Publication statistics

Pub. period:1997-2012
Pub. count:34
Number of co-authors:67



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Tom Rodden:20
Steve Benford:13
Peter Tolmie:8

 

 

Productive colleagues

Andy Crabtree's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Steve Benford:121
Alan J. Dix:107
Tom Rodden:106
 
 
 
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Andy Crabtree

Has also published under the name of:
"A. Crabtree"

Personal Homepage:
andy-crabtree.com/ethnography/work.html


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Publications by Andy Crabtree (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Benford, Steve, Tolmie, Peter, Ahmed, Ahmed Y., Crabtree, Andy and Rodden, Tom (2012): Supporting traditional music-making: designing for situated discretion. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW12 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2012. pp. 127-136.

An ethnographic study of Irish music sessions in pubs elaborates the collaborative work involved in making traditional music. Central to this distinctive achievement is the sequencing of tunes so that they hang together and combine to form discrete "sets", which rely on a shared knowledge of musical repertoires. Our study shows how musicians develop this musical knowledge through the use of digital resources and social networks. It also reveals how musicians construct and make use of various paper props to help bring their knowledge to bear in the actual in vivo course of a session so as to maintain the moral order of making music together in a demonstrably traditional way. The social demands of musical "etiquette" sensitise CSCW to the need to design technologies to support the "situated discretion" that is essential to traditional practices. We elaborate this notion through a discussion of requirements for technologies that bridge between online resources and the collaborative sequencing of tunes during performance.

© All rights reserved Benford et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Crabtree, Andy, Mortier, Richard, Rodden, Tom and Tolmie, Peter (2012): Unremarkable networking: the home network as a part of everyday life. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 554-563.

This paper extends the focus of current research into home networks. It represents a shift in perspective from the home network as something that is essentially understood as a technological object by the inhabitants of the home, to something that is understood by household members as a sociological object wrapped up in the organisation of their everyday lives. This shift in perspective is significant. It moves the focus of design from developing home network technologies that better support users' management of the home network and the devices that hang off it, to developing home network technologies that support household members' management of everyday life and the social activities that compose it. Through a range of ongoing ethnographic studies we elaborate this turn to the social, and a number of sensitising concerns informing the continued development of home network technologies.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Chamberlain, Alan, Crabtree, Andy, Rodden, Tom, Jones, Matt and Rogers, Yvonne (2012): Research in the wild: understanding 'in the wild' approaches to design and development. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 795-796.

We are starting to see a paradigm shift within the field of HCI. We are witnessing researchers leaving the safety and security of their controlled, lab-based environments and moving their research out into 'the wild'. Their studies are carrying out in-situ development and extended engagement, sampling experiences and working with communities in their homes and on the streets. This research has initially focused upon understanding the impacts that technological intervention has upon our day-to-day life and is leading us to explore the ways in which in-situ design, development and evaluation can be used to understand and explore these technological interventions. Is it the case that lab-based studies, taking people out of their natural environment and designing in the lab without long term user engagement are no longer appropriate to properly understand the impacts of technology in the real world?

© All rights reserved Chamberlain et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mortier, Richard, Rodden, Tom, Tolmie, Peter, Lodge, Tom, Spencer, Robert, Crabtree, Andy, Sventek, Joe and Koliousis, Alexandros (2012): Homework: putting interaction into the infrastructure. In: Proceedings of the 2012 ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2012. pp. 197-206.

This paper presents a user driven redesign of the domestic network infrastructure that draws upon a series of ethnographic studies of home networks. We present an infrastructure based around a purpose built access point that has modified the handling of protocols and services to reflect the interactive needs of the home. The developed infrastructure offers a novel measurement framework that allows a broad range of infrastructure information to be easily captured and made available to interactive applications. This is complemented by a diverse set of novel interactive control mechanisms and interfaces for the underlying infrastructure. We also briefly reflect on the technical and user issues arising from deployments.

© All rights reserved Mortier et al. and/or ACM Press

2009
 
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Grinter, Rebecca E., Edwards, W. Keith, Chetty, Marshini, Poole, Erika S., Sung, Ja-Young, Yang, Jeonghwa, Crabtree, Andy, Tolmie, Peter, Rodden, Tom, Greenhalgh, Chris and Benford, Steve (2009): The ins and outs of home networking: The case for useful and usable domestic networking. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 16 (2) p. 8.

