Publication statistics

Pub. period:1991-2011
Pub. count:11
Number of co-authors:19



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Bashar Nuseibeh:7
Arosha K. Bandara:5
Lukasz Jedrzejczyk:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Blaine A. Price's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Yvonne Rogers:99
Ronald M. Baecker:67
John T. Stasko:60
 
 
 
Jul 29

There is an old English folk saying that goes, "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen." I have a different approach: Do something about the heat. The folk saying would have us accept the poor designs of the world. Why? After all, if people were responsible for the "heat" in the first place, then people should be able to do something about it. Is the kitchen too hot? Redesign it.

-- Don Norman

 
 

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User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

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Blaine A. Price

Picture of Blaine A. Price.

Blaine has always taken a human-centred approach to computing. He is interested in privacy in mobile and ubiquitous computing, including privacy in location aware applications. He is currently studying the synthesis of various lifelogging technologies for self improvement. He supervises PhD students in the areas of privacy in mobile computing and computer forensics. He is principal investigator on a number of Knowledge Transfer Partnership projects with industrial partners and co-investigator on PRiMMA (Privacy Rights Managment for Mobile Applications), a 1.2M EPSRC funded joint project with Imperial College.

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Publications by Blaine A. Price (bibliography)

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2011
 
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Mancini, Clara, Rogers, Yvonne, Thomas, Keerthi, Joinson, Adam N., Price, Blaine A., Bandara, Arosha K., Jedrzejczyk, Lukasz and Nuseibeh, Bashar (2011): In the best families: tracking and relationships. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2419-2428.

A growing body of research has been exploring the use of control mechanisms to address the privacy concerns raised by location-tracking technology. We report on a qualitative study of two family groups who used a custom-built tracking application for an extended period of time. Akin to sociological breaching experiments, the study focuses on the interferences between location tracking and relationship management. We analyze the tensions that can arise between affordances of the technology and uses that the contracts between family members legitimize. We describe how, by fostering misperceptions and 'nudging' behaviors, location-tracking technology can generate anxieties and conflicts even in close relationships. We discuss their vulnerability to the overreaching effects of tracking, against which the use of mechanisms such as location-sharing preferences and feedback may not be socially viable.

© All rights reserved Mancini et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Jedrzejczyk, Lukasz, Price, Blaine A., Bandara, Arosha and Nuseibeh, Bashar (2010): "Privacy-shake",: a haptic interface for managing privacy settings in mobile location sharing applications. In: Proceedings of 12th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2010. pp. 411-412.

We describe the "Privacy-Shake", a novel interface for managing coarse grained privacy settings. We built a prototype that enables users of Buddy Tracker, an example location sharing application, to change their privacy preferences by shaking their phone. Users can enable or disable location sharing and change the level of granularity of disclosed location by shaking and sweeping their phone. In this poster we present and motivate our work on Privacy-Shake and report on a lab-based evaluation of the interface with 16 participants.

© All rights reserved Jedrzejczyk et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Jedrzejczyk, Lukasz, Price, Blaine A., Bandara, Arosha K. and Nuseibeh, Bashar (2010): On the impact of real-time feedback on users' behaviour in mobile location-sharing applications. In: Proceedings of the 2010 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2010. p. 14.

Effective privacy management requires that mobile systems' users be able to make informed privacy decisions as their experience and knowledge of a system progresses. Prior work has shown that making such privacy decisions is a difficult task for users because systems do not provide support for awareness, visibility and accountability when sharing privacy-sensitive information. This paper reports results of our investigation into the efficacy of realtime feedback as a mechanism for incorporating these features of social translucence in location-sharing applications, in order to help users make better privacy decisions. We explored the role of real-time feedback in the context of Buddy Tracker, a mobile location-sharing application. Our work focuses on ways in which real-time feedback affects people's behaviour in order to identify the main criteria for acceptance of this technology. Based on the data from a three week field trial of Buddy Tracker, a focus group session, and interviews, we found that when using a system that provided real-time feedback, people were more accountable for their actions and reduced the number of unreasonable location requests. We have used the results of our study to propose high-level design criteria for incorporating real-time feedback into information sharing applications in a manner that ensures social acceptance of the technology.

© All rights reserved Jedrzejczyk et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mancini, Clara, Rogers, Yvonne, Bandara, Arosha K., Coe, Tony, Jedrzejczyk, Lukasz, Joinson, Adam N., Price, Blaine A., Thomas, Keerthi and Nuseibeh, Bashar (2010): Contravision: exploring users' reactions to futuristic technology. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 153-162.

How can we best explore the range of users' reactions when developing future technologies that may be controversial, such as personal healthcare systems? Our approach -- ContraVision -- uses futuristic videos, or other narrative forms, that convey either negative or positive aspects of the proposed technology for the same scenarios. We conducted a user study to investigate what range of responses the different versions elicited. Our findings show that the use of two systematically comparable representations of the same technology can elicit a wider spectrum of reactions than a single representation can. We discuss why this is so and the value of obtaining breadth in user feedback for potentially controversial technologies.

© All rights reserved Mancini et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Price, Blaine A., Mancini, Clara, Rogers, Yvonne, Bandara, Arosha K., Coe, Tony, Joinson, Adam N., Lay, Jeffrey A. and Nuseibeh, Bashar (2010): ContraVision: presenting contrasting visions of future technology. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 4759-4764.

