Publication statistics

Pub. period:2005-2012
Pub. count:20
Number of co-authors:25



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Erin A. Carroll:7
Danielle Lottridge:5
Melissa Word:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Celine Latulipe's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Steve Mann:52
Charles L. A. Clar..:35
Edward Lank:26
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
UI Design Patterns for Successful Software
Starts tomorrow LAST CALL!
go to course
Affordances: Designing Intuitive User Interfaces
Starts the day after tomorrow !
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Celine Latulipe

 

Publications by Celine Latulipe (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
Edit | Del

Carroll, Erin A., Lottridge, Danielle, Latulipe, Celine, Singh, Vikash and Word, Melissa (2012): Bodies in critique: a technological intervention in the dance production process. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 705-714. Available online

The dance production process is strongly influenced within the physical rehearsal space by social context factors and dynamics, such as intimacy of bodies, gender distribution, and the hierarchy of choreographers and dancers. Introducing online tools for asynchronous collaboration can change the traditional dance production process and impact the social dynamics of the group. We developed and deployed the Choreographer's Notebook, a web-based, collaborative, multi-modal annotation tool used in the creative process of making dance. We collected usage logs and choreographer reflections on the use of this tool, along with conducting interviews and focus groups, from the interdisciplinary perspectives of both technologists and choreographers involved in the project. We describe the socio-technical impacts of the Choreographer's Notebook based on the results of its usage in three dance productions. We analyze these case studies through various contextual lenses and provide a visualization of how the choreographic correction process evolved.

© All rights reserved Carroll et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Carroll, Erin A. and Latulipe, Celine (2012): Triangulating the personal creative experience: self-report, external judgments, and physiology. In: Proceedings of the 2012 Conference on Graphics Interface 2012. pp. 53-60. Available online

We investigate the measurement of 'in-the-moment creativity' (ITMC) as a step towards developing new evaluation methods for improving creativity support tools (CSTs). We consider ITMC to be the periods of intense personal creative experience within a temporal, creative work process. Our approach to this work involves a triangulation method of several temporal metrics, including self-report ratings, external judgments, and physiological measurements. The experiment described in this paper involves participants sketching for 30 minutes while wearing EEG and being screen recorded. Participants and external judges used a special video application to watch, identify and rate periods of personal creative experience during the sketching activity. Our results indicate that people are comfortable self-reporting ITMC, and our work sets the stage for more extensive research that makes use of temporal, granular measures of the personal creative experience.

© All rights reserved Carroll and Latulipe and/or their publisher

2011
 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine, Carroll, Erin A. and Lottridge, Danielle (2011): Evaluating longitudinal projects combining technology with temporal arts. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1835-1844. Available online

The integration of interactive technology with temporal art such as dance is an exciting, emerging area. The design space for such collaborations is immense, with variations in sensors, visualizations, and how these interact with dancers and choreography. This paper presents the evaluation methodology and results of Dance.Draw, a longitudinal project spanning two years and three productions, which aimed to develop a deep, interdisciplinary understanding of this space. Given that this is pioneering work, there is little guidance on how to evaluate such collaborations. We describe the significant confounds in doing evaluation in this area, and we present our evolving mixed-methods approach, which includes two unique methods to address the multiple stakeholders in a holistic manner: dancer focus groups and repeated presentations. Our approach has generated insights, such as differing perspectives of audience members and the responses of dancers to technological variables. We conclude by discussing the challenges and successes of our evaluation approach.

© All rights reserved Latulipe et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine, Carroll, Erin A. and Lottridge, Danielle (2011): Love, hate, arousal and engagement: exploring audience responses to performing arts. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1845-1854. Available online

Understanding audience responses to art and performance is a challenge. New sensors are promising for measurement of implicit and explicit audience engagement. However, the meaning of biometric data, and its relationship to engagement, is unclear. We conceptually explore the audience engagement domain to uncover opportunities and challenges in the assessment and interpretation of audience engagement data. We developed a display that linked performance videos with audience biometric data and presented it to 7 performing arts experts, to explore the measurement, interpretation and application of biometric data. Experts were intrigued by the response data and reflective in interpreting it. We deepened our inquiry with an empirical study with 49 participants who watched a video of a dance performance. We related temporal galvanic skin response (GSR) data to two self-report scales, which provided insights on interpreting this measure. Our findings, which include strong correlations, support the interpretation of GSR as a valid representation of audience engagement.

© All rights reserved Latulipe et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Gonzalez, Berto and Latulipe, Celine (2011): BiCEP: bimanual color exploration plugin. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1483-1488. Available online

In this paper we describe a bimanual color exploration plugin (BiCEP) that allows a user to choose colors along three dimensions: hue, saturation, and brightness without mode switching between these dimensions. The plugin differs from other color selection tools by allowing users to simultaneously change all three dimensions utilizing a laptop trackpad with multi-touch tracking capabilities. We believe this methodology will improve the range of color exploration by allowing users to more easily explore a wider range of colors.