Householders are increasingly adopting home networking as a solution to the demands created by the presence of multiple computers, devices, and the desire to access the Internet. However, current network solutions are derived from the world of work (and initially the military) and provide poor support for the needs of the home. We present the key findings to emerge from empirical studies of home networks in the UK and US. The studies reveal two key kinds of work that effective home networking relies upon: one, the technical work of setting up and maintaining the home network, and the other, the collaborative and socially organized work of the home which the network is embedded in and supports. The two are thoroughly intertwined and rely upon one another for their realization, yet neither is adequately supported by current networking technologies and applications. Explication of the "work to make the home network work" opens up the design space for the continued integration of the home network in domestic life and elaboration of future support. Key issues for development include the development of networking facilities that do not require advanced networking knowledge, that are flexible and support the local social order of the home and the evolution of its routines, and which ultimately make the home network visible and accountable to household members.

© All rights reserved Grinter et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Tolmie, Peter, Crabtree, Andy, Rodden, Tom and Benford, Steve (2008): "Are you watching this film or what?": interruption and the juggling of cohorts. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 257-266.

A proliferation of mobile devices in everyday life has increased the likelihood of technologically mediated interruptions. We examine ethnographic data from an SMS-based pervasive game in order to explicate the situated character of interruption. Ethnomethodological analysis of gameplay in the context of participants' everyday lives shows that interruption handling is shaped by its accountability to the various people or 'cohorts' whose concerns participants need to juggle simultaneously. Findings inform existing approaches to design where certain presuppositions regarding the nature of interruption prevail. Accordingly, we propose an approach to interruption handling that respects the ways in which people orient to and reason about interruptions locally in the conduct of situated action.

© All rights reserved Tolmie et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Tolmie, Peter and Crabtree, Andy (2008): Deploying research technology in the home. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 639-648.

Deploying research technology in real homes is an important way of uncovering new possibilities for design. We reflect upon the deployment of a simple technological arrangement which might be construed of as a 'breaching experiment' that reveals significant challenges for technology deployment in the home. Of particular issue is the extent to which research deployments resonate with existing infrastructure and disrupt ordinary processes of domestication; the degree of ownership household members exercise over research prototypes and how this constrains domestication; and the nature of research practice and the limits this places on our understanding of domestication.

© All rights reserved Tolmie and Crabtree and/or ACM Press

 
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Crabtree, Andy and Rodden, Tom (2008): Hybrid ecologies: understanding cooperative interaction in emerging physical-digital environments. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 12 (7) pp. 481-493.

2007
 
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Tolmie, Peter, Crabtree, Andy, Rodden, Tom, Greenhalgh, Chris and Benford, Steve (2007): Making the Home Network at Home: Digital Housekeeping. In: Proceedings of the Tenth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2007. pp. 331-350.

This paper exploits ethnographic findings to build on and elaborate Grinter et al's 2005 study of "the work to make the home network work". We focus particularly on the work involved in setting up and maintaining home networks, which we characterize as 'digital housekeeping'. Our studies reveal that it is through digital housekeeping that the home network is 'made at home' or made into an unremarkable and routine feature of domestic life. The orderly ways in which digital housekeeping 'gets done' elaborate a distinct 'social machinery' that highlights some important implications for the continued development of network technologies for the home. These include a requirement that designers take existing infrastructure into account and pay considerable attention to how future technologies may be incorporated into existing routines. The preoccupation of household members with making the home network transparent and accountable so that it is available to practical reasoning suggests designers should also consider the development of dedicated management interfaces to support digital housekeeping.

© All rights reserved Tolmie et al. and/or Springer

2006
 
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Benford, Steve, Crabtree, Andy, Reeves, Stuart, Sheridan, Jennifer, Dix, Alan J., Flintham, Martin and Drozd, Adam (2006): Designing for the opportunities and risks of staging digital experiences in public settings. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 427-436.

Mobile experiences that take place in public settings such as on city streets create new opportunities for interweaving the fictional world of a performance or game with the everyday physical world. A study of a touring performance reveals how designers generated excitement and dramatic tension by implicating bystanders and encouraging the (apparent) crossing of normal boundaries of behaviour. The study also shows how designers dealt with associated risks through a process of careful orchestration. Consequently, we extend an existing framework for designing spectator interfaces with the concept of performance frames, enabling us to distinguish audience from bystanders. We conclude that using ambiguity to blur the frame can be a powerful design tactic, empowering players to willingly suspend disbelief, so long as a safety-net of orchestration ensures that they do not stray into genuine difficulty.

