sam (2007): Users Dealing with Spam and Spam Filters: Some Observations and Recommendations. In: 8th International New Zealand Conference on Computer-Human Interaction (SIGCHI-NZ 2007) 1-4 July 2007, 2007, Hamilton, New Zealand. .

The email communication system is threatened by unsolicited commercial email aka spam. In response, spam filters have been deployed widely to help reduce the amount of spam users have to cope with. This paper describes work towards helping users better understand the often complex decision making that is spam filtering. An investigation of a number of popular web-based email services suggests that the filtering process is typically implemented as a black box allowing very little user involvement. In order to explore how we could help users understand how spam filters work and how they assess messages we conducted a number of user experiments using a simulated email interface providing richer spam filtering information than the webmail interfaces we investigated. Feedback indicates that additional information provided by the interface would be welcome and suggests to further investigate ways to involve users in the filtering process.

© All rights reserved Lueg and Martin and/or ACM

 
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Lueg, Christopher and Martin, Sam (2007): Users dealing with spam and spam filters: some observations and recommendations. In: Proceedings of CHINZ07, the ACM SIGCHI New Zealand Chapters International Conference on Computer-Human Interaction 1-4 July 2007, 2007, Hamilton, New Zealand. pp. 67-72. Available online

The email communication system is threatened by unsolicited commercial email aka spam. In response, spam filters have been deployed widely to help reduce the amount of spam users have to cope with. This paper describes work towards helping users better understand the often complex decision making that is spam filtering. An investigation of a number of popular web-based email services suggests that the filtering process is typically implemented as a black box allowing very little user involvement. In order to explore how we could help users understand how spam filters work and how they assess messages we conducted a number of user experiments using a simulated email interface providing richer spam filtering information than the webmail interfaces we investigated. Feedback indicates that additional information provided by the interface would be welcome and suggests to further investigate ways to involve users in the filtering process.

© All rights reserved Lueg and Martin and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Bidwell, Nicola J., Lueg, Christopher and Axup, Jeff (2005): The territory is the map: designing navigational aids. In: Proceedings of CHINZ05, the ACM SIGCHI New Zealand Chapters International Conference on Computer-Human Interaction 2005. pp. 91-100. Available online

It has been shown that people encounter difficulties in using representations and devices designed to assist navigating unfamiliar terrain. Literature review and self-reported visual and textual data from field experiments are presented. This suggests usability may be limited by assumptions about landmarks implicit in designing representations. Firstly, memorable landmarks are emphasized but route following in situ requires recognizable landmarks. Secondly, little emphasis is placed on differences between landmarks contributing to higher-level concepts related to wayfinding and those directly provoking actions in the environment. Studies analyse landmarks in SMS during collaborative wayfinding to an unfamiliar rendezvous and in images to communicate routes in unfamiliar terrain. Findings illustrate usability benefits for navigation aids. This includes helping users to align a landmark's illustration to their individual perspective in the environment. It also includes identifying landmark salience for shared use by people navigating in dispersed groups to dynamically-negotiated rendezvous.

© All rights reserved Bidwell et al. and/or ACM Press

1998
 
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Lueg, Christopher (1998): Supporting Situated Actions in High Volume Conversational Data Situations. In: Karat, Clare-Marie, Lund, Arnold, Coutaz, Jolle and Karat, John (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 98 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 18-23, 1998, Los Angeles, California. pp. 472-479. Available online

The global conferencing system Usenet news offers an amount of articles per day that exceeds human cognitive capabilities by far although the articles are already organized in hierarchically structured discussion groups covering distinct topics. We report here on a situated information filtering system that significantly reduces the burden by supporting the user in acting situated. Interpreting the user's actions as situated actions, the approach complements current filtering and recommender approaches by completely avoiding the modeling of user interests; the user is the only instance for assigning (un-)interestingness to Usenet discussions.

© All rights reserved Lueg and/or ACM Press

1997
 
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Lueg, Christopher (1997): An Adaptive USENET Interface Supporting Situated Actions. In: Stephanidis, Constantine and Carbonell, Noelle (eds.) Proceedings of the 3rd ERCIM Workshop on User Interfaces for All 1997. p. 6. Available online

In this paper, we discuss a novel approach to support users in information overload situations. This situated approach is based on the perspective that human cognition is most appropriately described as situated. In this context, situated means that human cognition is considered as an emergent property of the interaction of an individual with his or her environment. Our work aims at supporting humans in coping with information overload situations. In order to account for situatedness, we only support users in finding interesting information instead of automating the search task. Reading Usenet news is a prime example for situations with high volume conversational data. The global conferencing system Usenet offers an amount of conversational data per day that exceeds human cognitive capabilities by far. We have augmented a standard newsreading tool to offer support for situated actions. First experiences with the augmented newsreader are encouraging and suggest that this situated approach is an interesting complement to traditional information filtering approaches.

© All rights reserved Lueg and/or ERCIM

 
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