How can we best explore the range of users' reactions when developing future technologies that may be controversial, such as personal healthcare systems? Our approach -- ContraVision -- uses futuristic videos, or other narrative forms, that convey both negative and positive aspects of the proposed technology for the same scenarios.

© All rights reserved Price et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Thomas, Keerthi, Mancini, Clara, Jedrzejczyk, Lukasz, Bandara, Arosha K., Joinson, Adam, Price, Blaine A., Rogers, Yvonne and Nuseibeh, Bashar (2009): Studying location privacy in mobile applications: 'predator vs. prey' probes. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2009. p. 33.

2005
 
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Price, Blaine A., Adam, Karim and Nuseibeh, Bashar (2005): Keeping ubiquitous computing to yourself: A practical model for user control of privacy. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 63 (1) pp. 228-253.

As with all the major advances in information and communication technology, ubiquitous computing (ubicomp) introduces new risks to individual privacy. Our analysis of privacy protection in ubicomp has identified four layers through which users must navigate: the regulatory regime they are currently in, the type of ubicomp service required, the type of data being disclosed, and their personal privacy policy. We illustrate and compare the protection afforded by regulation and by some major models for user control of privacy. We identify the shortcomings of each and propose a model which allows user control of privacy levels in a ubicomp environment. Our model balances the user's privacy preferences against the applicable privacy regulations and incorporates five types of user controlled "noise" to protect location privacy by introducing ambiguities. We also incorporate an economics-based approach to assist users in balancing the trade-offs between giving up privacy and receiving ubicomp services. We conclude with a scenario and heuristic evaluation which suggests that regulation can have both positive and negative influences on privacy interfaces in ubicomp and that social translucence is an important heuristic for ubicomp privacy interface functionality.

© All rights reserved Price et al. and/or Academic Press

1998
 
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Stasko, John T., Domingue, John B., Brown, Marc H. and Price, Blaine A. (eds.) (1998): Software Visualization. The MIT Press

Foreword by Jim Foley In the past decade, high quality interfaces have become standard in a growing number of areas such as games and CD-ROM-based encyclopedias. Yet the overwhelming majority of programmers edit their code using a single font within a single window and view code execution via the hand insertion of print statements.Software Visualization (SV) redresses this imbalance by using typography, graphics, and animation techniques to show program code, data, and control flow. This book describes the history of SV, techniques and frameworks for its construction, its use in education and program debugging, and recent attempts to evaluate its effectiveness. In making programming a multimedia experience, SV leaves programmers and computer science researchers free to explore more interesting issues and to tackle more challenging problems.Contributors : Ronald Baecker, John Bazik, Alan Blackwell, Mike Brayshaw, Marc H. Brown, Wim De Pauw, John B. Domingue, Stephen Eick, Marc Eisenstadt, Christopher Fry, Peter Gloor, Thomas Green, Michael Heath, John Hershberger, Clinton L. Jeffery, Doug Kimelman, Eileen Kraemer, Andrea Lawrence, Henry Lieberman, Allen Malony, Aaron Marcus, Paul Mulholland, Marc Najork, Stephen North, Marian Petre, Blaine A. Price, Steven Reiss, Gruia-Catalin Roman, Diane Rover, Bryan Rosenburg, Tova Roth, Robert Sedgewick, Ian Small, John T. Stasko, Roberto Tamassia, Andries van Dam, John Vlissides.

© All rights reserved Stasko et al. and/or The MIT Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Aesthetic Computing: [/encyclopedia/aesthetic_computing.html]


 
1993
 
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Price, Blaine A., Baecker, Ronald M. and Small, Ian S. (1993): A Principled Taxonomy of Software Visualization. In J. Vis. Lang. Comput., 4 (3) pp. 211-266.

1992
 
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Domingue, John, Price, Blaine A. and Eisenstadt, Marc (1992): A framework for describing and implementing software visualization systems. In: Graphics Interface 92 May 11-15, 1992, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. pp. 53-60.

1991
 
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Price, Blaine A. and Baecker, Ronald M. (1991): The Automatic Animation of Concurrent Programs. In: First Moscow International HCI91 Workshop Proceedings 1991. pp. 128-137.

Much of the program visualization research to date has been devoted to hand-crafted animations of small sequential programs for use in computer science education. Instead, our work focuses on the development of automatic concurrent program visualization tools for use in software engineering. This paper describes a framework for concurrent program animation and a prototype tool based on this framework. Our user testing experiments with the prototype showed a significant increase in programmer insights when compared with conventional tools.

© All rights reserved Price and Baecker and/or Intl. Centre for Scientific And Technical Information

 
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Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/blaine_a__price.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1991-2011
Pub. count:11
Number of co-authors:19



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Bashar Nuseibeh:7
Arosha K. Bandara:5
Lukasz Jedrzejczyk:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Blaine A. Price's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Yvonne Rogers:99
Ronald M. Baecker:67
John T. Stasko:60
 
 
 
Jul 29

There is an old English folk saying that goes, "If you can't stand the heat, get out of the kitchen." I have a different approach: Do something about the heat. The folk saying would have us accept the poor designs of the world. Why? After all, if people were responsible for the "heat" in the first place, then people should be able to do something about it. Is the kitchen too hot? Redesign it.

-- Don Norman

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!