© All rights reserved Gonzalez and Latulipe and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine, Wilson, David, Huskey, Sybil, Gonzalez, Berto and Word, Melissa (2011): Temporal integration of interactive technology in dance: creative process impacts. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2011. pp. 107-116. Available online

Interdisciplinary projects bridging technology and the arts face challenges across many dimensions. In this paper, we reflect on the issue of temporal constraints on integrations of interactive technology within dance production. We describe lessons learned and illustrate practical impacts on stakeholders, creative process and outcomes from over three years of experience in developing dance productions at our university. Specifically, we reflect on perceptions of how the timing of the technology integrations impacted the creativity of the stakeholders involved. We separate results that are idiosyncratic to our project and highlight those that we expect are more generally applicable to other art and technology projects. Finally, we provide a set of temporal integration considerations that others can use to assess when it is best to integrate technology into an arts project.

© All rights reserved Latulipe et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Singh, Vikash, Latulipe, Celine, Carroll, Erin and Lottridge, Danielle (2011): The choreographer's notebook: a video annotation system for dancers and choreographers. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2011. pp. 197-206. Available online

We present a collaborative tool for choreographers and dancers, the Choreographer's Notebook, which allows multimodal annotation of rehearsal videos during the dance production process. The dance production process is a creative process in which exploration and expression are paramount and we describe issues we have observed over four different dance production cycles. The Choreographer's Notebook addresses the recurring problem of scarcity of rehearsal time and space, which is a limiting factor for exploration and expression. The tool is a web-based video application that enables choreographers to provide multimodal, context-sensitive instructions and feedback to the dancers outside of formal rehearsal time. The novelty of this tool is its ability to provide a multimodal collaborative video-based workflow. This article also presents a thorough ethnographic investigation of the dance production process and results from the use of the Choreographer's Notebook as an artifact within that process.

© All rights reserved Singh et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Carroll, Erin A. and Latulipe, Celine (2011): Capturing 'in the moment' creativity through data triangulation. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2011. pp. 321-322. Available online

We present a first attempt at capturing 'in the moment' creativity (ITMC) through a triangulation self-report techniques, external judges, and physiological measures. In our study, participants were asked to sketch for 30 minutes while wearing GSR and EEG; then they retrospectively self-reported their creativity using a custom interface. External judges were also utilized to rate when participants were creative. Our initial results indicate high reliability for self-reporting ITMC, consensus between judges and participants, and that physiological measures trended according to the expectations from research. Our work sets the stage for more extensive research that makes use of temporal measures of creativity.

© All rights reserved Carroll and Latulipe and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine, Wilson, David, Gonzalez, Berto, Harris, Adam, Carroll, Erin, Huskey, Sybil, Word, Melissa, Beasley, Robert and Nifong, Nathan (2011): SoundPainter. In: Proceedings of the 2011 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2011. pp. 439-440. Available online

SoundPainter is an interactive dance performance that features a triad of dancers, musicians and projected visuals, where each of these three elements reacts to one another through improvisation, algorithmic representations of sound and vision-based technology.

© All rights reserved Latulipe et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine, Wilson, David, Huskey, Sybil, Word, Melissa, Carroll, Arthur, Carroll, Erin, Gonzalez, Berto, Singh, Vikash, Wirth, Mike and Lottridge, Danielle (2010): Exploring the design space in technology-augmented dance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2995-3000. Available online

In this paper we describe the process and technology behind a dance performance, "Bodies/Antibodies," that will be presented at CHI 2010. This performance is part of an ongoing Dance. Draw project at the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, which investigates lightweight methods for integrating dance motion with interactive visualizations and enhancing audience interaction with dance.

© All rights reserved Latulipe et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine and Manning, Annabel (2010): Layered surveillance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3007-3012. Available online

Artist Annabel Manning explores the world of immigration and identity, and explores imagery related to border crossings and surveillance. Computer Scientist Celine Latulipe explores embodied, collaborative interaction. The intersection of these two worlds leads to research in embodied collaborative interaction and an interactive art exhibit in which participants can explore both static images through interactive layers, and moving video through interactive surveillance lenses. Participants can explore alone or with others, using gyroscopic mice to control different aspects of the artwork. The participants are led, through interaction, to contemplate the (in)visibility of the immigrant and the agency of surveillance.

© All rights reserved Latulipe and Manning and/or their publisher

2009
 
Edit | Del

Carroll, Erin A. and Latulipe, Celine (2009): The creativity support index. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 4009-4014. Available online

We present a draft survey tool called the Creativity Support Index (CSI). The CSI is similar to the NASA Task Load Index Survey but is designed specifically for evaluating creativity support tools, based on concepts and theories from creativity research.

