Publication statistics

Pub. period:1994-2012
Pub. count:48
Number of co-authors:88



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Antonio Kruger:8
Sebastian Boring:8
Antonio Krüger:7

 

 

Productive colleagues

Andreas Butz's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Saul Greenberg:140
Albrecht Schmidt:110
Steven K. Feiner:76
 
 
 
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Publications by Andreas Butz (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Echtler, Florian and Butz, Andreas (2012): GISpL: gestures made easy. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2012. pp. 233-240.

We present GISpL, the Gestural Interface Specification Language. GISpL is a formal language which allows both researchers and developers to unambiguously describe the behavior of a wide range of gestural interfaces using a simple JSON-based syntax. GISpL supports a multitude of input modalities, including multi-touch, digital pens, multiple regular mice, tangible interfaces or mid-air gestures. GISpL introduces a novel view on gestural interfaces from a software-engineering perspective. By using GISpL, developers can avoid tedious tasks such as reimplementing the same gesture recognition algorithms over and over again. Researchers benefit from the ability to quickly reconfigure prototypes of gestural UIs on-the-fly, possibly even in the middle of an expert review. In this paper, we present a brief overview of GISpL as well as some usage examples of our reference implementation. We demonstrate its capabilities by the example of a multichannel audio mixer application being used with several different input modalities. Moreover, we present exemplary GISpL descriptions of other gestural interfaces and conclude by discussing its potential applications and future development.

© All rights reserved Echtler and Butz and/or ACM Press

 
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Hausen, Doris, Boring, Sebastian, Lueling, Clara, Rodestock, Simone and Butz, Andreas (2012): StaTube: facilitating state management in instant messaging systems. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2012. pp. 283-290.

Instant messaging systems, such as Skype, offer text, audio and video channels for one-on-one and group conversations, both for personal and professional communication. They are commonly used at a distance, i.e., across countries and continents. To avoid disrupting other tasks, they display personal states to signal others when to contact someone and when not. This mechanism, however, heavily relies on users setting their own state correctly. In an online survey with 46 participants we found that neglecting state updates leads to unwanted messages, either because the state is incorrect or others disrespect it because they assume it to be wrong anyway. We address this situation with the StaTube, a tangible object offering (1) peripheral interaction for setting one's own state and (2) peripheral awareness of selected others' state. In an in-situ evaluation we found first indicators that (1) peripheral interaction fosters more frequent state updates and more accurate state information, and (2) that our participants felt more aware of their contacts' states due to the physical ambient representation.

© All rights reserved Hausen et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hennecke, Fabian, Wimmer, Raphael, Vodicka, Eduard and Butz, Andreas (2012): Vertibles: using vacuum self-adhesion to create a tangible user interface for arbitrary interactive surfaces. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2012. pp. 303-306.

We present Vertibles, a set of Tangible User Interface (TUI) objects employing a vacuum-based adhesion effect. This effect allows attaching them to arbitrarily inclined surfaces, bringing the benefit of TUIs to vertical interactive surfaces. In contrast to other vertically attachable TUIs, Vertibles stick to a wide range of surface materials and work with optical as well as electric object tracking techniques for interactive surfaces. We present an overview of approaches for sticking objects onto vertical surfaces, describe the technical principle and properties of our solution, and document implementation details of a number of Vertibles prototypes.

© All rights reserved Hennecke et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Wiethoff, Alexander, Schneider, Hanna, Rohs, Michael, Butz, Andreas and Greenberg, Saul (2012): Sketch-a-TUI: low cost prototyping of tangible interactions using cardboard and conductive ink. In: Proceedings of the 6th International Conference on Tangible and Embedded Interaction 2012. pp. 309-312.

