Publication statistics

Pub. period:1994-2012
Pub. count:34
Number of co-authors:67



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Lisa P. Nathan:7
Peter H. Kahn Jr.:6
Peter H. Kahn:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Batya Friedman's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ben Shneiderman:225
Kristina Hook:58
Eli Blevis:36
 
 
 

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Batya Friedman

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Publications by Batya Friedman (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Nilsen, Trond T., Grey, Nell Carden and Friedman, Batya (2012): Public curation of a historic collection: a means for speaking safely in public. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 277-278.

We showcase the Voices from the Rwanda Tribunal project and associated website that provides online public access to a set of historic video interviews with personnel from the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. The demonstration emphasizes the careful design process needed for a project of this sensitivity, including two technical features that democratize curation of the collection -- (1) public suggestions for video highlights and (2) public contribution of keywords in Kinyarwanda, English or French.

© All rights reserved Nilsen et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Woelfer, Jill Palzkill, Iverson, Amy, Hendry, David G., Friedman, Batya and Gill, Brian T. (2011): Improving the safety of homeless young people with mobile phones: values, form and function. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1707-1716.

By their pervasiveness and by being worn on our bodies, mobile phones seem to have become intrinsic to safety. To examine this proposition, 43 participants, from four stakeholder groups (homeless young people, service providers, police officers, and community members), were asked to consider how homeless young people could use mobile phones to keep safe. Participants were asked to express their knowledge for place-based safety and to envision how mobile phones might be used to improve safety. Detailed analysis of the resulting data, which included value sketches, written value scenarios, and semi-structured discussion, led to specific design opportunities, related to values (e.g., supporting trust and desire to help others), function (e.g., documenting harms for future purposes), and form (e.g., leveraging social expectations for how mobile phones can be used to influence behavior). Together, these findings bound a design space for how mobile phones can be used to manage unsafe situations.

© All rights reserved Woelfer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hourcade, Juan Pablo, Bullock-Rest, Natasha E., Friedman, Batya, Nelson, Mark, Shneiderman, Ben and Zaphiris, Panayiotis (2011): HCI for peace: from idealism to concrete steps. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 613-616.

This panel will contribute diverse perspectives on the use of computer technology to promote peace and prevent armed conflict. These perspectives include: the use of social media to promote democracy and citizen participation, the role of computers in helping people communicate across division lines in zones of conflict, how persuasive technology can promote peace, and how interaction design can play a role in post-conflict reconciliation.

© All rights reserved Hourcade et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Nathan, Lisa P., Lake, Milli, Grey, Nell Carden, Nilsen, Trond, Utter, Robert F., Utter, Elizabeth J., Ring, Mark, Kahn, Zoe and Friedman, Batya (2011): Multi-lifespan information system design: investigating a new design approach in Rwanda. In: Proceedings of the 2011 iConference 2011. pp. 591-597.

In this paper we report on our research and design efforts to provide Rwandans with access to and reuse of video interviews discussing the failures and successes of the United Nations International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda (UN-ICTR). We describe our general approach and report on three case studies with diverse sectors of Rwandan society: governmental information centres, youth clubs, and a grassroots organization working with victims of sexual violence. Our work includes the development and application of five indicators to assess the success and limitations of our approach: diverse stakeholders; diverse uses; on-going use; cultural, linguistic and geographic reach; and Rwandan initiative. This work makes three important contributions: first, it offers the information field a design approach for use in post-conflict situations; second, it provides near-term evaluation indicators as an initial set others can build from and extend; third, it describes the first empirical explorations of the multi-lifespan information system design research approach.

© All rights reserved Nathan et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Czeskis, Alexei, Dermendjieva, Ivayla, Yapit, Hussein, Borning, Alan, Friedman, Batya, Gill, Brian and Kohno, Tadayoshi (2010): Parenting from the pocket: value tensions and technical directions for secure and private parent-teen mobile safety. In: Proceedings of the 2010 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2010. p. 15.

