Publication statistics

Pub. period:1997-2012
Pub. count:71
Number of co-authors:108



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Gregory D. Abowd:8
John Zimmerman:8
Scott Davidoff:8

 

 

Productive colleagues

Anind K. Dey's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gregory D. Abowd:116
Scott E. Hudson:113
Albrecht Schmidt:107
 
 
 

Upcoming Courses

go to course
User Experience: The Beginner's Guide
90% booked. Starts in 5 days
go to course
User-Centred Design - Module 2
89% booked. Starts in 6 days
 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities. 2nd Edition
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad
start reading
 
 
 
 
The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed.
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam
start reading
 
 

Anind K. Dey

Ph.D

Picture of Anind K. Dey.
Update pic
Has also published under the name of:
"Anind Dey"

Personal Homepage:
http://www.cs.cmu.edu/~anind/

Current place of employment:
Carnegie Mellon University

Anind K. Dey is an Associate Professor in the Human-Computer Interaction Institute at Carnegie Mellon University. His interests lie at the intersection of human-computer interaction, machine learning and ubiquitous computing. He has spent the last decade developing techniques for building context-aware applications, and for improving the usability of such applications. Anind is the author of over 100 articles in the area of ubiquitous computing, has served as the Program Chair for several conferences on ubiquitous computing and serves on the editorial board for IEEE Pervasive Computing and the Personal and Ubiquitous Computing Journal. Before joining Carnegie Mellon University, Anind was a Senior Researcher at Intel Research Berkeley and an Adjunct Assistant Professor at the University of California-Berkeley. He holds a PhD and a Masters degree in Computer Science, as well as a Masters degree in Aerospace Engineering, all from Georgia Tech, and a Bachelors of Computer Engineering from Simon Fraser University.

 

Publications by Anind K. Dey (bibliography)

 what's this?
2012
 
Edit | Del

Odom, William, Zimmerman, John, Davidoff, Scott, Forlizzi, Jodi, Dey, Anind K. and Lee, Min Kyung (2012): A fieldwork of the future with user enactments. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 338-347. Available online

Designing radically new technology systems that people will want to use is complex. Design teams must draw on knowledge related to people's current values and desires to envision a preferred yet plausible future. However, the introduction of new technology can shape people's values and practices, and what-we-know-now about them does not always translate to an effective guess of what the future could, or should, be. New products and systems typically exist outside of current understandings of technology and use paradigms; they often have few interaction and social conventions to guide the design process, making efforts to pursue them complex and risky. User Enactments (UEs) have been developed as a design approach that aids design teams in more successfully investigate radical alterations to technologies' roles, forms, and behaviors in uncharted design spaces. In this paper, we reflect on our repeated use of UE over the past five years to unpack lessons learned and further specify how and when to use it. We conclude with a reflection on how UE can function as a boundary object and implications for future work.

© All rights reserved Odom et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Fan, Chloe, Forlizzi, Jodi and Dey, Anind K. (2012): A spark of activity: exploring informative art as visualization for physical activity. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 81-84. Available online

In this note, we describe Spark, an informative art display that visualizes physical activity using abstract art. We present results from five deployments, lasting two to three weeks, that suggest that while graph visualizations are useful for information seeking, abstract visualizations are preferred for display purposes. Our results show that informative art is an appropriate way to visualize physical activity, and can be used in addition to graphs to increase enjoyment and engagement with physical activity displays.

© All rights reserved Fan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Gouin-Vallerand, Charles, Lim, Brian Y. and Dey, Anind K. (2012): Software provision in smart environment based on fuzzy logic intelligibility. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 774-777.

Ubiquitous applications and smart environment technologies are complex to deploy, manage and use. Intelligibility, in ubiquitous computing applications, explains to users what a system did (outputs) and why it did it (inputs or contextual information). Making software more intelligible can reduce the complexity of a system for users. This paper presents our work on an intelligibility strategy for fuzzy logic systems, applied to a context-aware software organization and service provision (SOSP) middleware for smart environments. This fuzzy logic intelligibility strategy has been evaluated and tested with two groups of real users (technical and less technical users), and two versions of our prototype (with and without intelligibility).

© All rights reserved Gouin-Vallerand et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Lim, Brian Y. and Dey, Anind K. (2012): Weights of evidence for intelligible smart environments. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 782-785.

Smart environments are improving their performance and services by increasingly using ubiquitous sensing and complex inference mechanisms. However, this comes at a cost of reduced intelligibility, user trust and control. The Intelligibility Toolkit was developed to support the automatic generation and provision of explanations to help users understand context-aware inference. We have extended the toolkit to generate explanations for a wider range of inference models and to provide two styles of explanations -- rule traces and weights of evidence. We describe explanations generated from several inference models for a smart home dataset for activity recognition. This demonstrates the versatility of using the Intelligibility Toolkit to retain explanatory capabilities across different inference models.

© All rights reserved Lim and Dey and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Shin, Choonsung, Hong, Jin-Hyuk and Dey, Anind K. (2012): Understanding and prediction of mobile application usage for smart phones. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 173-182. Available online

It is becoming harder to find an app on one's smart phone due to the increasing number of apps available and installed on smart phones today. We collect sensory data including app use from smart phones, to perform a comprehensive analysis of the context related to mobile app use, and build prediction models that calculate the probability of an app in the current context. Based on these models, we developed a dynamic home screen application that presents icons for the most probable apps on the main screen of the phone and highlights the most probable one. Our models outperformed other strategies, and, in particular, improved prediction accuracy by 8% over Most Frequently Used from 79.8% to 87.8% (for 9 candidate apps). Also, we found that the dynamic home screen improved accessibility to apps on the phone, compared to the conventional static home screen in terms of accuracy, required touch input and app selection time.

