Publication statistics

Pub. period:2010-2011
Pub. count:4
Number of co-authors:5



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Robert E. Kraut:2
Aniket Kittur:2
Susheel Khamkar:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Boris Smus's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Robert E. Kraut:98
Mark D. Gross:31
Aniket Kittur:27
 
 
 

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Boris Smus

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Publications by Boris Smus (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Kittur, Aniket, Smus, Boris and Kraut, Robert E. (2011): CrowdForge: crowdsourcing complex work. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1801-1806.

Micro-task markets such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk represent a new paradigm for accomplishing work, in which employers can tap into a large population of workers around the globe to accomplish tasks in a fraction of the time and money of more traditional methods. However, such markets typically support only simple, independent tasks, such as labeling an image or judging the relevance of a search result. Here we present a general purpose framework for micro-task markets that provides a scaffolding for more complex human computation tasks which require coordination among many individuals, such as writing an article.

© All rights reserved Kittur et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Kittur, Aniket, Smus, Boris, Khamkar, Susheel and Kraut, Robert E. (2011): CrowdForge: crowdsourcing complex work. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2011. pp. 43-52.

Micro-task markets such as Amazon's Mechanical Turk represent a new paradigm for accomplishing work, in which employers can tap into a large population of workers around the globe to accomplish tasks in a fraction of the time and money of more traditional methods. However, such markets have been primarily used for simple, independent tasks, such as labeling an image or judging the relevance of a search result. Here we present a general purpose framework for accomplishing complex and interdependent tasks using micro-task markets. We describe our framework, a web-based prototype, and case studies on article writing, decision making, and science journalism that demonstrate the benefits and limitations of the approach.

© All rights reserved Kittur et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Smus, Boris and Kostakos, Vassilis (2010): Running gestures: hands-free interaction during physical activity. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 433-434.

This paper presents Running Gestures, an interaction technique that relies on foot gestures while running. A prototype and evaluation of one of the proposed gestures, a mid-stride skip, is presented in detail. The developed prototype is used by runners to change the currently playing music track, and the evaluation compares users' performance in relation to other methods of changing tracks while running. The results show that Running Gestures is a highly effective way of interacting with a system when running.

© All rights reserved Smus and Kostakos and/or their publisher

 
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Smus, Boris and Gross, Mark D. (2010): Ubiquitous drums: a tangible, wearable musical interface. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4009-4014.

Drummers and non-drummers alike can often be seen making percussive gestures on their chests, knees and feet. Ubiquitous Drums enhances this experience by providing musical feedback for these and other gestures. This paper describes the implementation and evolution of this tangible, wearable musical instrument.

© All rights reserved Smus and Gross and/or their publisher

 
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Changes to this page (author)

05 Apr 2012: Modified
05 Jul 2011: Modified
02 Nov 2010: Added
02 Nov 2010: Modified

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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/boris_smus.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2010-2011
Pub. count:4
Number of co-authors:5



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Robert E. Kraut:2
Aniket Kittur:2
Susheel Khamkar:1

 

 

Productive colleagues

Boris Smus's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Robert E. Kraut:98
Mark D. Gross:31
Aniket Kittur:27
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

UI Design Patterns for Successful Software

Starts tomorrow LAST CALL!
 
 
 

Affordances: Designing Intuitive User Interfaces

88% booked. Starts in 7 days
 
 
 
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 
 
 
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