Graspable tangibles are now being explored on the current generation of capacitive touch surfaces, such as the iPad and the Android tablet. Because the size and form factor is relatively new, early and low fidelity prototyping of these TUIs is crucial in getting the right design. The problem is that it is difficult for the average interaction designer to develop such physical prototypes. They require a substantial amount time and effort to physically model the tangibles, and expertise in electronics to instrument them. Thus prototyping is sometimes handed off to specialists, or is limited to only a few design iterations and alternative designs. Our solution contributes a low fidelity prototyping approach that is time and cost effective, and that requires no electronics knowledge. First, we supply non-specialists with cardboard forms to create tangibles. Second, we have them draw lines on it via conductive ink, which makes their objects recognizable by the capacitive touch screen. They can then apply routine programming to recognize these tangibles and thus iterate over various designs.

© All rights reserved Wiethoff et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Knobel, Martin, Hassenzahl, Marc, Lamara, Melanie, Sattler, Tobias, Schumann, Josef, Eckoldt, Kai and Butz, Andreas (2012): Clique Trip: feeling related in different cars. In: Proceedings of DIS12 Designing Interactive Systems 2012. pp. 29-37.

Contemporary car design must not only focus on technology supporting the driver and the driving task: it needs to create positive experiences for drivers and passengers alike. This case study, the Clique Trip, is an example of designing a positive social (i.e. relatedness) experience in the automotive context, addressing the analysis, the design, and the evaluation of the experience. The Clique Trip experience creates a feeling of closeness and relatedness among friends when being in a "motorcade". It is derived from experience reports, implemented in the car and evaluated on the road. Qualitative and quantitative results revealed its capability to create the targeted social experience.

© All rights reserved Knobel et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Richter, Hendrik, Hausen, Doris, Osterwald, Sven and Butz, Andreas (2012): Reproducing materials of virtual elements on touchscreens using supplemental thermal feedback. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2012. pp. 385-392.

In our everyday life, the perception of thermal cues plays a crucial role for the identification and discrimination of materials. When touching an object, the change of temperature in the skin of our fingertips is characteristic for the touched material and can help to discriminate objects with the same texture or hardness. However, this useful perceptual channel is disregarded for interactive elements on standard touchscreens. In this paper, we present a study in which we compared the rate of object discrimination for stand-alone thermal stimuli as well as supplemental thermal stimuli characterizing virtual materials on a touchscreen. Our results show that five materials could be discriminated at a stable rate using either stand-alone or supplemental thermal stimuli. They suggest that thermal cues can enable material discrimination on touch surfaces, which gives way for expanded use of thermal stimuli on interactive surfaces.

© All rights reserved Richter et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Sedlmair, Michael, Isenberg, Petra, Baur, Dominikus, Mauerer, Michael, Pigorsch, Christian and Butz, Andreas (2011): Cardiogram: visual analytics for automotive engineers. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 1727-1736.

We present Cardiogram, a visual analytics system that supports automotive engineers in debugging masses of traces each consisting of millions of recorded messages from in-car communication networks. With their increasing complexity, ensuring these safety-critical networks to be error-free has become a major task and challenge for automotive engineers. To overcome shortcomings of current analysis tools, Cardiogram combines visualization techniques with a data preprocessing approach to automatically reduce complexity based on engineers' domain knowledge. In this paper, we provide the findings from an exploratory, three-year field study within a large automotive company, studying current practices of engineers, the challenges they meet and the characteristics for integrating novel visual analytics tools into their work practices. We then introduce Cardiogram, discuss how our field analysis influenced our design decisions, and present a qualitative, long-term, in-depth evaluation. Results of this study showed that our participants successfully used Cardiogram to increase the amount of analyzable information, to externalize domain knowledge, and to provide new insights into trace data. Our design approach finally led to the adoption of Cardiogram into engineers' daily practices.

© All rights reserved Sedlmair et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Boring, Sebastian, Gehring, Sven, Wiethoff, Alexander, Blöckner, Anna Magdalena, Schöning, Johannes and Butz, Andreas (2011): Multi-user interaction on media facades through live video on mobile devices. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2721-2724.