© All rights reserved Shin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Hong, Jin-Hyuk, Ramos, Julian and Dey, Anind K. (2012): Understanding physiological responses to stressors during physical activity. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 270-279. Available online

With advances in physiological sensors, we are able to understand people's physiological status and recognize stress to provide beneficial services. Despite the great potential in physiological stress recognition, there are some critical issues that need to be addressed such as the sensitivity and variability of physiology to many factors other than stress (e.g., physical activity). To resolve these issues, in this paper, we focus on the understanding of physiological responses to both stressor and physical activity and perform stress recognition, particularly in situations having multiple stimuli: physical activity and stressors. We construct stress models that correspond to individual situations, and we validate our stress modeling in the presence of physical activity. Analysis of our experiments provides an understanding on how physiological responses change with different stressors and how physical activity confounds stress recognition with physiological responses. In both objective and subjective settings, the accuracy of stress recognition drops by more than 14% when physical activity is performed. However, by modularizing stress models with respect to physical activity, we can recognize stress with accuracies of 82% (objective stress) and 87% (subjective stress), achieving more than a 5-10% improvement from approaches that do not take physical activity into account.

© All rights reserved Hong et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Marcu, Gabriela, Dey, Anind K. and Kiesler, Sara (2012): Parent-driven use of wearable cameras for autism support: a field study with families. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 401-410. Available online

Recorded images of children's activities can be useful to caregivers and clinicians who need behavioral evidence to support children with autism. However, image capture systems for autism are typically complex and provide only a top-down, outsider's view. In this work, we assessed the use of cameras worn by children to record the context of their activities and interactions from their perspective. We used a technology probe to explore how this simple, parent-driven system could be designed for families to adopt in their homes. We present the results of a five-week field study with five families. The system helped parents to (1) see the world from their child's eyes, (2) increase their understanding of their child's needs when their child is uncommunicative, and (3) help them encourage their child's social engagement. We discuss how these systems can be designed and used to their full potential.

© All rights reserved Marcu et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
Edit | Del

Kim, SeungJun, Dey, Anind K., Lee, Joonhwan and Forlizzi, Jodi (2011): Usability of car dashboard displays for elder drivers. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 493-502. Available online

The elder population is rising worldwide; in the US, no longer being able to drive is a significant marker of loss of independence. One of the approaches to helping elders drive more safely is to investigate the use of automotive user interface technology, and specifically, to explore the instrument panel (IP) display design to help attract and manage attention and make information easier to interpret. In this paper, we explore the premise that dashboard displays can be better designed to support elder drivers, their information needs, and their cognitive capabilities. We conducted a study to understand which display design features are critically linked to issues of divided attention and driving performance. We found that contrast of size and reduced clutter are instrumental in enhancing driving performance, particularly for the elder population. Surprisingly, our results showed that color elements have a negative effect on driving performance for elders, while color elements and fills slightly improve performance. We conclude with design implications generated from this work.

© All rights reserved Kim et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Davidoff, Scott, Ziebart, Brian D., Zimmerman, John and Dey, Anind K. (2011): Learning patterns of pick-ups and drop-offs to support busy family coordination. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1175-1184. Available online

Part of being a parent is taking responsibility for arranging and supplying transportation of children between various events. Dual-income parents frequently develop routines to help manage transportation with a minimal amount of attention. On days when families deviate from their routines, effective logistics can often depend on knowledge of the routine location, availability and intentions of other family members. Since most families rarely document their routine activities, making that needed information unavailable, coordination breakdowns are much more likely to occur. To address this problem we demonstrate the feasibility of learning family routines using mobile phone GPS. We describe how we (1) detect pick-ups and drop-offs; (2) predict which parent will perform a future pick-up or drop-off; and (3) infer if a child will be left at an activity. We discuss how these routine models give digital calendars, reminder and location systems new capabilities to help prevent breakdowns, and improve family life.

© All rights reserved Davidoff et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Lee, Matthew L. and Dey, Anind K. (2011): Reflecting on pills and phone use: supporting awareness of functional abilities for older adults. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2095-2104. Available online

Older adults often struggle with maintaining self-aware of their ability to carry out everyday activities important for independence. Unobtrusive sensors embedded in the home can monitor how older adults interact with objects around the home and can provide objective accounts of behaviors to support self-awareness. In this paper, we describe the design and four month deployment of a prototype sensing system that tracks medication taking and phone use in the homes of two older adults. We describe two case studies on 1) how they engaged with the data by looking for and explaining their own anomalous behaviors and 2) how they used the sensor data to reflect on their actions and their own self-awareness of their abilities to remain independent. Finally, we propose recommendations for the design of home sensing systems that support awareness of functional abilities for older adults using reflection.

© All rights reserved Lee and Dey and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Lim, Brian Y. and Dey, Anind K. (2011): Design of an intelligible mobile context-aware application. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 157-166. Available online

Context-aware applications are increasingly complex and autonomous, and research has indicated that explanations can help users better understand and ultimately trust their autonomous behavior. However, it is still unclear how to effectively present and provide these explanations. This work builds on previous work to make context-aware applications intelligible by supporting a suite of explanations using eight question types (e.g., Why, Why Not, What If). We present a formative study on design and usability issues for making an intelligible real-world, mobile context-aware application, focusing on the use of intelligibility for the mobile contexts of availability, place, motion, and sound activity. We discuss design strategies that we considered, findings of explanation use, and design recommendations to make intelligibility more usable.