© All rights reserved Benford et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Crabtree, Andy, O'Neill, Jacki, Tolmie, Peter, Castellani, Stefania, Colombino, Tommaso and Grasso, Antonietta (2006): The practical indispensability of articulation work to immediate and remote help-giving. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW06 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2006. pp. 219-228.

This paper argues that the design of remote help-giving systems should be grounded in articulation work and the methodical ways in which help-givers and help-seekers coordinate their problem solving activities. We provide examples from ethnographic studies of both immediate and remote help-giving to explicate what we mean by articulation work and to tease out common and characteristic methods involved in help-seeking and the giving of expert advice. We then outline how emerging technologies might best be used to support articulation work in the design and development of systems for remote troubleshooting of devices with embedded computing capabilities.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Reeves, Stuart, Pridmore, Tony, Crabtree, Andy, Green, Jonathan, Benford, Steve and O'Malley, Claire (2006): The spatial character of sensor technology. In: Proceedings of DIS06: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2006. pp. 31-40.

By considering the spatial character of sensor-based interactive systems, this paper investigates how discussions of seams and seamlessness in ubiquitous computing neglect the complex spatial character that is constructed as a side-effect of deploying sensor technology within a space. Through a study of a torch (aka 'flashlight') based interface, we develop a framework for analysing this spatial character generated by sensor technology. This framework is then used to analyse and compare a range of other systems in which sensor technology is used, in order to develop a design spectrum that contrasts the revealing and hiding of a system's structure to users. Finally, we discuss the implications for interfaces situated in public spaces and consider the benefits of hiding structure from users.

© All rights reserved Reeves et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Crabtree, Andy, Benford, Steve, Greenhalgh, Chris, Tennent, Paul, Chalmers, Matthew and Brown, Barry (2006): Supporting ethnographic studies of ubiquitous computing in the wild. In: Proceedings of DIS06: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2006. pp. 60-69.

Ethnography has become a staple feature of IT research over the last twenty years, shaping our understanding of the social character of computing systems and informing their design in a wide variety of settings. The emergence of ubiquitous computing raises new challenges for ethnography however, distributing interaction across a burgeoning array of small, mobile devices and online environments which exploit invisible sensing systems. Understanding interaction requires ethnographers to reconcile interactions that are, for example, distributed across devices on the street with online interactions in order to assemble coherent understandings of the social character and purchase of ubiquitous computing systems. We draw upon four recent studies to show how ethnographers are replaying system recordings of interaction alongside existing resources such as video recordings to do this and identify key challenges that need to be met to support ethnographic study of ubiquitous computing in the wild.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Crabtree, Andy, French, Andrew, Greenhalgh, Chris, Benford, Steve, Cheverst, Keith, Fitton, Dan, Rouncefield, Mark and Graham, Connor (2006): Developing Digital Records: Early Experiences of Record and Replay. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 15 (4) pp. 281-319.

In this paper we consider the development of 'digital records' to support ethnographic study of interaction and collaboration in ubiquitous computing environments and articulate the core concept of 'record and replay' through two case studies. One focuses on the utility of digital records, or records of interaction generated by a computer system, to ethnographic inquiry and highlights the mutually supportive nature of digital records and ethnographic methods. The other focuses on the work it takes to make digital records support ethnography, particularly the work of description and representation that is required to reconcile the fragmented character of interaction in ubiquitous computing environments. The work involved in 'making digital records work' highlights requirements for the design of tools to support the endeavour and informs the development of a Replay Tool. This tool enables ethnographers to visualize the data content of digital records; to extract sequences of relevance to analysis and remove non-relevant features; to marry recorded content with external resources, such as video; to add content from internal and external resources through annotation; and to reorder digital records to reflect the interactional order of events rather than the recorded order of events.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

 
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Benford, Steve, Crabtree, Andy, Flintham, Martin, Drozd, Adam, Anastasi, Rob, Paxton, Mark, Tandavanitj, Nick, Adams, Matt and Row-Farr, Ju (2006): Can you see me now?. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 13 (1) pp. 100-133.

