Publication statistics

Pub. period:2006-2012
Pub. count:11
Number of co-authors:9



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

James D. Hollan:8
Nadir Weibel:4
Terry Winograd:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Anne Marie Piper's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Terry Winograd:59
James D. Hollan:49
Andreas Paepcke:43
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
Emotional Design: How to make products people will love
Starts TODAY LAST CALL!
go to course
UI Design Patterns for Successful Software
87% booked. Starts in 8 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Anne Marie Piper

 

Publications by Anne Marie Piper (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
Edit | Del

Piper, Anne Marie, Weibel, Nadir and Hollan, James D. (2012): A pen-based toolkit for authoring collaborative language activities. In: Companion Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 269-270. Available online

Hybrid paper-digital interfaces enabled by digital pens are a promising approach for supporting collaborative language, communication, and socialization activities. Digital pens enhance interaction with traditional paper content by playing and recording audio and recognizing handwriting and gestures. Currently, generating custom interactive paper documents involves some programming, limiting its use by many user groups (e.g., educators and families) who might especially benefit from application of hybrid paper-digital interfaces in their practices. To address this need, we developed an end-user Toolkit for Authoring Pen and Paper Language Activities (TAP&PLAY). End-users are able to quickly create custom interactive materials to support collocated interaction between children, teachers, and family members.

© All rights reserved Piper et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
Edit | Del

Piper, Anne Marie, Campbell, Ross and Hollan, James D. (2010): Exploring the accessibility and appeal of surface computing for older adult health care support. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 907-916. Available online

This paper examines accessibility issues of surface computing with older adults and explores the appeal of surface computing for health care support. We present results from a study involving 20 older adults (age 60 to 88) performing gesture-based interactions on a multitouch surface. Older adults were able to successfully perform all actions on the surface computer, but some gestures that required two fingers (resize) and fine motor movement (rotate) were problematic. Ratings for ease of use and ease of performing each action as well as time required to figure out an action were similar to that of younger adults. Older adults reported that the surface computer was less intimidating, less frustrating, and less overwhelming than a traditional computer. The idea of using a surface computer for health care support was well-received by participants. We conclude with a discussion of design issues involving surface computing for older adults and use of this technology for health care.

© All rights reserved Piper et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Piper, Anne Marie (2010): Supporting medical communication with a multimodal surface computer. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2899-2902. Available online

This research explores the utility of a multimodal surface computer for supporting medical communication between older adults and health care providers. Research involves a field study of health care communication practices, the design of a multimodal surface computer application, and an in-context evaluation of the technology at a local retirement community.

© All rights reserved Piper and/or his/her publisher

 
Edit | Del

Weibel, Nadir, Piper, Anne Marie and Hollan, James D. (2010): HIPerPaper: introducing pen and paper interfaces for ultra-scale wall displays. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 407-408. Available online

While recent advances in graphics, display, and computer hardware support ultra-scale visualizations of a tremendous amount of data sets, mechanisms for interacting with this information on large high-resolution wall displays are still under investigation. Different issues in terms of user interface, ergonomics, multi-user interaction, and system flexibility arise while facing ultra-scale wall displays and none of the introduced approaches fully address them. We introduce HIPerPaper, a novel digital pen and paper interface that enables natural interaction with the HIPerSpace wall, a 31.8 by 7.5 foot tiled wall display of 268,720,000 pixels. HIPerPaper provides a flexible, portable, and inexpensive medium for interacting with large high-resolution wall displays.

© All rights reserved Weibel et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Weibel, Nadir, Piper, Anne Marie and Hollan, James D. (2010): Exploring pen and paper interaction with high-resolution wall displays. In: Proceedings of the 2010 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2010. pp. 455-456. Available online

We introduce HIPerPaper, a novel digital pen and paper interface that enables natural interaction with a 31.8 by 7.5 foot tiled wall display of 268,720,000 pixels. HIPerPaper provides a flexible, portable, and inexpensive medium for interacting with large high-resolution wall displays. While the size and resolution of such displays allow visualization of data sets of a scale not previously possible, mechanisms for interacting with wall displays remain challenging. HIPerPaper enables multiple concurrent users to select, move, scale, and rotate objects on a high-dimension wall display.

© All rights reserved Weibel et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Piper, Anne Marie, Weibel, Nadir and Hollan, James D. (2010): Introducing Multimodal Paper-Digital Interfaces for Speech-Language Therapy. In: Proceedings of ASSETS 2010, 12th International ACM SIGACCESS Conference on Computers and Accessibility October, 2010, Orlando, FL, USA. .

