Publication statistics

Pub. period:2007-2012
Pub. count:22
Number of co-authors:40



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Manfred Tscheligi:18
Roland Buchner:4
Regina Bernhaupt:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Astrid Weiss's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Manfred Tscheligi:105
Volker Wulf:55
Vanessa Evers:34
 
 
 
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Astrid Weiss

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Publications by Astrid Weiss (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Tscheligi, Manfred, Meschtscherjakov, Alexander, Weiss, Astrid, Wulf, Volker, Evers, Vanessa and Mutlu, Bilge (2012): Exploring collaboration in challenging environments: from the car to the factory and beyond. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 15-16.

We propose a daylong workshop at CSCW2012 on the topic collaboration in challenging and difficult environments, which are to our understanding all contexts, which go beyond traditional working/office settings topic. Examples for these environments can be the automotive context or the context of a semiconductor factory, which show very specific contextual conditions and therefore offer special research challenges: How to address all passengers in the car, not only the driver? How to explore operator tasks in a cleanroom? How could the long-term (social) collaboration of robots and humans be investigated in privacy critical environments?

© All rights reserved Tscheligi et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Kluckner, Patricia M., Buchner, Roland, Weiss, Astrid and Tscheligi, Manfred (2012): Repair now: collaboration between maintainers, operators and equipment in a cleanroom. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 143-146.

It is greatly acknowledged in the CSCW community that supportive technology needs to adapt to its contextual usage to increase the collaboration between different user groups. Based on a Contextual Inquiry (CI) in the cleanroom in a semiconductor factory, we identified the maintainers working routines and their usage patterns with various maintenance devices. In the cleanroom maintainance tools could bridge the physical gap between operators and maintainers. In particular reporting tools should link the information gap. In this paper we will present design implications derived from the CI towards a novel-reporting tool for maintainers to support this cooperation between maintainers and operators in the cleanroom.

© All rights reserved Kluckner et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Buchner, Roland, Wurhofer, Daniela, Weiss, Astrid and Tscheligi, Manfred (2012): User experience of industrial robots over time. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction 2012. pp. 115-116.

This paper reports about a User Experience (UX) study on industrial robotic arms in the context of a semiconductor factory cleanroom. The goal was to find out (1) if there is a difference in the UX between robots used over years with a strict security perimeter (robot A) and a newly installed robot without security perimeter (robot B), and (2) if the UX ratings of the new robot change over time. Therefore, a UX questionnaire was developed and handed out to the operators working with these robots. The first survey was conducted one week after the deployment of robot B (n=23), the second survey (n=21) six months later. Thereby, we found that time is crucial for experiencing human-robot interaction. Our results showed an improvement between the first and second measurement of UX regarding robot B. Although robot A was significantly better rated than robot B in terms of usability, general UX, cooperation, and stress, we assume that the differences in UX will decrease gradually with prolonged interaction.

© All rights reserved Buchner et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Sardar, Aziez, Joosse, Michiel, Weiss, Astrid and Evers, Vanessa (2012): Don't stand so close to me: users' attitudinal and behavioral responses to personal space invasion by robots. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction 2012. pp. 229-230.

When in a human environment, one might expect that a social robot would act according to the social norms people expect of each other. When someone does not adhere to a prevalent social norm, people usually feel threatened and disturbed. Thus, insight is needed into what is perceived as socially normative behavior for robots. We conducted an experiment in which an agent approached a participant in order to determine the effect of personal space invasion. We manipulated the agent-type (human/robot) and the approach speed (slow/fast) of the agent towards the participant. Unexpectedly, our results show that the participants displayed more compensatory behavior in the robot condition than in the human condition. We consider this response toward personal space invasion as indication that people react in a similar way to robots as they do to humans, however with more intensity.

© All rights reserved Sardar et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Strasser, Ewald, Weiss, Astrid and Tscheligi, Manfred (2012): Affect misattribution procedure: an implicit technique to measure user experience in hri. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction 2012. pp. 243-244.

This paper suggests new methodology for measuring User Experience in HRI. We suggest using implicit attitude to predict User Experience (Affect). Therefore we show a first validation study. The study uses short videos of a robot (IURO -- Interactive Urban Robot) approaching a person and asking for the. IURO either approached a walking or a standing person. We measured people's implicit attitude towards the robot with the Affect Misattribution Procedure (AMP). The results show that a walking person being approached by the robot evolves an implicitly more negative attitude in the observing participant whereas corresponding questionnaire items showed no difference in attitude for the approach behaviour. We conclude from these results that measuring implicit attitude in HRI is valuable for the evaluation of the User Experience of a robot.