© All rights reserved Lim and Dey and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K., Wac, Katarzyna, Ferreira, Denzil, Tassini, Kevin, Hong, Jin-Hyuk and Ramos, Julian (2011): Getting closer: an empirical investigation of the proximity of user to their smart phones. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 163-172. Available online

Much research in ubiquitous computing assumes that a user's phone will be always on and at-hand, for collecting user context and for communicating with a user. Previous work with the previous generation of mobile phones has shown that such an assumption is false. Here, we investigate whether this assumption about users' proximity to their mobile phones holds for a new generation of mobile phones, smart phones. We conduct a data collection field study of 28 smart phone owners over a period of 4 weeks. We show that in fact this assumption is still false, with the within arm's reach proximity being true close to 50% of the time, similar to the earlier work. However, we also show that smart phone proximity within the same room (arm+room) as the user is true almost 90% of the time. We discuss the reasons for these phone proximities and the implications of this on the development of mobile phone applications, particularly those that collect user and environmental context, and delivering notification to users. We also show that we can accurately predict the proximity at the arm level and arm+room level with 75 and 83% accuracy, respectively, with features simple to collect and model on a mobile phone. Further we show that for several individuals who are almost always within the arm+room level, we can predict this level with over 90% accuracy.

© All rights reserved Dey et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Li, Ian, Dey, Anind K. and Forlizzi, Jodi (2011): Understanding my data, myself: supporting self-reflection with ubicomp technologies. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 405-414. Available online

We live in a world where many kinds of data about us can be collected and more will be collected as Ubicomp technologies mature. People reflect on this data using different tools for personal informatics. However, current tools do not have sufficient understanding of users' self-reflection needs to appropriately leverage Ubicomp technologies. To design tools that effectively assist self-reflection, we need to comprehensively understand what kinds of questions people have about their data, why they ask these questions, how they answer them with current tools, and what kinds of problems they encounter. To explore this, we conducted interviews with people who use various kinds of tools for personal informatics. We found six kinds of questions that people asked about their data. We also found that certain kinds of questions are more important at certain times, which we call phases. We identified two phases of reflection: Discovery and Maintenance. We discuss the kinds of questions and the phases in detail and identify features that should be supported in personal informatics tools for which Ubicomp technologies can play an important role.

© All rights reserved Li et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Lim, Brian Y. and Dey, Anind K. (2011): Investigating intelligibility for uncertain context-aware applications. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 415-424. Available online

Context-aware applications use sensing and inference to attempt to determine users' contexts, and take appropriate action. However, they are prone to uncertainty, and this may compromise the trust users have in them. Providing intelligibility has been proposed to help explain to users how context-aware applications work in order to improve user impressions of them. However, we hypothesize that intelligibility may actually be harmful for applications that are very uncertain of their actions. We conducted a large controlled study of a location-aware and a sound-aware application, investigating the impact of intelligibility on understanding, and user impression of applications with varying certainty. We found that intelligibility impacts user impressions, depending on the application's certainty and behavior appropriateness. Intelligibility is helpful for applications with high certainty, but it is harmful if applications behave appropriately, yet display low certainty.

© All rights reserved Lim and Dey and/or ACM Press

2010
 
Edit | Del

Lim, Brian Y. and Dey, Anind K. (2010): Toolkit to support intelligibility in context-aware applications. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 13-22. Available online

Context-aware applications should be intelligible so users can better understand how they work and improve their trust in them. However, providing intelligibility is non-trivial and requires the developer to understand how to generate explanations from application decision models. Furthermore, users need different types of explanations and this complicates the implementation of intelligibility. We have developed the Intelligibility Toolkit that makes it easy for application developers to obtain eight types of explanations from the most popular decision models of context-aware applications. We describe its extensible architecture, and the explanation generation algorithms we developed. We validate the usefulness of the toolkit with three canonical applications that use the toolkit to generate explanations for end-users.

© All rights reserved Lim and Dey and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Haapalainen, Eija, Kim, SeungJun, Forlizzi, Jodi and Dey, Anind K. (2010): Psycho-physiological measures for assessing cognitive load. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 301-310. Available online

With a focus on presenting information at the right time, the ubicomp community can benefit greatly from learning the most salient human measures of cognitive load. Cognitive load can be used as a metric to determine when or whether to interrupt a user. In this paper, we collected data from multiple sensors and compared their ability to assess cognitive load. Our focus is on visual perception and cognitive speed-focused tasks that leverage cognitive abilities common in ubicomp applications. We found that across all participants, the electrocardiogram median absolute deviation and median heat flux measurements were the most accurate at distinguishing between low and high levels of cognitive load, providing a classification accuracy of over 80% when used together. Our contribution is a real-time, objective, and generalizable method for assessing cognitive load in cognitive tasks commonly found in ubicomp systems and situations of divided attention.

© All rights reserved Haapalainen et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Harrison, Chris, Dey, Anind K. and Hudson, Scott E. (2010): Evaluation of progressive image loading schemes. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1549-1552. Available online

Although network bandwidth has increased dramatically, high-resolution images often take several seconds to load, and considerably longer on mobile devices over wireless connections. Progressive image loading techniques allow for some visual content to be displayed prior to the whole file being downloaded. In this note, we present an empirical evaluation of popular progressive image loading methods, and derive one novel technique from our findings. Results suggest a spiral variation of bilinear interlacing can yield an improvement in content recognition time.

© All rights reserved Harrison et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Davidoff, Scott, Zimmerman, John and Dey, Anind K. (2010): How routine learners can support family coordination. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2461-2470. Available online

Researchers have detailed the importance of routines in how people live and work, while also cautioning system designers about the importance of people's idiosyncratic behavior patterns and the challenges they would present to learning systems. We wish to take up their challenge, and offer a vision of how simple sensing technology could capture and model idiosyncratic routines, enabling applications to solve many real world problems. To identify how a simple routine learner can demonstrate this in support of family coordination, we conducted six months of nightly interviews with six families, focusing on how they make and execute plans. Our data reveals that only about 40% of events unfold in a routine manner. When deviations do occur, family members often need but do not have access to accurate information about their routines. With about 90% of their content concerning deviations, not routines, families do not rely on calendars to support them during these moments. We discuss how coordination tools, like calendars and reminder systems, would improve coordination and reduce stress when augmented with routine information, and how commercial mobile phones can support the automatic creation of routine models.