An increasing number of high-tech devices, such as driver monitoring systems and Internet usage monitoring tools, are advertised as useful or even necessary for good parenting of teens. Simultaneously, there is a growing market for mobile "personal safety" devices. As these trends merge, there will be significant implications for parent-teen relationships, affecting domains such as privacy, trust, and maturation. Not only the teen and his or her parents are affected; other important stakeholders include the teen's friends who may be unwittingly monitored. This problem space, with less clear-cut assets, risks, and affected parties, thus lies well outside of more typical computer security applications. To help understand this problem domain and what, if anything, should be built, we turn to the theory and methods of Value Sensitive Design, a systematic approach to designing for human values in technology. We first develop value scenarios that highlight potential issues, benefits, harms, and challenges. We then conducted semi-structured interviews with 18 participants (9 teens and their parents). Results show significant differences with respect to information about: 1) internal state (e.g., mood) versus external environment (e.g., location) state; 2) situation (e.g., emergency vs. non-emergency); and 3) awareness (e.g., notification vs. non-notification). The value scenario and interview results positioned us to identify key technical challenges -- such as strongly protecting the privacy of a teen's contextual information during ordinary situations but immediately exposing that information to others as appropriate in an emergency -- and corresponding architectural levers for these technologies. In addition to laying a foundation for future work in this area, this research serves as a prototypical example of using Value Sensitive Design to explicate the underlying human values in complex security domains.

© All rights reserved Czeskis et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Denning, Tamara, Borning, Alan, Friedman, Batya, Gill, Brian T., Kohno, Tadayoshi and Maisel, William H. (2010): Patients, pacemakers, and implantable defibrillators: human values and security for wireless implantable medical devices. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 917-926.

Implantable medical devices (IMDs) improve patients' quality of life and help sustain their lives. In this study, we explore patient views and values regarding their devices to inform the design of computer security for wireless IMDs. We interviewed 13 individuals with implanted cardiac devices. Key questions concerned the evaluation of 8 mockups of IMD security systems. Our results suggest that some systems that are technically viable are nonetheless undesirable to patients. Patients called out a number of values that affected their attitudes towards the systems, including perceived security, safety, freedom from unwanted cultural and historical associations, and self-image. In our analysis, we extend the Value Sensitive Design value dams and flows technique in order to suggest multiple, complementary systems; in our discussion, we highlight some of the usability, regulatory, and economic complexities that arise from offering multiple options. We conclude by offering design guidelines for future security systems for IMDs.

© All rights reserved Denning et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Friedman, Batya and Nathan, Lisa P. (2010): Multi-lifespan information system design: a research initiative for the hci community. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2243-2246.

This CHI Note proposes a new research initiative for the HCI community: multi-lifespan information system design. The central idea begins with the identification of categories of problems that are unlikely to be solved within a single human lifespan. Three such categories are proposed: limitations of the human psyche, limitations of the structure of society, and slower moving natural time-scales. We then examine possible opportunities and roles for information systems to help construct longer-term solutions to such problems and, in turn, identify key challenges for such systems. Finally, we conclude by discussing significant real world problems that would benefit from a multi-lifespan design approach and point to open questions. This CHI Note's key contribution entails the articulation of a promising new research initiative for the HCI community.

© All rights reserved Friedman and Nathan and/or their publisher

 
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Friedman, Batya, Nathan, Lisa P., Lake, Milli, Grey, Nell Carden, Nilsen, Trond T., Utter, Robert F., Utter, Elizabeth J., Ring, Mark and Kahn, Zoe (2010): Multi-lifespan information system design in post-conflict societies: an evolving project in Rwanda. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2833-2842.

In this paper we report on our early-stage research and design efforts to provide Rwandans with access to and reuse of video interviews from the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda. More generally, we investigate methods and designs that can be deployed successfully within a post-conflict political climate concerned about recurring violence. This work: (1) directly supports the Rwandan people in their efforts to achieve justice, healing and reconciliation; (2) provides the HCI community with methods and approaches for undertaking design in post-conflict situations; and (3) describes the first empirical exploration of multi-lifespan information system design.