© All rights reserved Strasser et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Weiss, Astrid (2012): HRI research: the interdisciplinary challenge or the dawning of the discipline?. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction 2012. pp. 271-272.

The Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) research field has developed more and more over the past 10 to 20 years. It is still a relatively young community, which is in the process of developing its characteristics, such as being interdisciplinary, innovative, responsible, technical, and many others. Similarly, like in the development of the Human-Computer Interaction (HCI) community, being interdisciplinary is essential, but if we have a look on the current situation, HCI became more of an autonomous discipline nowadays. Where is the HRI community heading to in this respect? This paper should reflect in accordance to the "epistemic living spaces" concept on some stereotypical statements by researchers working in HRI. The reflection shows that in three phases of a researcher's career (orientation, positioning, and stabilizing and expanding) show a tendency towards the discipline and away from interdisciplinary work and that the forth phase (attachment) needs to be strengthened, independently of disciplinary or interdisciplinary approaches.

© All rights reserved Weiss and/or his/her publisher

 
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Z<roke;otowski, Jakub A., Weiss, Astrid and Tscheligi, Manfred (2012): Navigating in public space: participants' evaluation of a robot's approach behavior. In: Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction 2012. pp. 283-284.

The results from an empirical study on the impact of a robot's approach trajectories on its social acceptance are presented. An online survey presenting short videos of a robot (IURO -- Interactive Urban RObot) approaching a person in a public space and asking for help was shown to the users. IURO either approached a walking or standing person. The results show that walking participants preferred to be approached from the front left or front right direction rather than frontally. However, when they are standing all three approach directions were acceptable.

© All rights reserved Z<roke;otowski et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Weiss, Astrid, Dijk, Betsy van and Evers, Vanessa (2012): Knowing me knowing you: exploring effects of culture and context on perception of robot personality. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Intercultural Collaboration 2012. pp. 133-136.

We carry out a set of experiments to assess collaboration between human users and robots in a cross-cultural setting. This paper describes the study design and deployment of a video-based study to investigate task-dependence and cultural-background dependence of the personality trait attribution on a socially interactive robot. In Human-Robot Interaction, as well as in Human-Agent Interaction research, the attribution of personality traits towards intelligent agents has already been researched intensively in terms of the social similarity or complementary rule. We assume that searching the explanation for personality trait attribution in the similarity and complementary rule does not take into account important contextual factors. Just like people equate certain personality types to certain professions, we expect that people may have certain personality expectations depending on the context of the task the robot carries out. Because professions have different social meaning in different national culture, we also expect that these task-dependent personality preferences differ across cultures. Therefore, we suggest an experiment that considers the task-context and the cultural-background of users.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Kollar, Thomas, Weiss, Astrid, Monast, Jason, Austermann, Anja, Lu, David, Patel, Mitesh, Gribovskaya, Elena, Datta, Chandan, Kelley, Richard, Osawa, Hirotaka and Lin, Lanny (2011): HRI pioneers workshop 2011. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2011. pp. 9-10.

The 2011 HRI Pioneers Workshop will be conducted in conjunction with the 2011 ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human-Robot Interaction (HRI). The 2011 HRI Pioneers Workshop will provide a forum for graduate students and postdocs to learn about the current state of HRI, to present their work and to network with one another and with select senior researchers in a setting that is less formal and more interactive than the main conference. Workshop participants will discuss important issues and open challenges in the field, encouraging the formation of collaborative relationships across disciplines and geographic boundaries.

© All rights reserved Kollar et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Buchner, Roland, Weiss, Astrid and Tscheligi, Manfred (2011): Development of a context model based on video analysis. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2011. pp. 117-118.

This paper reports on the analysis of video footage of a human-robot study in public place regarding context factors that significantly influence the interaction. Therefore, a coding scheme was developed which was later used to analyze the video footage of the human-robot study. To ensure the validity of the coding, the video footage was coded independently by two students and afterwards the Cohen's Kappa was calculated to ensure the intercoder reliability. This calculation served as a basis for the creation of the first context model which shows factors that influence the interaction. This approach could show that it is possible to extract valid context factors and to create a context model based on video annotation. These factors should then be further tested in lab-based studies to get a better understanding of how they affect the human-robot interaction.