© All rights reserved Davidoff et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Schmidt, Albrecht, Dey, Anind K., Kun, Andrew L. and Spiessl, Wolfgang (2010): Automotive user interfaces: human computer interaction in the car. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 3177-3180. Available online

Cars have become complex interactive systems. Mechanical controls and electrical systems are transformed to the digital realm. It is common that drivers operate a vehicle and, at the same time, interact with a variety of devices and applications. Texting while driving, looking up an address for the navigation system, and taking a phone call are just some common examples that add value for the driver, but also increase the risk of driving. Novel interaction technologies create many opportunities for designing useful and attractive in-car user interfaces. With technologies that assist the user in driving, such as assistive cruise control and lane keeping, the user interface is essential to the way people perceive the driving experience. New means for user interface development and interaction design are required as the number of factors influencing the design space for automotive user interfaces is increasing. In comparison to other domains, a trial and error approach while the product is already in the market is not acceptable as the cost of failure may be fatal. User interface design in the automotive domain is relevant across many areas ranging from primary driving control, to assisted functions, to navigation, information services, entertainment and games.

© All rights reserved Schmidt et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Rosenthal, Stephanie L. and Dey, Anind K. (2010): Towards maximizing the accuracy of human-labeled sensor data. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2010. pp. 259-268. Available online

We present two studies that evaluate the accuracy of human responses to an intelligent agent's data classification questions. Prior work has shown that agents can elicit accurate human responses, but the applications vary widely in the data features and prediction information they provide to the labelers when asking for help. In an initial analysis of this work, we found the five most popular features, namely uncertainty, amount and level of context, prediction of an answer, and request for user feedback. We propose that there is a set of these data features and prediction information that maximizes the accuracy of labeler responses. In our first study, we compare accuracy of users of an activity recognizer labeling their own data across the dimensions. In the second study, participants were asked to classify a stranger's emails into folders and strangers' work activities by interruptibility. We compared the accuracy of the responses to the users' self-reports across the same five dimensions. We found very similar combinations of information (for users and strangers) that led to very accurate responses as well as more feedback that the agents could use to refine their predictions. We use these results for insight into the information that help labelers the most.

© All rights reserved Rosenthal and Dey and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K., Hightower, Jeffrey, Lara, Eyal de and Davies, Nigel (2010): Location-Based Services. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 9 pp. 11-12. Available online

2009
 
Edit | Del

Kim, SeungJun and Dey, Anind K. (2009): Simulated augmented reality windshield display as a cognitive mapping aid for elder driver navigation. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 133-142. Available online

A common effect of aging is decline in spatial cognition. This is an issue for all elders, but particularly for elder drivers. To address this driving issue, we propose a novel concept of an in-vehicle navigation display system that displays navigation information directly onto the vehicle's windshield, superimposing it on the driver's view of the actual road. An evaluation of our simulated version of this display shows that it results in a significant reduction in navigation errors and distraction-related measures compared to a typical in-car navigation display for elder drivers. These results help us understand how context-sensitive information and a simulated augmented reality representation can be combined to minimize the cognitive load in translating between virtual/information spaces and the real world.

© All rights reserved Kim and Dey and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K. and Newberger, Alan (2009): Support for context-aware intelligibility and control. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 859-868. Available online

Intelligibility and control are important user concerns in context-aware applications. They allow a user to understand why an application is behaving a certain way, and to change its behavior. Because of their importance to end users, they must be addressed at an interface level. However, often the sensors or machine learning systems that users need to understand and control are created long before a specific application is built, or created separately from the application interface. Thus, supporting interface designers in building intelligibility and control into interfaces requires application logic and underlying infrastructure to be exposed in some structured fashion. As context-aware infrastructures do not provide generalized support for this, we extended one such infrastructure with Situations, components that appropriately exposes application logic, and supports debugging and simple intelligibility and control interfaces, while making it easier for an application developer to build context-aware applications and facilitating designer access to application state and behavior. We developed support for interface designers in Visual Basic and Flash. We demonstrate the usefulness of this support through an evaluation of programmers, an evaluation of the usability of the new infrastructure with interface designers, and the augmentation of three common context-aware applications.

© All rights reserved Dey and Newberger and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Lim, Brian Y., Dey, Anind K. and Avrahami, Daniel (2009): Why and why not explanations improve the intelligibility of context-aware intelligent systems. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 2119-2128. Available online

Context-aware intelligent systems employ implicit inputs, and make decisions based on complex rules and machine learning models that are rarely clear to users. Such lack of system intelligibility can lead to loss of user trust, satisfaction and acceptance of these systems. However, automatically providing explanations about a system's decision process can help mitigate this problem. In this paper we present results from a controlled study with over 200 participants in which the effectiveness of different types of explanations was examined. Participants were shown examples of a system's operation along with various automatically generated explanations, and then tested on their understanding of the system. We show, for example, that explanations describing why the system behaved a certain way resulted in better understanding and stronger feelings of trust. Explanations describing why the system did not behave a certain way, resulted in lower understanding yet adequate performance. We discuss implications for the use of our findings in real-world context-aware applications.

© All rights reserved Lim et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Hkkil, Jonna, Schmidt, Albrecht, Mntyjrvi, Jani, Sahami, Alireza, kerman, Panu and Dey, Anind K. (2009): Context-Aware Mobile Media and Social Networks. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 108. Available online

Context-awareness is one of the rising trends of future mobile technology, and due to advances in technology development, new application and service concepts are being developed and demonstrated in an ever-increasing manner. This workshop brings together researchers and practitioners working on humancomputer interaction (HCI) aspects of context-aware mobile technology and communities to present their insights and research on new concepts, interaction design for mobile context-awareness, usability challenges, collaborative context-aware services and applications for supporting communities, and other topics related to HCI with mobile context-aware technology.