The increasing number of media facades in urban spaces offers great potential for new forms of interaction especially for collaborative multi-user scenarios. In this paper, we present a way to directly interact with them through live video on mobile devices. We extend the Touch Projector interface to accommodate multiple users by showing individual content on the mobile display that would otherwise clutter the facade's canvas or distract other users. To demonstrate our concept, we built two collaborative multi-user applications: (1) painting on the facade and (2) solving a 15-puzzle. We gathered informal feedback during the ARS Electronica Festival in Linz, Austria and found that our interaction technique is (1) considered easy-to-learn, but (2) may leave users unaware of the actions of others.

© All rights reserved Boring et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hennecke, Fabian, Berwein, Franz and Butz, Andreas (2011): Optical pressure sensing for tangible user interfaces. In: Proceedings of the 2011 ACM International Conference on Interactive Tabletops and Surfaces 2011. pp. 45-48.

In this paper we present a low cost pressure sensing method for Tangible User Interface (TUI) objects on interactive surfaces, using conventional FTIR and DI tracking. While current TUIs use optical tracking for an object's position and orientation, they rely on mechanical or electric enhancements to enable sensing of other input parameters such as pressure. Our approach uses dedicated marker pads for pressure sensing embedded into an optical marker pattern for position and orientation tracking. Two different marker designs allow different precision levels: Number of Contacts (NoC) allows click sensing and Area of Contact (AoC) enables continuous pressure sensing. We describe the working principles of the marker patterns and the construction of the corresponding tangible objects. We have tested continuous pressure sensing in a preliminary user study and will also discuss limitations of our approach.

© All rights reserved Hennecke et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Ecker, Ronald, Holzer, Philipp, Broy, Verena and Butz, Andreas (2011): EcoChallenge: a race for efficiency. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 91-94.

Careful use of the limited remaining fossil energy resources is important for both ecological and economical reasons. In addition to technical improvements, fuel consumption of a vehicle is influenced significantly by the driving behavior. Currently, only few in-car user interfaces are trying to promote a more fuel-efficient driving behavior. We propose EcoChallenge, a community- and location-based in-car persuasive game with the goal to motivate and support a behavioral change towards a fuel-saving driving style. We implemented and integrated EcoChallenge in an experimental vehicle and evaluated it in a field study. The results regarding acceleration, deceleration, breaking and coasting show the effectiveness of our approach. In addition, users confirmed a very positive experience with our system.

© All rights reserved Ecker et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Richter, Hendrik, Blaha, Benedikt, Wiethoff, Alexander, Baur, Dominikus and Butz, Andreas (2011): Tactile feedback without a big fuss: simple actuators for high-resolution phantom sensations. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 85-88.

Multi-touch screens and surfaces for manipulating digital content play a crucial role in mobile and ubiquitous computing. Augmenting these interactive surfaces with tactile feedback has been found to increase interaction speed, reduce operating errors and minimize visual and cognitive load. Communicating detailed tactile characteristics of virtual elements, however, requires complex electromechanical or electrostatic actuator setups. This increase in complexity makes tactile interfaces intricate, costly or poorly scalable. In order to provide sophisticated tactile sensations with simple actuator technology, we exploit a haptic psychophysical phenomenon called Phantom Sensation. We present a comparison of three standard tactile actuator technologies to see which one can recreate the Phantom Sensation with maximum effect. Our results show the way to a simple and scalable implementation of illusion-based tactile feedback for interactive surfaces. We explore the notion of the Phantom Sensation and its possible applications within a ubicomp scenario.

© All rights reserved Richter et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Wimmer, Raphael, Hennecke, Fabian, Schulz, Florian, Boring, Sebastian, Butz, Andreas and Hußmann, Heinrich (2010): Curve: revisiting the digital desk. In: Proceedings of the Sixth Nordic Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2010. pp. 561-570.