We present a study of a mobile mixed reality game called Can You See Me Now? in which online players are chased through a virtual model of a city by 'runners' (professional performers equipped with GPS and WiFi technologies) who have to run through the actual city streets in order to catch the players. We present an ethnographic study of the game as it toured through two different cities and draws upon video recordings of online players, runners, technical support crew, and also on system logs of text communication. Our study reveals the diverse ways in which online players experienced the uncertainties inherent in GPS and WiFi, including being mostly unaware of them, but sometimes seeing them as problems, or treating the as a designed feature of the game, and even occasionally exploiting them within gameplay. In contrast, the runners and technical crew were fully aware of these uncertainties and continually battled against them through an ongoing and distributed process of orchestration. As a result, we encourage designers to deal with such uncertainties as a fundamental characteristic of location-based experiences rather than treating them as exceptions or bugs that might be ironed out in the future. We argue that designers should explicitly consider four potential states of being of a mobile participant: connected and tracked, connected but not tracked, tracked but not connected, and neither connected nor tracked. We then introduce five strategies that might be used to deal with uncertainty in these different states for different kinds of participant: remove it, hide it, manage it, reveal it, and exploit it. Finally, we present proposals for new orchestration interfaces that reveal the 'seams' in the underlying technical infrastructure by visualizing the recent performance of GPS and WiFi and predicting the likely future performance of GPS.

© All rights reserved Benford et al. and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Crabtree, Andy, Rodden, Tom and Benford, Steve (2005): Moving with the Times: IT Research and the Boundaries of CSCW. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 14 (3) pp. 217-251.

The field of CSCW research emerged with the development of distributed computing systems and attempts to understand the socially organized ('collaborative' or 'cooperative') nature of work in order to embed such systems in the workplace. As a field of interdisciplinary inquiry CSCW was motivated by technological developments and the need to understand the particular contexts within which those developments were intended to resonate. In other words, it is no mere accident that CSCW took work as its topic and resource - the historical nature of IT research from which the field emerged meant that for all practical purposes it could not be otherwise. Yet times change. IT research moves on. Today mobile, ambient, pervasive, ubiquitous, mixed reality and wearable computing, et cetera, are of fundamental concern to the contemporary computing research community. Furthermore, these developments are accompanied by a movement away from the workplace to focus on diverse settings in everyday life: homes, games, museums, photography, tourism, performances, indeed diverse bodies of people and pursuits that generally fall under the conceptual rubric of the 'ludic'. Accompanying this shift away from work is a call for new approaches and concepts that will enable researchers to better understand the ludic and inform design appropriately. In this paper we seek to address the boundaries of CSCW and the ability of CSCW to respond to contemporary research agendas. We present an ethnomethodological study of a location-based mixed reality game to demonstrate the continued relevance of CSCW approaches and concepts to contemporary agendas in IT research.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

 
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Ormerod, Thomas C., Mariani, John A., Morley, N. J., Rodden, Tom, Crabtree, Andy, Mathrick, J., Hitch, G. and Lewis, K. (2005): Mixing Research Methods in HCI: Ethnography Meets Experimentation in Image Browser Design. In: Bastide, Remi, Palanque, Philippe A. and Roth, Jörg (eds.) Engineering Human Computer Interaction and Interactive Systems, Joint Working Conferences EHCI-DSVIS 2004 July 11-13, 2005, Hamburg, Germany. pp. 112-128.

2004
 
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Crabtree, Andy, Benford, Steve, Rodden, Tom, Greenhalgh, Chris, Flintham, Martin, Anastasi, Rob, Drozd, Adam, Adams, Matt, Row-Farr, Ju, Tandavanitj, Nick and Steed, Anthony (2004): Orchestrating a mixed reality game 'on the ground'. In: Dykstra-Erickson, Elizabeth and Tscheligi, Manfred (eds.) Proceedings of ACM CHI 2004 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 24-29, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 391-398.

Successfully staging a mixed reality game in which online players are chased through a virtual city by runners located in the real world requires extensive orchestration work. An ethnographic study shows how this concerted achievement extends beyond the control room to the runners on the street. This, in turn, suggests the need to 'decentralize' orchestration and develop support for collaboration 'on the ground'. The study leads to design proposals for orchestration interfaces for mobile experiences that augment situational awareness and surreptitious monitoring among mobile participants and support troubleshooting in situations where participants are disconnected or are unable to access positioning systems such as GPS.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Crabtree, Andy, Rodden, Tom and Mariani, John (2004): Collaborating around collections: informing the continued development of photoware. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW04 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2004. pp. 396-405.

This paper explores the embodied interactional ways in which people naturally collaborate around and share collections of photographs. We employ ethnographic studies of paper-based photograph use to consider requirements for distributed collaboration around digital photographs. Distributed sharing is currently limited to the 'passing on' of photographs to others, by email, webpages, or mobile phones. To move beyond this, a fundamental challenge for photoware consists of developing support for the practical achievement of sharing 'at a distance'. Specifically, this entails augmenting the natural production of accounts or 'photo-talk' to support the distributed achievement of sharing.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Crabtree, Andy (2004): Design in the absence of practice: breaching experiments. In: Proceedings of DIS04: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2004. pp. 59-68.