© All rights reserved Hkkil et al. and/or their publisher

 
Edit | Del

Schmidt, Albrecht, Dey, Anind K., Seder, Thomas and Juhlin, Oskar (eds.) Proceedings of 1st International Conference on Automotive User Interfaces and Interactive Vehicular Applications - AutomotiveUI 2009 21-22 September , 2009, Essen, Germany.

 
Edit | Del

Harrison, Beverly and Dey, Anind K. (2009): What Have You Done with Location-Based Services Lately?. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 8 (4) pp. 66-70. Available online

2008
 
Edit | Del

Harrison, Chris and Dey, Anind K. (2008): Lean and zoom: proximity-aware user interface and content magnification. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 507-510. Available online

The size and resolution of computer displays has increased dramatically, allowing more information than ever to be rendered on-screen. However, items can now be so small or screens so cluttered that users need to lean forward to properly examine them. This behavior may be detrimental to a user's posture and eyesight. Our Lean and Zoom system detects a user's proximity to the display using a camera and magnifies the on-screen content proportionally. This alleviates dramatic leaning and makes items more readable. Results from a user study indicate people find the technique natural and intuitive. Most participants found on-screen content easier to read, and believed the technique would improve both their performance and comfort.

© All rights reserved Harrison and Dey and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Shin, Choonsung, Dey, Anind K. and Woo, Woontack (2008): Mixed-initiative conflict resolution for context-aware applications. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 262-271. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Hsieh, Gary, Li, Ian, Dey, Anind K., Forlizzi, Jodi and Hudson, Scott E. (2008): Using visualizations to increase compliance in experience sampling. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 164-167. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Ziebart, Brian, Maas, Andrew L., Dey, Anind K. and Bagnell, J. Andrew (2008): Navigate like a cabbie: probabilistic reasoning from observed context-aware behavior. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 322-331. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Lee, Matthew L. and Dey, Anind K. (2008): Lifelogging memory appliance for people with episodic memory impairment. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 44-53. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Hayes, Gillian R. and Dey, Anind K. (2008): The Pervasive 2007 Workshops. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 7 (1) pp. 85-88. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Mutka, Matt W., Becker, Christian, Dey, Anind K., Lau, Francis and Zruba, Gergely V. (2008): PerCom 2008 special issue. In Pervasive and Mobile Computing, 4 (6) pp. 789-790. Available online

2007
 
Edit | Del

Tullio, Joe, Dey, Anind K., Chalecki, Jason and Fogarty, James (2007): How it works: a field study of non-technical users interacting with an intelligent system. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 31-40. Available online

In order to develop intelligent systems that attain the trust of their users, it is important to understand how users perceive such systems and develop those perceptions over time. We present an investigation into how users come to understand an intelligent system as they use it in their daily work. During a six-week field study, we interviewed eight office workers regarding the operation of a system that predicted their managers' interruptibility, comparing their mental models to the actual system model. Our results show that by the end of the study, participants were able to discount some of their initial misconceptions about what information the system used for reasoning about interruptibility. However, the overarching structures of their mental models stayed relatively stable over the course of the study. Lastly, we found that participants were able to give lay descriptions attributing simple machine learning concepts to the system despite their lack of technical knowledge. Our findings suggest an appropriate level of feedback for user interfaces of intelligent systems, provide a baseline level of complexity for user understanding, and highlight the challenges of making users aware of sensed inputs for such systems.

© All rights reserved Tullio et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Davidoff, Scott, Lee, Min Kyung, Dey, Anind K. and Zimmerman, John (2007): Rapidly Exploring Application Design Through Speed Dating. In: Krumm, John, Abowd, Gregory D., Seneviratne, Aruna and Strang, Thomas (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing September 16-19, 2007, Innsbruck, Austria. pp. 429-446. Available online

While the user-centered design methods we bring from human-computer interaction to ubicomp help sketch ideas and refine prototypes, few tools or techniques help explore divergent design concepts, reflect on their merits, and come to a new understanding of design opportunities and ways to address them. We present Speed Dating, a design method for rapidly exploring application concepts and their interactions and contextual dimensions without requiring any technology implementation. Situated between sketching and prototyping, Speed Dating structures comparison of concepts, helping identify and understand contextual risk factors and develop approaches to address them. We illustrate how to use Speed Dating by applying it to our research on the smart home and dual-income families, and highlight our findings from using this method.

© All rights reserved Davidoff et al. and/or Springer Berlin - Heidelberg

 
Edit | Del

Lee, Matthew L. and Dey, Anind K. (2007): Providing good memory cues for people with episodic memory impairment. In: Ninth Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2007. pp. 131-138. Available online

Alzheimer's disease impairs episodic memory and subtly and progressively robs people of their ability to remember their recent experiences. In this paper, we describe two studies that lead to a better understanding of how caregivers use cues to support episodic memory impairment and what types of cues are best for supporting recollection. We also show how good memory cues differ between people with and without episodic memory impairment. We discuss how this improved understanding impacts the design of life logging technologies for automatically capturing and extracting the best memory cues to assist overburdened caregivers and people with episodic memory impairment in supporting recollection of episodic memory.

© All rights reserved Lee and Dey and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Hurst, Amy, Mankoff, Jennifer, Dey, Anind K. and Hudson, Scott E. (2007): Dirty desktops: using a patina of magnetic mouse dust to make common interactor targets easier to select. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology October 7-10, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 183-186. Available online

A common task in graphical user interfaces is controlling onscreen elements using a pointer. Current adaptive pointing techniques require applications to be built using accessibility libraries that reveal information about interactive targets, and most do not handle path/menu navigation. We present a pseudo-haptic technique that is OS and application independent, and can handle both dragging and clicking. We do this by associating a small force with each past click or drag. When a user frequently clicks in the same general area (e.g., on a button), the patina of past clicks naturally creates a pseudo-haptic magnetic field with an effect similar to that ofsnapping or sticky icons. Our contribution is a bottom-up approach to make targets easier to select without requiring prior knowledge of them.