Current desktop workspace environments consist of a vertical area (e.g., a screen with a virtual desktop) and a horizontal area (e.g., the physical desk). Daily working activities benefit from different intrinsic properties of both of these areas. However, both areas are distinct from each other, making data exchange between them cumbersome. Therefore, we present Curve, a novel interactive desktop environment, which combines advantages of vertical and horizontal working areas using a continuous curved connection. This connection offers new ways of direct multi-touch interaction and new ways of information visualization. We describe our basic design, the ergonomic adaptations we made, and discuss technical challenges we met and expect to meet while building and configuring the system.

© All rights reserved Wimmer et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Boring, Sebastian, Baur, Dominikus, Butz, Andreas, Gustafson, Sean and Baudisch, Patrick (2010): Touch projector: mobile interaction through video. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2287-2296.

In 1992, Tani et al. proposed remotely operating machines in a factory by manipulating a live video image on a computer screen. In this paper we revisit this metaphor and investigate its suitability for mobile use. We present Touch Projector, a system that enables users to interact with remote screens through a live video image on their mobile device. The handheld device tracks itself with respect to the surrounding displays. Touch on the video image is "projected" onto the target display in view, as if it had occurred there. This literal adaptation of Tani's idea, however, fails because handheld video does not offer enough stability and control to enable precise manipulation. We address this with a series of improvements, including zooming and freezing the video image. In a user study, participants selected targets and dragged targets between displays using the literal and three improved versions. We found that participants achieved highest performance with automatic zooming and temporary image freezing.

© All rights reserved Boring et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Baur, Dominikus, Boring, Sebastian and Butz, Andreas (2010): Rush: repeated recommendations on mobile devices. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2010. pp. 91-100.

We present rush as a recommendation-based interaction and visualization technique for repeated item selection from large data sets on mobile touch screen devices. Proposals and choices are intertwined in a continuous finger gesture navigating a two-dimensional canvas of recommended items. This provides users with more flexibility for the resulting selections. Our design is based on a formative user study regarding orientation and occlusion aspects. Subsequently, we implemented a version of rush for music playlist creation. In an experimental evaluation we compared different types of recommendations based on similarity, namely the top 5 most similar items, five random selections from the list of similar items and a hybrid version of the two. Participants had to create playlists using each condition. Our results show that top 5 was too restricting, while random and hybrid suggestions had comparable results.

© All rights reserved Baur et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Chen, Ya-Xi, Reiter, Michael and Butz, Andreas (2010): PhotoMagnets: supporting flexible browsing and searching in photo collections. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Multimodal Interfaces 2010. p. 25.

People's activities around their photo collections are often highly dynamic and unstructured, such as casual browsing and searching or loosely structured storytelling. User interfaces to support such an exploratory behavior are a challenging research question. We explore ways to enhance the flexibility in dealing with photo collections and designed a system named PhotoMagnets. It uses a magnet metaphor in addition to more traditional interface elements in order to support a flexible combination of structured and unstructured photo browsing and searching. In an evaluation we received positive feedback especially on the flexibility provided by this approach.

© All rights reserved Chen et al. and/or ACM Press

2009
 
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Chen, Ya-Xi and Butz, Andreas (2009): Musicsim: integrating audio analysis and user feedback in an interactive music browsing ui. In: Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2009. pp. 429-434.

In music information retrieval (MIR), there are two main research directions, which are based either on a folder hierarchy and metadata, or on the actual acoustic content. We believe that both content-based and hierarchy-based retrieval have their respective strengths for browsing and organizing music collections, and that the integration of content analysis techniques in metadata-based media UIs can lead to more powerful UIs. In this paper we present a prototype, in which audio analysis techniques and user feedback are integrated into an interactive UI for browsing and organizing large music collections. We also provide visual assistance to support non-visual perception of music. We discussed our system with test users and received encouragement as well as valuable suggestions for future re-search.

© All rights reserved Chen and Butz and/or their publisher

 
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Baur, Dominikus and Butz, Andreas (2009): Pulling strings from a tangle: visualizing a personal music listening history. In: Proceedings of the 2009 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2009. pp. 439-444.