© All rights reserved Buchner et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Förster, Florian, Weiss, Astrid and Tscheligi, Manfred (2011): Anthropomorphic design for an interactive urban robot: the right design approach. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2011. pp. 137-138.

The paper presents the first step of a user-centered design process for a robot designated to operate in urban public space. A participatory design workshop was conducted to challenge the anthropomorphic design approach assumed by the designers and elicit user requirements for the design. In contrast to the expectations, the results show a tendency towards a preference of a non-anthropomorphic design.

© All rights reserved Förster et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Mirnig, Nicole, Weiss, Astrid and Tscheligi, Manfred (2011): A communication structure for human-robot itinerary requests. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2011. pp. 205-206.

To analyze the formula for success of human communication, we examined dialogs between human interactors who were asking for directions in public place and extracted those elements that are responsible for making a dialog succeed or fail. Then, we tried to rate the elements according to the grade of their influence. Based on this rating and on the Shannon&Weaver model of communication, we created a communication structure for successful human-robot communication on which further research may be based to make human-robot communication as effective as possible.

© All rights reserved Mirnig et al. and/or their publisher

2010
 
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Weiss, Astrid, Igelsböck, Judith, Tscheligi, Manfred, Bauer, Andrea, Kühnlenz, Kolja, Wollherr, Dirk and Buss, Martin (2010): Robots asking for directions: the willingness of passers-by to support robots. In: Proceedings of the 5th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2010. pp. 23-30.

This paper reports about a human-robot interaction field trial conducted with the autonomous mobile robot ACE (Autonomous City Explorer) in a public place, where the ACE robot needs the support of human passers-by to find its way to a target location. Since the robot does not possess any prior map knowledge or GPS support, it has to acquire missing information through interaction with humans. The robot thus has to initiate communication by asking for the way, and retrieves information from passers-by showing the way by gestures (pointing) and marking goal positions on a still image on the touch screen of the robot. The aims of the field trial where threefold: (1) Investigating the aptitude of the navigation architecture, (2) Evaluating the intuitiveness of the interaction concept for the passers-by, (3) Assessing people's willingness to support the ACE robot in its task, i.e. assessing the social acceptability. The field trial demonstrates that the architecture enables successful autonomous path finding without any prior map knowledge just by route directions given by passers-by. An additional street survey and observational data moreover attests the intuitiveness of the interaction paradigm and the high acceptability of the ACE robot in the public place.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Weiss, Astrid, Wurhofer, Daniela, Lankes, Michael and Tscheligi, Manfred (2009): Autonomous vs. tele-operated: how people perceive human-robot collaboration with hrp-2. In: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2009. pp. 257-258.

Effective collaboration between robots and humans is not only a question of interface design and usability, but also of user experience and social acceptance. To investigate these aspects for Human-Robot Collaboration with the HRP-2 robot, two video-based focus groups enhanced with creative stimuli were conducted. The following research question was addressed: Is the HRP-2 robot perceived differently in an autonomous collaboration condition compared to a tele-operated collaboration condition, in terms of social acceptance and user experience?"The results show that participants in general are open to a humanoid robot as working partner as long as there is a clear distinction between a human and a robot, in terms of tasks and working procedures. Furthermore, participants stated a positive attitude toward the remotely-controlled HRP-2 robot.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiss, Astrid, Buchner, Roland, Scherndl, Thomas and Tscheligi, Manfred (2009): I would choose the other card: humanoid robot gives an advice. In: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2009. pp. 259-260.

This article reports on a user study conducted to asses the credibility of a humanoid robot. The study set-up was based on the "Monty Hall Problem. Overall 13 people between the ages of 19 and 84 took part in the study (7 male and 6 female). The experiment was set up as a card-game where the participant had to guess which of the three cards shows a price. At one point of the experiment the robot advised the participant to change his/her mind and choose another card. During the user study the participants had to fill in a questionnaire on their level of certainty about their choice and the credibility of the robot. The results showed a significant correlation between the believability of the robot and the certainty in the decision made. Furthermore, the outcomes showed differences between participants who followed the robot's advise and participants who did not, regarding credibility, certainty of the decision made and the estimation whether the robot was helpful or not.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Weiss, Astrid, Scherndl, Thomas, Tscheligi, Manfred and Billard, Aude (2009): Evaluating the ICRA 2008 HRI challenge. In: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE International Conference on Human Robot Interaction 2009. pp. 261-262.