IT research is often informed by studies of the practices that new technologies are to be embedded in and which they transform in their use. The development of mixed reality, tangible, ambient, ubiquitous, mobile, and wearable computing have seen the emergence of a range of technological innovations that have little or no grounding in current practices, however. Such developments create new practices where none existed before and the challenge for multi-disciplinary research is to adapt to this situation. This paper articulates a novel methodology that treats technological innovations as 'breaching experiments', whose situated use beyond the confines of the research lab may be studied ethnographically to support innovation.

© All rights reserved Crabtree and/or ACM Press

 
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Rodden, Tom, Crabtree, Andy, Hemmings, Terry, Koleva, Boriana, Humble, Jan, Akesson, Karl-Petter and Hansson, Par (2004): Between the dazzle of a new building and its eventual corpse: assembling the ubiquitous home. In: Proceedings of DIS04: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2004. pp. 71-80.

This paper presents the development of a lightweight component model that allows user to manage the introduction and arrangement of new interactive services and devices in the home. The model is responsive to ethnographic studies of the interplay between the Space-plan or interior layout and Stuff or artefacts placed within the fabric of the home. Interaction techniques developed through user-participation enable household members -- rather than designers -- to configure and reconfigure interactive devices and services to meet local needs. As a result, we have developed a tablet-based editor that discovers available ubiquitous components and presents these to users as 'jigsaw pieces' that can be dynamically assembled and recombined.

© All rights reserved Rodden et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Crabtree, Andy and Rodden, Tom (2004): Domestic Routines and Design for the Home. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 13 (2) pp. 191-220.

2003
 
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Flintham, Martin, Benford, Steve, Anastasi, Rob, Hemmings, Terry, Crabtree, Andy, Greenhalgh, Chris, Tandavanitj, Nick, Adams, Matt and Row-Farr, Ju (2003): Where on-line meets on the streets: experiences with mobile mixed reality games. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 569-576.

 
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Crabtree, Andy, Hemmings, T., Rodden, Tom and Mariani, J. (2003): Informing the development of calendar systems for domestic use. In: Proceedings of the Eighth European Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2003. pp. 119-138.

 
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Cheverst, Keith, Clarke, Karen, Fitton, Dan, Rouncefield, Mark, Crabtree, Andy and Hemmings, Terry (2003): SPAM on the menu: the practical use of remote messaging in community care. In: Proceedings of the 2003 ACM Conference on Universal Usability 2003. pp. 23-29.

This paper presents some early design work of the 'Digital Care' project, developing technologies to assist care in the community for user groups with different support needs. Our focus is on developing a SMS Public Asynchronous Messenger (SPAM) system for SMS messaging to a situated display in hostels for ex-psychiatric patients run by a charitable Trust. Such settings pose both methodological and design challenges. We face the methodological challenge to uncover requirements in such a sensitive domain by using ethnography, cultural probes and user workshops. The design challenge in this care setting is to provide support rather than new forms of dependence, and we report on early experiences of the deployed system.

© All rights reserved Cheverst et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Humble, Jan, Crabtree, Andy, Hemmings, Terry, Åkesson, Karl-Petter, Koleva, Boriana, Rodden, Tom and Hansson, Pär (2003): "Playing with the Bits" User-Configuration of Ubiquitous Domestic Environments. In: Dey, Anind K., Schmidt, Albrecht and McCarthy, Joseph F. (eds.) UbiComp 2003 Ubiquitous Computing - 5th International Conference October 12-15, 2003, Seattle, WA, USA. pp. 256-263.

 
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Crabtree, Andy, Rodden, Tom, Hemmings, Terry and Benford, Steve (2003): Finding a Place for UbiComp in the Home. In: Dey, Anind K., Schmidt, Albrecht and McCarthy, Joseph F. (eds.) UbiComp 2003 Ubiquitous Computing - 5th International Conference October 12-15, 2003, Seattle, WA, USA. pp. 208-226.

 
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Crabtree, Andy, Hemmings, Terry, Rodden, Tom, Cheverst, Keith, Clarke, Karen and Dewsbury, Guy (2003): Designing with Care: Adapting Cultural Probes to Inform Design in Sensitive Settings. In: Viller, Stephen and Wyeth, Peta (eds.) Proceedings of OzCHI 2003, New Directions in Interaction Information environments, Media and Technology November 26-28, 2003, Brisbane, Australia. pp. 4-13.