© All rights reserved Hurst et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Schiele, Bernt, Dey, Anind K., Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Ruyter, Boris de, Tscheligi, Manfred, Aarts, Emile and Buchmann, Alejandro (eds.) Proceedings of Ambient Intelligence European Conference, AmI 2007 November 7-10, 2007, Darmstadt, Germany.

 
Edit | Del

Schiele, Bernt, Dey, Anind K., Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Ruyter, Boris E. R. de, Tscheligi, Manfred, Wichert, Reiner, Aarts, Emile H. L. and Buchmann, Alejandro P. (eds.) Ambient Intelligence European Conference - AmI 2007 November 7-10, 2007, Darmstadt, Germany.

 
Edit | Del

Davidoff, Scott, Lee, Min Kyung, Dey, Anind K. and Zimmerman, John (2007): Rapidly Exploring Application Design Through Speed Dating. In: Krumm, John, Abowd, Gregory D., Seneviratne, Aruna and Strang, Thomas (eds.) UbiComp 2007 Ubiquitous Computing - 9th International Conference September 16-19, 2007, Innsbruck, Austria. pp. 429-446. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Lee, Min Kyung, Davidoff, Scott, Zimmerman, John and Dey, Anind K. (2007): Smart bag: managing home and raising children. In: Koskinen, Ilpo and Keinonen, Turkka (eds.) DPPI 2007 - Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces August 22-25, 2007, Helsinki, Finland. pp. 434-437. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Li, Ian, Forlizzi, Jodi, Dey, Anind K. and Kiesler, Sara (2007): My agent as myself or another: effects on credibility and listening to advice. In: Koskinen, Ilpo and Keinonen, Turkka (eds.) DPPI 2007 - Proceedings of the 2007 International Conference on Designing Pleasurable Products and Interfaces August 22-25, 2007, Helsinki, Finland. pp. 194-208. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Schiele, Bernt, Dey, Anind K., Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Ruyter, Boris de, Tscheligi, Manfred, Wichert, Reiner, Aerts, Emile and Buchmann, Alejandro (eds.) European Conference on Ambient Intelligence November 7-10, 2007, Darmstadt, Germany.

 
Edit | Del

Torrey, Cristen, Burke, Moira, Lee, Matthew L., Dey, Anind K., Fussell, Susan R. and Kiesler, Sara (2007): Connected Giving: Ordinary People Coordinating Disaster Relief on the Internet. In: HICSS 2007 - 40th Hawaii International International Conference on Systems Science 3-6 January, 2007, Waikoloa, Big Island, HI, USA. p. 179. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Forlizzi, Jodi, Li, Ian and Dey, Anind K. (2007): Ambient Interfaces that Motivate Changes in Human Behavior. In: Hazlewood, William R., Coyle, Lorcan and Consolvo, Sunny (eds.) Proceedings of the 1st International Workshop on Ambient Information Systems - Colocated at Pervasive 2007 May 13, 2007, Toronto, Canada. . Available online

2006
 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K. and Guzman, Ed de (2006): From awareness to connectedness: the design and deployment of presence displays. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 899-908. Available online

Computer displays can be helpful for making users aware of the remote presence of friends and family. In many of the research projects that have explored the use of novel displays, the real goal is to improve a user's sense of connectedness to those remote loved ones. However, very few have leveraged a user-centered design process or empirically studied the effects of using a display on users' sense of awareness and connectedness. In this paper, we present our multi-phase, user-centered design process for building displays that support awareness and connectedness: Presence Displays, which are physical, peripheral awareness displays of online presence of close friends or family. We present evidence, from a 5-week long field study, that these displays provide significantly better awareness of and connectedness to a loved one, than a traditional graphical display of online presence.

© All rights reserved Dey and Guzman and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Davidoff, Scott, Lee, Min Kyung, Yiu, Charles, Zimmerman, John and Dey, Anind K. (2006): Principles of Smart Home Control. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) Poceedings of the 8th International Conference on Ubiquitous Computing September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 19-34. Available online

Seeking to be sensitive to users, smart home researchers have focused on the concept of control. They attempt to allow users to gain control over their lives by framing the problem as one of end-user programming. But families are not users as we typically conceive them, and a large body of ethnographic research shows how their activities and routines do not map well to programming tasks. End-user programming ultimately provides control of devices. But families want more control of their lives. In this paper, we explore this disconnect. Using grounded contextual fieldwork with dual-income families, we describe the control that families want, and suggest seven design principles that will help end-user programming systems deliver that control.

© All rights reserved Davidoff et al. and/or Springer Berlin - Heidelberg

 
Edit | Del

Davidoff, Scott, Lee, Min Kyung, Yiu, Charles, Zimmerman, John and Dey, Anind K. (2006): Principles of Smart Home Control. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) UbiComp 2006 Ubiquitous Computing - 8th International Conference September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 19-34. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K., Sohn, Timothy, Streng, Sara and Kodama, Justin (2006): iCAP: Interactive Prototyping of Context-Aware Applications. In: Fishkin, Kenneth P., Schiele, Bernt, Nixon, Paddy and Quigley, Aaron J. (eds.) PERVASIVE 2006 - Pervasive Computing 4th International Conference May 7-10, 2006, Dublin, Ireland. pp. 254-271. Available online

2005
 
Edit | Del

Mankoff, Demi, Dey, Anind K., Mankoff, Jennifer and Mankoff, Ken (2005): Supporting interspecies social awareness: using peripheral displays for distributed pack awareness. In: Proceedings of the 2005 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2005. pp. 253-258. Available online

In interspecies households, it is common for the non homo sapien members to be isolated and ignored for many hours each day when humans are out of the house or working. For pack animals, such as canines, information about a pack member\'s extended pack interactions (outside of the nuclear household) could help to mitigate this social isolation. We have developed a Pack Activity Watch System: Allowing Broad Interspecies Love In Telecommunication with Internet-Enabled Sociability (PAWSABILITIES) for helping to support remote awareness of social activities. Our work focuses on canine companions, and includes, pawticipatory design, labradory tests, and canid camera monitoring.