© All rights reserved Friedman et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Nathan, Lisa P. and Friedman, Batya (2010): Interacting with policy in a political world: reflections from the voices from the Rwanda Tribunal project. In Interactions, 17 (5) pp. 56-59.

2009
 
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Nathan, Lisa, Friedman, Batya and Hendry, Dave (2009): Information system design as catalyst: human action and environmental sustainability. In Interactions, 16 (4) pp. 6-11.

 
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Melson, Gail F., Jr., Peter H. Kahn, Beck, Alan, Friedman, Batya, Roberts, Trace, Garrett, Erik and Gill, Brian T. (2009): Children's behavior toward and understanding of robotic and living dogs. In Journal of Applied Developmental Psychology, 30 (2) pp. 92-102.

This study investigated children's reasoning about and behavioral interactions with a computationally sophisticated robotic dog (Sony's AIBO) compared to a live dog (an Australian Shepherd). Seventy-two children from three age groups (79 years, 1012 years, and 1315 years) participated in this study. Results showed that more children conceptualized the live dog, as compared to AIBO, as having physical essences, mental states, sociality, and moral standing. Children also spent more time touching and within arms distance of the live dog, as compared to AIBO. However, a surprising majority of children conceptualized and interacted with AIBO in ways that were like a live dog. For example, over 60% of the children affirmed that AIBO had mental states, sociality, and moral standing; and children were as likely to give AIBO commands as a living dog. Discussion broaches whether it is possible that a new technological genre is emerging that challenges traditional ontological categories.

© All rights reserved Melson et al. and/or Elsevier

 Cited in the following chapter:

Human-Robot Interaction: [/encyclopedia/human-robot_interaction.html]


 
2008
 
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Nathan, Lisa P., Blevis, Eli, Friedman, Batya, Hasbrouck, Jay and Sengers, Phoebe (2008): Beyond the hype: sustainability & HCI. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 2273-2276.

In this panel we explore: (1) the burgeoning discourse on sustainability concerns within HCI, (2) the material and behavioral challenges of sustainability in relation to interaction design, (3) the benefits and risks involved in labeling a project or product as environmentally sustainable, and (4) implications of taking on (or ignoring) sustainability as a research, design, and teaching topic for HCI.

© All rights reserved Nathan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Nathan, Lisa P., Friedman, Batya, Klasjna, Pedja V., Kane, Shaun K. and Miller, Jessica K. (2008): Envisioning Systemic Effects on Persons and Society Throughout Interactive System Design. In: Proceedsing of the ACM Conference on Designing Interactive Systems 2008, Cape Town, South Africa. p. 10.

 
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Nathan, Lisa P., Friedman, Batya, Klasnja, Predrag, Kane, Shaun K. and Miller, Jessica K. (2008): Envisioning systemic effects on persons and society throughout interactive system design. In: Proceedings of DIS08 Designing Interactive Systems 2008. pp. 1-10.

The design, development, and deployment of interactive systems can substantively impact individuals, society, and the natural environment, now and potentially well into the future. Yet, a scarcity of methods exists to support long-term, emergent, systemic thinking in interactive design practice. Toward addressing this gap, we propose four envisioning criteria -- stakeholders, time, values, and pervasiveness -- distilled from prior work in urban planning, design noir, and Value Sensitive Design. We characterize how the criteria can support systemic thinking, illustrate the integration of the envisioning criteria into established design practice (scenario-based design), and provide strategic activities to serve as generative envisioning tools. We conclude with suggestions for use and future work. Key contributions include: 1) four envisioning criteria to support systemic thinking, 2) value scenarios (extending scenario-based design), and 3) strategic activities for engaging the envisioning criteria in interactive system design practice.

© All rights reserved Nathan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hendry, David G. and Friedman, Batya (2008): Theories and practice of design for information systems: eight design perspectives in ten short weeks. In: Proceedings of DIS08 Designing Interactive Systems 2008. pp. 435-444.