We report on the methodological process of developing computer support for former psychiatric patients living in residential care settings, for older members of the community, and disabled people living at home. Methods for identifying user needs in such sensitive settings are underdeveloped and the situation presents a very complex set of design challenges. In particular, the highly personal character of such settings presents conventional observational techniques, such as ethnography, with obdurate problems that make direct observation intrusive, disruptive and inappropriate on occasion. Direct observation requires supplementation in sensitive settings. Accordingly, we report on our experiences of adapting Cultural Probes to explore care settings, to develop a design dialogue with participants, and to gather information about their unique needs.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or University of Queensland

 Cited in the following chapter:

Design 4 All: [/encyclopedia/design_4_all.html]


 
2002
 
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Crabtree, Andy, Hemmings, Terry and Rodden, Tom (2002): Pattern-based support for interactive design in domestic settings. In: Proceedings of DIS02: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2002. pp. 265-276.

Designing for future domestic environments offers a challenge for everyone involved in the design of new technologies. The move from the office, and working environments in general, has highlighted the need for new techniques for understanding the home and conveying findings to technology developers. This paper presents a pattern-based approach informing the design of technology for future domestic settings. The approach is based on the original work of Alexander and seeks to support the on-going process of design, rather than the structuring of a corpus of previous work. The paper presents an adapted pattern language framework for structuring and presenting ethnographic fieldwork and considers the broad implications of patterns for the development of new technologies for domestic settings.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Crabtree, Andy, Rodden, Tom and Mariani, John A. (2002): Designing Virtual Environments to Support Cooperation in the Real World. In Virtual Reality, 6 (2) pp. 63-74.

2000
 
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Crabtree, Andy (2000): Talking Work: Language-games, Organisations and Computer Supported Cooperative Work. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 9 (2) pp. 215-237.

distributed organisations, ethnography, instances, language-game, mapping grammar, problem-solution space for design

© All rights reserved Crabtree and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

 
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Crabtree, Andy, Nichols, David M., O'Brien, Jon, Rouncefield, Mark and Twidale, Michael (2000): Ethnomethodologically informed ethnography and information system design. In JASIST - Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 51 (7) pp. 666-682.

 
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Crabtree, Andy (2000): Methodological Issues Concerning the Practical Availability of Work-Practice to EM & CA. In: The 2nd Workplace Studies Conference October 27, 2000, Manchester, United Kingdom. .

Ethnomethodology and Conversation Analysis are often talked of interchangeably, in the same breath, as being the same kind of ‘thing', entertaining similar concerns, engaged in the empirical investigation of members construction of social reality, inspecting, exploring, and scrutinising the production of real world, real time phenomenon in doing so, sharing similar methodological presumptions in undertaking that work, and the rest. The presupposition of ‘sameness' glosses and obscures, however, significant differences which set the two enterprises apart as distinct forms of socio-logical study and raises methodological issues concerning the practical availability of human work-practice to the two fields of inquiry? These are issues which Jeff Coulter, a leading figure in the field, recently described as “important in determining the future course of ethnomethodological studies”.

© All rights reserved Crabtree and/or his/her publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Ethnography: [/encyclopedia/ethnography.html]


 
1997
 
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Crabtree, Andy, Twidale, Michael B., O'Brien, Jon and Nichols, David M. (1997): Talking in the Library: Implications for the Design of Digital Libraries. In: DL97: Proceedings of the 2nd ACM International Conference on Digital Libraries 1997. pp. 221-228.

We describe the use of ethnomethodologically-informed ethnography as a means of informing the requirements elicitation, design, development and evaluation of digital libraries. We present the case for the contribution of such studies to the development of digital library technology to support the practices of information-searching. This is illustrated by a particular study of the help desk at a university library, examining the implications it has for designing appropriate functionality for a digital library. This requires us to address the problems of using ethnographic data in systems design.

© All rights reserved Crabtree et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/andy_crabtree.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1997-2012
Pub. count:34
Number of co-authors:67



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Tom Rodden:20
Steve Benford:13
Peter Tolmie:8

 

 

Productive colleagues

Andy Crabtree's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Steve Benford:121
Alan J. Dix:107
Tom Rodden:106
 
 
 
Jul 13

A general principle for all user interface design is to go through all of your design elements and remove them one at a time. If the design works as well without a certain design element, kill it.

-- Jakob Nielsen, Designing Web Usability, p. 22.

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

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