© All rights reserved Carroll and Latulipe and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Carroll, Erin A., Latulipe, Celine, Fung, Richard and Terry, Michael (2009): Creativity factor evaluation: towards a standardized survey metric for creativity support. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2009. pp. 127-136. Available online

We present a new survey metric, the Creativity Support Index (CSI) that is designed to help researchers and designers evaluate the level of creativity support provided by various systems or interfaces. We initially employed a top-down literature-based approach to develop a beta version of the Creativity Support Index (Beta CSI). We discuss our usage of the Beta CSI in three different studies and what we learned from those deployments. We also present the results from an extensive creativity vocabulary study (n=300), which revealed a set of orthogonal creativity factors. This led to the current version of the CSI presented in this paper. Initial results from these formative evaluations suggest the value of this tool in assessing and comparing creativity support tools at points in time and longitudinally.

© All rights reserved Carroll et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine, Youngblood, Michael, Bell, Ian and Orlando, Carissa (2009): ToneZone: image exploration with spatial memory cues. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2009. pp. 427-428. Available online

We present two versions of the ToneZone tool, which allows users to explore image tone ranges. The original ToneZone tool is a dual-mouse, dual-cursor tool, while a modified version requires only a single mouse and cursor. Both tools are designed to encourage non-experts to explore the powerful interaction of tone range manipulation.

© All rights reserved Latulipe et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
Edit | Del

Fung, Richard, Lank, Edward, Terry, Michael and Latulipe, Celine (2008): Kinematic templates: end-user tools for content-relative cursor manipulations. In: Cousins, Steve B. and Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (eds.) Proceedings of the 21st Annual ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 19-22, 2008, Monterey, CA, USA. pp. 47-56. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine and Huskey, Sybil (2008): Dance.Draw: Exquisite Interaction. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 47-51. Available online

We present a light-weight, low-cost, portable system for interactive dance performances in which projected visualizations reflect the dancers' movements in real-time. This project has spawned a new and exciting collaboration between dance and technology at UNC Charlotte.

© All rights reserved Latulipe and Huskey and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine and Lipford, Heather Richter (2008): The HCI Lab at UNC Charlotte. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 169-170. Available online

At the Human Computer Interaction Lab (HCILab) at UNC Charlotte, we investigate novel ways for people to interact with computers, and through computers with their environments. Our research covers a broad range of areas within Human Computer Interaction, such as Novel Interaction and Multimedia, Privacy, Creativity, and Visual Analytics. We collaborate with researchers in a number of areas related to HCI, such as visualization, gaming, art, and psychology. We also study interaction in a variety of domains such as intelligent information systems, information privacy and security, image processing and graphics, and intelligence analysis.

© All rights reserved Latulipe and Lipford and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine and Terry, Michael (2008): Evaluation Instruments for Creativity Support Tools. In: Proceedings of the HCI08 Conference on People and Computers XXII 2008. pp. 187-188. Available online

Significant research has been dedicated to the development of creativity support tools, tools intended to amplify human creativity in the arts, sciences, and design disciplines. While examples of such tools abound, instruments are generally lacking to systematically and reliably assess these tools' impact on the creative process. Without these instruments, it is difficult to identify what aspects of a tool's design most positively affect the creative process. This workshop will focus on the development of evaluation instruments for creativity support tools. From this workshop, we expect a range of instruments to be proposed, explored, and eventually developed. These instruments will range from cognitive assessment instruments (e.g., modified forms of the NASA TLX), to heuristic evaluations for creativity support tools, to techniques that meld with qualitative methods.

© All rights reserved Latulipe and Terry and/or their publisher

2006
 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine, Mann, Steve, Kaplan, Craig S. and Clarke, Charlie L. A. (2006): symSpline: symmetric two-handed spline manipulation. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 349-358. Available online

We introduce symSpline: a symmetric, dual-mouse technique for the manipulation of spline curves. In symSpline, two cursors control the positions of the ends of the tangent to an edit point. By moving the tangent with both mice, the tangent and the edit point can be translated while the curvature of the spline is adjusted simultaneously, according to the length and angle of the tangent. We compare the symSpline technique to two asymmetric dual-mouse spline manipulation techniques and to a standard single-mouse technique. In a spline matching experiment, symSpline outperformed the two asymmetric dual-mouse techniques and all three dual-mouse techniques proved to be faster than the single-mouse technique. Additionally, symSpline was the technique most preferred by test participants.

© All rights reserved Latulipe et al. and/or ACM Press

2005
 
Edit | Del

Latulipe, Celine, Kaplan, Craig S. and Clarke, Charles L. A. (2005): Bimanual and unimanual image alignment: an evaluation of mouse-based techniques. In: Proceedings of the 2005 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2005. pp. 123-131. Available online

We present an evaluation of three mouse-based techniques for aligning digital images. We investigate the physical image alignment task and discuss the implications for interacting with virtual images. In a formal evaluation we show that a symmetric bimanual technique outperforms an asymmetric bimanual technique which in turn outperforms a unimanual technique. We show that even after mode switching times are removed, the symmetric technique outperforms the single mouse technique. Subjects also exhibited more parallel interaction using the symmetric technique than when using the asymmetric technique.

© All rights reserved Latulipe et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/celine_latulipe.html