Students come to design education with different goals. Some seek to acquire expertise in design, others to learn specialized methods tailored to a research domain. Furthermore, students in the area of information system design confront a large literature of diverse perspectives on design, all of which are potentially useful. To disentangle this literature and to develop students' knowledge and know-how for design, a ten-week course, titled Theories and Practice of Design for Information Systems, was developed. Pedagogically, this introductory course is neither a studio course nor a methods course. Instead, it takes a "design perspectives" approach where students engage a number of substantial perspectives on design through conceptual and experiential study. This paper introduces this pedagogical approach and describes eight design perspectives including readings, key questions, and activities. It concludes with lessons learned for positioning students to engage the interplay between the theory and practice of information system design.

© All rights reserved Hendry and Friedman and/or ACM Press

 
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Friedman, Batya, Hook, Kristina, Gill, Brian, Eidmar, Lina, Prien, Catherine Sallmander and Severson, Rachel (2008): Personlig integritet: a comparative study of perceptions of privacy in public places in Sweden and the United States. In: Proceedings of the Fifth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2008. pp. 142-151.

In this paper we report on a cross-cultural study of people's judgments about privacy in public places. Replicating and extending a previously published study conducted in the US, 350 surveys and 30 interviews were conducted on a university campus in a major city in Sweden. Participants were recruited on campus while walking through a major public through fare which was being captured by a video camera and displayed in real-time in a room in a campus building overlooking the area. We analyze the Swedish data alone and also report comparative analyses with the previously published US data. Results showed in general Swedes are substantially more concerned about privacy in public places than their counterparts in the US. In both countries, women generally expressed more concern than men, but this gender gap was greater in the US than Sweden. Discussion focuses on cross-cultural perspectives on privacy in public and implications for interaction design.

© All rights reserved Friedman et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Friedman, Batya, Freier, Nathan G., Kahn, Peter H., Lin, Peyina and Sodeman, Robin (2008): Office window of the future? -- Field-based analyses of a new use of a large display. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 20 (6) pp. 452-465.

We installed large plasma displays on the walls of seven inside offices of faculty and staff at a university, and displayed, as the default image, real-time HDTV views of the immediate outside scene. Then, utilizing a field-study methodology, data were collected over a 16-week period to explore the user experience with these large display windows. Through the triangulation of data -- 652 pages of interview transcripts, journal entries, and responses to email inquiries -- results showed that users deeply appreciated many aspects of their experience. Benefits included a reported increase in users' connection to the wider social community, connection to the natural world, psychological wellbeing, and cognitive functioning. Users also integrated the large display window into their workplace practice. However, users expressed concerns particularly about the impacts on the privacy of people whose images were captured in the public place by the HDTV camera. Discussion focuses on design challenges for future investigations into related uses of large displays.

© All rights reserved Friedman et al. and/or Academic Press

2007
 
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Miller, Jessica K., Friedman, Batya and Jancke, Gavin (2007): Value tensions in design: the value sensitive design, development, and appropriation of a corporation's groupware system. In: GROUP07: International Conference on Supporting Group Work 2007. pp. 281-290.

We report on the value sensitive design, development, and appropriation of a groupware system to support software engineering knowledge sharing. Usage data (5,965 visitors) and semi-structured interviews (18 individuals) suggest the methods employed were successful in addressing value tensions, particularly with respect to privacy, awareness, and reputation. Key contributions include: (1) "proof-of-concept" that established Value Sensitive Design principles and methods can be used to good effect for the design of groupware in an industry setting, (2) a new design method for addressing value tensions, Value Dams and Flows, and (3) demonstration of the co-evolution of technology and organizational policy.

© All rights reserved Miller et al. and/or ACM Press

2006
 
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Friedman, Batya, Kahn, Peter H., Hagman, Jennifer, Severson, Rachel L. and Gill, Brian (2006): The Watcher and the Watched: Social Judgments About Privacy in a Public Place. In Human-Computer Interaction, 21 (2) pp. 235-272.