The history of songs, to which a person has listened, is a very personal piece of information. It is a rich data set that comes as a byproduct of the use of digital music players and can be obtained without interfering with the user. In this paper, we present three visualizations for this data set and a mechanism for generating new playlists from the user's own listening history, based on a navigation metaphor. First, temporal proximity is interpreted as a simple similarity measure to lay out the entire history on a two-dimensional plane. Closed listening sessions are then used to make chronological relations visible. The generated playlists mimic the user's previous listening behavior, and the visualizations make the automatic choices understandable, as they share visual properties with the history. In this sense, our visualizations provide a visual vocabulary for listening behaviors and bring scrutability to automatic playlist generation.

© All rights reserved Baur and Butz and/or their publisher

 
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Ecker, Ronald, Broy, Verena, Butz, Andreas and Luca, Alexander De (2009): pieTouch: a direct touch gesture interface for interacting with in-vehicle information systems. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 22.

Touch-sensitive displays seem like a natural and promising option for dealing with the increasing complexity of current in-vehicle information systems (IVIS), but since they can hardly be used without visual attention conventional point touch systems are rarely considered in cars. To ensure road safety, the drivers' visual attention needs to be focused almost entirely to the road. In order to integrate touch screens successfully into cars, new concepts are needed to reduce visual demand. The adaptation of pie menus serving as a visualisation of gestures reduces the user's cognitive load, and we were able to achieve an almost blind interaction with the IVIS. We compared our design to a generic touch system using a dual task evaluation method (Lane Change Task [18][20]), and the results regarding total task completion time, lane deviation and subjective preferences confirm a higher usability and efficiency, as well as an added hedonic quality of pieTouch.

© All rights reserved Ecker et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Broll, Gregor, Keck, Susanne, Holleis, Paul and Butz, Andreas (2009): Improving the accessibility of NFC/RFID-based mobile interaction through learnability and guidance. In: Proceedings of 11th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2009. p. 37.

NFC and RFID technologies have found their way into current mobile phones and research has presented a variety of applications using NFC/RFID tags for interaction between physical objects and mobile devices. Since this type of interaction is widely novel for most users, there is a considerable initial inhibition threshold for them. In order to get novice users started with this physical interaction and its applications, we have designed different ways to increase the learnability and guidance of such applications. Their effectiveness was evaluated in a qualitative and quantitative user study with 40 participants, who interacted with NFC-equipped posters in different ways. We report on the types of usage errors observed and show that future designs of NFC/RFID-based mobile applications should consider using a dedicated start-tag for interaction.

© All rights reserved Broll et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Boring, Sebastian, Jurmu, Marko and Butz, Andreas (2009): Scroll, tilt or move it: using mobile phones to continuously control pointers on large public displays. In: Proceedings of OZCHI09, the CHISIG Annual Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 2009. pp. 161-168.

Large and public displays mostly provide little interactivity due to technical constraints, making it difficult for people to capture interesting information or to influence the screen's content. Through the combination of largescale visual output and the mobile phone as an input device, bidirectional interaction with large public displays can be enabled. In this paper, we propose and compare three different interaction techniques (Scroll, Tilt and Move) for continuous control of a pointer located on a remote display using a mobile phone. Since each of these techniques seemed to have arguments for and against them, we conducted a comparative evaluation and discovered their specific strengths and weaknesses. We report the implementation of the techniques, their design and results of our user study. The experiment revealed that while Move and Tilt can be faster, they also introduce higher error rates for selection tasks.

© All rights reserved Boring et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Hilliges, Otmar, Izadi, Shahram, Wilson, Andrew D., Hodges, Steve, Garcia-Mendoza, Armando and Butz, Andreas (2009): Interactions in the air: adding further depth to interactive tabletops. In: Proceedings of the ACM Symposium on User Interface Software and Technology 2009. pp. 139-148.