© All rights reserved Mankoff et al. and/or ACM Press

2004
 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K., Hamid, Raffay, Beckmann, Chris, Li, Ian and Hsu, Daniel (2004): a CAPpella: programming by demonstration of context-aware applications. In: Dykstra-Erickson, Elizabeth and Tscheligi, Manfred (eds.) Proceedings of ACM CHI 2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 33-40. Available online

Context-aware applications are applications that implicitly take their context of use into account by adapting to changes in a user's activities and environments. No one has more intimate knowledge about these activities and environments than end-users themselves. Currently there is no support for end-users to build context-aware applications for these dynamic settings. To address this issue, we present a CAPpella, a programming by demonstration Context-Aware Prototyping environment intended for end-users. Users "program" their desired context-aware behavior (situation and associated action) in situ, without writing any code, by demonstrating it to a CAPpella and by annotating the relevant portions of the demonstration. Using a meeting and medicine-taking scenario, we illustrate how a user can demonstrate different behaviors to a CAPpella. We describe a CAPpella's underlying system to explain how it supports users in building behaviors and present a study of 14 end-users to illustrate its feasibility and usability.

© All rights reserved Dey et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Matthews, Tara, Dey, Anind K., Mankoff, Jennifer, Carter, Scott and Rattenbury, Tye (2004): A toolkit for managing user attention in peripheral displays. In: Proceedings of the 2004 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2004. pp. 247-256. Available online

Traditionally, computer interfaces have been confined to conventional displays and focused activities. However, as displays become embedded throughout our environment and daily lives, increasing numbers of them must operate on the periphery of our attention. Peripheral displays can allow a person to be aware of information while she is attending to some other primary task or activity. We present the Peripheral Displays Toolkit (PTK), a toolkit that provides structured support for managing user attention in the development of peripheral displays. Our goal is to enable designers to explore different approaches to managing user attention. The PTK supports three issues specific to conveying information on the periphery of human attention. These issues are abstraction of raw input, rules for assigning notification levels to input, and transitions for updating a display when input arrives. Our contribution is the investigation of issues specific to attention in peripheral display design and a toolkit that encapsulates support for these issues. We describe our toolkit architecture and present five sample peripheral displays demonstrating our toolkit\'s capabilities.

© All rights reserved Matthews et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Lederer, Scott, Hong, Jason I., Dey, Anind K. and Landay, James A. (2004): Personal privacy through understanding and action: five pitfalls for designers. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 8 (6) pp. 440-454. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Matthews, Tara, Gellersen, Hans-Werner, Laerhoven, Kristof van and Dey, Anind K. (2004): Augmenting Collections of Everyday Objects: A Case Study of Clothes Hangers As an Information Display. In: Ferscha, Alois and Mattern, Friedemann (eds.) PERVASIVE 2004 - Pervasive Computing, Second International Conference April 21-23, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 340-344. Available online

2003
 
Edit | Del

Mankoff, Jennifer, Dey, Anind K., Hsieh, Gary, Kientz, Julie, Lederer, Scott and Ames, Morgan (2003): Heuristic evaluation of ambient displays. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 169-176.

 
Edit | Del

Edwards, W. Keith, Bellotti, Victoria, Dey, Anind K. and Newman, Mark W. (2003): The challenges of user-centered design and evaluation for infrastructure. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 297-304.

 
Edit | Del

Barkhuus, Louise and Dey, Anind K. (2003): Location-Based Services for Mobile Telephony: a study of users' privacy concerns. In: Proceedings of IFIP INTERACT03: Human-Computer Interaction 2003, Zurich, Switzerland. p. 709.

 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K., Schmidt, Albrecht and McCarthy, Joseph F. (eds.) UbiComp 2003 Ubiquitous Computing - 5th International Conference October 12-15, 2003, Seattle, WA, USA.

 
Edit | Del

Barkhuus, Louise and Dey, Anind K. (2003): Is Context-Aware Computing Taking Control away from the User? Three Levels of Interactivity Examined. In: Dey, Anind K., Schmidt, Albrecht and McCarthy, Joseph F. (eds.) UbiComp 2003 Ubiquitous Computing - 5th International Conference October 12-15, 2003, Seattle, WA, USA. pp. 149-156. Available online

2002
 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K., Mankoff, Jennifer, Abowd, Gregory D. and Carter, Scott (2002): Distributed mediation of ambiguous context in aware environments. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel (ed.) Proceedings of the 15th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 27-30, 2002, Paris, France. pp. 121-130. Available online

Many context-aware services make the assumption that the context they use is completely accurate. However, in reality, both sensed and interpreted context is often ambiguous. A challenge facing the development of realistic and deployable context-aware services, therefore, is the ability to handle ambiguous context. In this paper, we describe an architecture that supports the building of context-aware services that assume context is ambiguous and allows for mediation of ambiguity by mobile users in aware environments. We illustrate the use of our architecture and evaluate it through three example context-aware services, a word predictor system, an In/Out Board, and a reminder tool.