Digitally capturing and displaying real-time images of people in public places raises concerns for individual privacy. Applying principles of Value Sensitive Design, we conducted two studies of people's social judgments about this topic. In Study I, 750 people were surveyed as they walked through a public plaza that was being captured by a HDTV camera and displayed in real-time in the office of a building overlooking the plaza. In Study II, 120 individuals were interviewed about the same topic. Moreover, Study II controlled for whether the participant was a direct stakeholder of the technology (inside the office watching people on the HDTV large-plasma display window) or an indirect stakeholder (being watched in the public venue). Taking both studies together, results showed the following: (a) the majority of participants upheld some modicum of privacy in public; (b) people's privacy judgments were not a one-dimensional construct, but often involved considerations based on physical harm, psychological wellbeing, and informed consent; and (c) more women than men expressed concerns about the installation, and, unlike the men, equally brought forward their concerns whether they were The Watcher or The Watched.

© All rights reserved Friedman et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Friedman, Batya, Smith, Ian E., Jr., Peter H. Kahn, Consolvo, Sunny and Selawski, Jaina (2006): Development of a Privacy Addendum for Open Source Licenses: Value Sensitive Design in Industry. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) UbiComp 2006 Ubiquitous Computing - 8th International Conference September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 194-211.

 
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Davis, Janet, Lin, Peyina, Borning, Alan, Friedman, Batya, Jr., Peter H. Kahn and Waddell, Paul (2006): Simulations for Urban Planning: Designing for Human Values. In IEEE Computer, 39 (9) pp. 66-72.

2005
 
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Melson, Gail F., Kahn, Peter H., Beck, Alan M., Friedman, Batya, Roberts, Trace and Garrett, Erik (2005): Robots as dogs?: children's interactions with the robotic dog AIBO and a live Australian shepherd. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1649-1652.

This study investigated the interactions of 72 children (ages 7 to 15) with Sony's robotic dog AIBO in comparison to a live Australian Shepherd dog. Results showed that more children conceptualized the live dog, as compared to AIBO, as having physical essences, mental states, sociality, and moral standing. Based on behavioral analyses, children also spent more time touching and within arms distance of the live dog, as compared to AIBO. That said, a surprising majority of children conceptualized and interacted with AIBO in ways that were like a live dog. Discussion focuses on two questions. First, is it possible that a new technological genre is emerging in HCI that challenges traditional ontological categories (e.g., between animate and inanimate)? Second, are pervasive interactions with a wide array of "robotic others" -- increasingly sophisticated personified computational artifacts that mimic biological forms and pull psychologically in mental, social, and moral ways -- a good thing for human beings.

© All rights reserved Melson et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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Jr, Peter H. Kahn,, Friedman, Batya, Perez-Granados, Deanne R. and Freier, Nathan G. (2004): Robotic pets in the lives of preschool children. In: CHI 04 Extended Abstracts on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 1449-1452.

This study examined preschool children's reasoning about and behavioral interactions with one of the most advanced robotic pets currently on the retail market, Sony's robotic dog AIBO. Eighty children, equally divided between two age groups, 34-50 months and 58-74 months, participated in individual sessions that included play with and an interview about two artifacts: AIBO and a stuffed dog. Results showed similarities in children's reasoning about the two artifacts, but differences in their behavioral interactions. Discussion focuses on how robotic pets, as representative of an emerging technological genre in HCI, may be (a) blurring foundational ontological categories, and (b) impacting children's social and moral development. More broadly, results inform on our understanding of the human-robotic relationship.

© All rights reserved Jr et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Human-Robot Interaction: [/encyclopedia/human-robot_interaction.html]


 
2003
 
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Friedman, Batya, Kahn, Peter H. and Hagman, Jennifer (2003): Hardware companions?: what online AIBO discussion forums reveal about the human-robotic relationship. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 273-280.

2002
 
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Friedman, Batya, Howe, Daniel C. and Felten, Edward W. (2002): Informed Consent in the Mozilla Browser: Implementing Value Sensitive Design. In: HICSS 2002 2002. p. 247.