After a stroke or brain injury, it may be more difficult to understand language and communicate with others. Speech-language therapy may help an individual regain language and cope with changes in their communication abilities. Our research examines the process of speech-language therapy with an emphasis on the practices of therapists working with adults with aphasia and apraxia of speech. This paper presents findings from field work undertaken to inform the design of a mixed paper-digital interface prototype using multimodal digital pens. We describe and analyze therapists' initial reactions to the system and present two case studies of use by older adults undergoing speech-language therapy. We discuss the utility of multimodal paper-digital interfaces to assist therapy and describe our vision of a system to help therapists independently create custom interactive paper materials for their clients.

© All rights reserved Piper et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
Edit | Del

Piper, Anne Marie and Hollan, James D. (2009): Tabletop displays for small group study: affordances of paper and digital materials. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1227-1236. Available online

In this paper we compare the affordances of presenting educational material on a tabletop display with presenting the same material using traditional paper handouts. Ten pairs of undergraduate students used digital or paper materials to prepare for exams during four one-hour study sessions over the course of a term. Students studying with the tabletop display solved problems on their own before resorting to answer keys and repeated activities more often than students studying with paper documents. We summarize study activities and discuss the benefits and drawbacks of each medium.

© All rights reserved Piper and Hollan and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Piper, Anne Marie and Hollan, James D. (2009): Analyzing Multimodal Communication around a Shared Tabletop Display. In: Proceedings of the 11th European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2009. pp. 283-302. Available online

Communication between people is inherently multimodal. People employ speech, facial expressions, eye gaze, and gesture, among other facilities, to support communication and cooperative activity. Complexity of communication increases when a person is without a modality such as hearing, often resulting in dependence on another person or an assistive device to facilitate communication. This paper examines communication about medical topics through Shared Speech Interface, a multimodal tabletop display designed to assist communication between a hearing and deaf individual by converting speech-to-text and representing dialogue history on a shared interactive display surface. We compare communication mediated by a multimodal tabletop display and by a human sign language interpreter. Results indicate that the multimodal tabletop display (1) allows the deaf patient to watch the doctor when she is speaking, (2) encourages the doctor to exploit multimodal communication such as co-occurring gesture-speech, and (3) provides shared access to persistent, collaboratively produced representations of conversation. We also describe extensions of this communication technology, discuss how multimodal analysis techniques are useful in understanding the affects of multiuser multimodal tabletop systems, and briefly allude to the potential of applying computer vision techniques to assist analysis.

© All rights reserved Piper and Hollan and/or their publisher

2008
 
Edit | Del

Piper, Anne Marie and Hollan, James D. (2008): Supporting medical conversations between deaf and hearing individuals with tabletop displays. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 147-156. Available online

This paper describes the design and evaluation of Shared Speech Interface (SSI), an application for an interactive multitouch tabletop display designed to facilitate medical conversations between a deaf patient and a hearing, non-signing physician. We employ a participatory design process involving members of the deaf community as well as medical and communication experts. We report results from an evaluation that compares conversation when facilitated by: (1) a digital table, (2) a human sign language interpreter, and (3) both a digital table and an interpreter. Our research reveals that tabletop displays have valuable properties for facilitating discussion between deaf and hearing individuals as well as enhancing privacy and independence. The contributions of this work include initial guidelines for cooperative group work technology for users with varying hearing abilities, discussion of benefits of participatory design with the deaf community, and lessons about using dictated speech on shared displays.

© All rights reserved Piper and Hollan and/or ACM Press

2006
 
Edit | Del

Piper, Anne Marie, O'Brien, Eileen, Morris, Meredith Ringel and Winograd, Terry (2006): SIDES: a cooperative tabletop computer game for social skills development. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW06 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2006. pp. 1-10. Available online

This paper presents a design case study of SIDES: Shared Interfaces to Develop Effective Social Skills. SIDES is a tool designed to help adolescents with Asperger's Syndrome practice effective group work skills using a four-player cooperative computer game that runs on tabletop technology. We present the design process and evaluation of SIDES conducted over six months with a middle school social group therapy class. Our findings indicate that cooperative tabletop computer games are a motivating and supportive tool for facilitating effective group work among our target population and reveal several design lessons to inform the development of similar systems.

© All rights reserved Piper et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Morris, Meredith Ringel, Cassanego, Anthony, Paepcke, Andreas, Winograd, Terry, Piper, Anne Marie and Huang, Anqi (2006): Mediating Group Dynamics through Tabletop Interface Design. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 26 (5) pp. 65-73. Available online

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/anne_marie_piper.html