This paper reports on the evaluation of the ICRA 2008 Human-Robot Interaction (HRI) Challenge. Five research groups demonstrated state-of-the-art work on HRI with a special focus on social and learning abilities. The demonstrations were rated by expert evaluators, in charge of awarding the prize, and 269 participants, i.e. 20 percent of the conference attendees through a standardized questionnaire (semantic differential). The data was analyzed with respect to six independent variables: expert evaluators vs. attendees, nationality of participants, origin region of the demo, age, gender and knowledge level of the attendees. Conference attendees tended to give higher scores for Social Skills, General Impression, and Overall Score than the expert evaluators. Irrespectively of the level of knowledge, age, and gender, conference attendees rated all demos relatively homogeneously. However, a comparative analysis of the conference attendees's ratings nationality-wise showed that demonstrations were rated differently depending on the region of origin. Conference attendees for the USA and Asian countries tended to rate demos from the same country of origin more frequently and more positively.

© All rights reserved Weiss et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Wilfinger, David, Weiss, Astrid and Tscheligi, Manfred (2009): Exploring shopping information and navigation strategies with a mobile device. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 19.

In this article a field trial is presented that explores shopping information and navigation strategies and evaluates if the spectacles camera is beneficial as mobile device for this research context. The spectacles camera, a small camera installed in a pair of glasses, was used as exploration instrument in a shopping mall where passers-by could take part in a field trial on a voluntary basis. The goal of the field trial was twofold: 1.) Gaining insights on shoppers' behavior. 2.) Investigating the feasibility of the spectacles camera as exploration instrument. The field trial gave insights on navigation patterns and constituting elements of interest points of participants' shopping behavior, while the spectacles camera proved its value for investigating shopping strategies in the field.

© All rights reserved Wilfinger et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Bernhaupt, Regina, Wilfinger, David, Weiss, Astrid and Tscheligi, Manfred (2008): An Ethnographic Study on Recommendations in the Living Room: Implications for the Design of iTV Recommender Systems. In: Tscheligi, Manfred, Obrist, Marianna and Lugmayr, Artur (eds.) 6th European Conference - EuroITV 2008 July 3-4, 2008, Salzburg, Austria. pp. 92-101.

 
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Lankes, Michael, Riegler, Stefan, Weiss, Astrid, Mirlacher, Thomas, Pirker, Michael and Tscheligi, Manfred (2008): Facial expressions as game input with different emotional feedback conditions. In: Inakage, Masa and Cheok, Adrian David (eds.) Proceedings of the International Conference on Advances in Computer Entertainment Technology - ACE 2008 December 3-5, 2008, Yokohama, Japan. pp. 253-256.

 
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Bernhaupt, Regina, Obrist, Marianna, Weiss, Astrid, Beck, Elke and Tscheligi, Manfred (2008): Trends in the living room and beyond: results from ethnographic studies using creative and playful probing. In Computers in Entertainment, 6 (1) .

2007
 
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Bernhaupt, Regina, Obrist, Marianna, Weiss, Astrid, Beck, Elke and Tscheligi, Manfred (2007): Trends in the Living Room and Beyond. In: Cesar, Pablo, Chorianopoulos, Konstantinos and Jensen, Jens F. (eds.) 5th European Conference on Interactive TV - EuroITV 2007 May 24-25, 2007, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 146-155.

 
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Bernhaupt, Regina, Weiss, Astrid, Obrist, Marianna and Tscheligi, Manfred (2007): Playful Probing: Making Probing More Fun. In: Baranauskas, Maria Cecília Calani, Palanque, Philippe A., Abascal, Julio and Barbosa, Simone Diniz Junqueira (eds.) DEGAS 2007 - Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Design and Evaluation of e-Government Applications and Services September 11th, 2007, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil. pp. 606-619.

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/astrid_weiss.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:2007-2012
Pub. count:22
Number of co-authors:40



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Manfred Tscheligi:18
Roland Buchner:4
Regina Bernhaupt:4

 

 

Productive colleagues

Astrid Weiss's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Manfred Tscheligi:105
Volker Wulf:55
Vanessa Evers:34
 
 
 
Jul 23

Men have become the tools of their tools.

-- Henry David Thoreau

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!