2001
 
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Millett, Lynette I., Friedman, Batya and Felten, Edward (2001): Cookies and Web Browser Design: Toward Realizing Informed Consent Online. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 46-52.

We first provide criteria for assessing informed consent online. Then we examine how cookie technology and Web browser designs have responded to concerns about informed consent. Specifically, we document relevant design changes in Netscape Navigator and Internet Explorer over a 5-year period, starting in 1995. Our retrospective analyses leads us to conclude that while cookie technology has improved over time regarding informed consent, some startling problems remain. We specify six of these problems and offer design remedies. This work fits within the emerging field of Value-Sensitive Design.

© All rights reserved Millett et al. and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Friedman, Batya and Jr., Peter H. Kahn (2000): New directions: a value-sensitive design approach to augmented reality. In: Designing Augmented Reality Environments 2000 2000. pp. 163-164.

 
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Friedman, Batya, Jr., Peter H. Kahn and Howe, Daniel C. (2000): Trust online. In Communications of the ACM, 43 (12) pp. 34-40.

 
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Friedman, Batya, Felten, Edward and Millett, Lynette I. (2000): Informed Consent Online: A Conceptual Model and Design Principles. In , .

We provide a conceptual model of informed consent online.  This model is based on five components: disclosure, comprehension, voluntariness, competence, and agreement. We examine how these components play out in a wide range of online interactions.  Moreover, we call attentiontothecriticalroleofWebbrowsersinthis endeavor. Finally we offer eight design principles for realizing informed consent online. This work fits within the emerging field of Value-Sensitive Design.

© All rights reserved Friedman et al. and/or their publisher

1998
 
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Friedman, Batya (1998): User Autonomy: Who Should Control What and When?. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (1) pp. 26-29.

Autonomy is fundamental to human flourishing and self-development (Gewirth, 1978; Hill, 1991). If we also accept that technology can promote human values (Friedman, 1997; Winner, 1985), then an important question emerges: How can we design technology to enhance user autonomy? In this workshop, we addressed this question. We built on the organizers' previous framework for understanding user autonomy (1) to analyze participants' research and design experiences of user autonomy in system design, (2) to characterize designs that support user autonomy, and (3) to identify design methods to enhance user autonomy. We report on those activities here.

© All rights reserved Friedman and/or ACM Press

1996
 
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Friedman, Batya (1996): Value-Sensitive Design. In Interactions, 3 (6) pp. 16-23.

 
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Friedman, Batya and Nissenbaum, Helen (1996): Bias in Computer Systems. In ACM Transactions on Information Systems, 14 (3) pp. 330-347.

From an analysis of actual cases, three categories of bias in computer systems have been developed: preexisting, technical, and emergent. Preexisting bias has its roots in social institutions, practices, and attitudes. Technical bias arises from technical constraints of considerations. Emergent bias arises in a context of use. Although others have pointed to bias in particular computer systems and have noted the general problem, we know of no comparable work that examines this phenomenon comprehensively and which offers a framework for understanding and remedying it. We conclude by suggesting that freedom from bias should by counted among the select set of criteria -- including reliability, accuracy, and efficiency -- according to which the quality of systems in use in society should be judged.

© All rights reserved Friedman and Nissenbaum and/or ACM Press

 
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Friedman, Batya, Brok, Eric, Roth, Susan King and Thomas, John (1996): Minimizing Bias in Computer Systems. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (1) pp. 48-51.

1994
 
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Friedman, Batya and Jr., Peter H. Kahn (1994): Educating Computer Scientists: Linking the Social and Technical. In Communications of the ACM, 37 (1) pp. 64-70.

 
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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/batya_friedman.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1994-2012
Pub. count:34
Number of co-authors:67



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Lisa P. Nathan:7
Peter H. Kahn Jr.:6
Peter H. Kahn:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Batya Friedman's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Ben Shneiderman:225
Kristina Hook:58
Eli Blevis:36
 
 
 

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