© All rights reserved Dey et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Mankoff, Jennifer, Dey, Anind K., Batra, Udit and Moore, Melody (2002): Web accessibility for low bandwidth input. In: Fifth Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2002. pp. 17-24. Available online

One of the first, most common, and most useful applications that today's computer users access is the World Wide Web (web). One population of users for whom the web is especially important is those with motor disabilities, because it may enable them to do things that they might not otherwise be able to do: shopping; getting an education; running a business. This is particularly important for low bandwidth users: users with such limited motor and speech that they can only produce one or two signals when communicating with a computer. We present requirements for low bandwidth web accessibility, and two tools that address these requirements. The first is a modified web browser, the second a proxy that modifies HTML. Both work without requiring web page authors to modify their pages.

© All rights reserved Mankoff et al. and/or ACM Press

2001
 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K., Abowd, Gregory D. and Salber, Daniel (2001): A Conceptual Framework and a Toolkit for Supporting the Rapid Prototyping of Context-Aware Applications. In Human-Computer Interaction, 16 (2) pp. 97-166.

Computing devices and applications are now used beyond the desktop, in diverse environments, and this trend toward ubiquitous computing is accelerating. One challenge that remains in this emerging research field is the ability to enhance the behavior of any application by informing it of the context of its use. By context, we refer to any information that characterizes a situation related to the interaction between humans, applications, and the surrounding environment. Context-aware applications promise richer and easier interaction, but the current state of research in this field is still far removed from that vision. This is due to 3 main problems: (a) the notion of context is still ill defined, (b) there is a lack of conceptual models and methods to help drive the design of context-aware applications, and (c) no tools are available to jump-start the development of context-aware applications. In this anchor article, we address these 3 problems in turn. We first define context, identify categories of contextual information, and characterize context-aware application behavior. Though the full impact of context-aware computing requires understanding very subtle and high-level notions of context, we are focusing our efforts on the pieces of context that can be inferred automatically from sensors in a physical environment. We then present a conceptual framework that separates the acquisition and representation of context from the delivery and reaction to context by a context-aware application. We have built a toolkit, the Context Toolkit, that instantiates this conceptual framework and supports the rapid development of a rich space of context-aware applications. We illustrate the usefulness of the conceptual framework by describing a number of context-aware applications that have been prototyped using the Context Toolkit. We also demonstrate how such a framework can support the investigation of important research challenges in the area of context-aware computing.

© All rights reserved Dey et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
Edit | Del

Nagel, Kris, Kidd, Cory D., O'Connell, Thomas, Dey, Anind K. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2001): The Family Intercom: Developing a Context-Aware Audio Communication System. In: Abowd, Gregory D., Brumitt, Barry and Shafer, Steven A. (eds.) Ubicomp 2001 Ubiquitous Computing - Third International Conference September 30 - October 2, 2001, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 176-183. Available online

 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K. (2001): Understanding and Using Context. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 5 (1) pp. 4-7. Available online

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K., Kortuem, Gerd, Morse, David R. and Schmidt, Albrecht (2001): editoral: Situated Interaction and Context-Aware Computing. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 5 (1) pp. 1-3. Available online

2000
 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K. and Abowd, Gregory D. (2000): CybreMinder: A Context-Aware System for Supporting Reminders. In: Thomas, Peter J. and Gellersen, Hans-Werner (eds.) Handheld and Ubiquitous Computing - Second International Symposium - HUC 2000 September 25-27, 2000, Bristol, UK. pp. 172-186. Available online

1999
 
Edit | Del

Abowd, Gregory D., Dey, Anind K., Brown, Peter J., Davies, Nigel, Smith, Mark and Steggles, Pete (1999): Towards a Better Understanding of Context and Context-Awareness. In: Gellersen, Hans-Werner (ed.) Handheld and Ubiquitous Computing - First International Symposium - HUC99 September 27-29, 1999, Karlsruhe, Germany. pp. 304-307. Available online

1998
 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K., Abowd, Gregory D. and Wood, Andrew (1998): Cyberdesk: A Framework for Providing Self-Integrating Context-Aware Services. In: Marks, Joe (ed.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 1998 January 6-9, 1998, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 47-54. Available online

Applications are often designed to take advantage of the potential for integration with each other via shared information. Current approaches for integration are limited, effecting both the programmer and end-user. In this paper, we present CyberDesk, a framework for self-integrating software in which integration is driven by user context. It relieves the burden on programmers by removing the necessity to predict how software should be integrated. It also relieves the burden from users by removing the need to understand how different software components work together.

© All rights reserved Dey et al. and/or ACM Press

1997
 
Edit | Del

Woodruff, Allison, Dey, Anind K. and Abowd, Gregory D. (1997): CyberDesk: Automated Integration of Desktop and Network Services. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 552-553. Available online

The CyberDesk project suggests a way to break the prevailing assumption in personal computing that the user must search out ways to integrate behavior between separate services. We present a technique and prototype system for automatic integration of desktop applications and network services that requires no effort by either the designer or the end-user.

© All rights reserved Woodruff et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Edit | Del

Dey, Anind K., Abowd, Gregory D., Pinkerton, Mike and Wood, Andrew (1997): CyberDesk: A Framework for Providing Self-Integrating Ubiquitous Software Services. In: Robertson, George G. and Schmandt, Chris (eds.) Proceedings of the 10th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology October 14 - 17, 1997, Banff, Alberta, Canada. pp. 75-76. Available online

Current software suites suffer from problems due to poor integration of their individual tools. They require the designer to think of all possible integrating behaviours and leave little flexibility to the user. CyberDesk is a component software framework that automatically integrates desktop and network services, reducing integrating decisions to be made by the tool designers and giving more control to the user. Simple extensions to CyberDesk have been made to obtain powerful integrating behaviours.

© All rights reserved Dey et al. and/or ACM Press

 
Add publication
Show list on your website
 
 

Join our community and advance:

Your
Skills

Your
Network

Your
Career

 
Join our community!
 
 
 

Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/anind_k__dey.html