Although interactive surfaces have many unique and compelling qualities, the interactions they support are by their very nature bound to the display surface. In this paper we present a technique for users to seamlessly switch between interacting on the tabletop surface to above it. Our aim is to leverage the space above the surface in combination with the regular tabletop display to allow more intuitive manipulation of digital content in three-dimensions. Our goal is to design a technique that closely resembles the ways we manipulate physical objects in the real-world; conceptually, allowing virtual objects to be 'picked up' off the tabletop surface in order to manipulate their three dimensional position or orientation. We chart the evolution of this technique, implemented on two rear projection-vision tabletops. Both use special projection screen materials to allow sensing at significant depths beyond the display. Existing and new computer vision techniques are used to sense hand gestures and postures above the tabletop, which can be used alongside more familiar multi-touch interactions. Interacting above the surface in this way opens up many interesting challenges. In particular it breaks the direct interaction metaphor that most tabletops afford. We present a novel shadow-based technique to help alleviate this issue. We discuss the strengths and limitations of our technique based on our own observations and initial user feedback, and provide various insights from comparing, and contrasting, our tabletop implementations.

© All rights reserved Hilliges et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Sedlmair, Michael, Hintermaier, Wolfgang, Stocker, Konrad, Bring, Thorsten and Butz, Andreas (2008): A Dual-View Visualization of In-Car Communication Processes. In: IV 2008 - 12th International Conference on Information Visualisation 8-11 July, 2008, London, UK. pp. 157-162.

 
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Terrenghi, Lucia, Kirk, David, Richter, Hendrik, Krämer, Sebastian, Hilliges, Otmar and Butz, Andreas (2008): Physical handles at the interactive surface: exploring tangibility and its benefits. In: Levialdi, Stefano (ed.) AVI 2008 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces May 28-30, 2008, Napoli, Italy. pp. 138-145.

2007
 
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Hilliges, Otmar, Terrenghi, Lucia, Boring, Sebastian, Kim, David, Richter, Hendrik and Butz, Andreas (2007): Designing for collaborative creative problem solving. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on Creativity and Cognition 2007, Washington DC, USA. pp. 137-146.

Collaborative creativity is traditionally supported by formal techniques, such as brainstorming. These techniques improve the idea-generation process by creating group synergies, but also suffer from a number of negative effects. Current electronic tools to support collaborative creativity overcome some of these problems, but introduce new ones, by either losing the benefits of face-to-face communication or the immediacy of simultaneous contribution. Using an interactive environment as a test bed, we are investigating how collaborative creativity can be supported electronically while maintaining face-to-face communication. What are the design-factors influencing such a system? We have designed a brainstorming application that uses an interactive table and a large wall display, and compared the results of using it to traditional paper-based brainstorming in a user study with 30 participants. From the considerations that went into the design and the observations during the study we derive a number of design guidelines for collaborative systems in interactive environments.

© All rights reserved Hilliges et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Butz, Andreas, Fisher, Brian D., Krüger, Antonio and Olivier, Patrick (eds.) (2007): Lecture Notes in Computer Science: Smart graphics 7th international symposium. Heidelberg, Springer-Verlag

 
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Hilliges, Otmar, Baur, Dominikus and Butz, Andreas (2007): Photohelix: Browsing, Sorting and Sharing Digital Photo Collections. In: Second IEEE International Workshop on Horizontal Interactive Human-Computer Systems Tabletop 2007 October 10-12, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 87-94.

 
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Eisendle, Carmen, Schnappinger, Christine, Guminski, Karin and Butz, Andreas (2007): Design and Evaluation of an Interactive Children's Book. In: Gross, Tom (ed.) Mensch and Computer 2007 September 2-5, 2007, Weimar, Germany. pp. 169-178.

 
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Terrenghi, Lucia, Hilliges, Otmar and Butz, Andreas (2007): Kitchen stories: sharing recipes with the Living Cookbook. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 11 (5) pp. 409-414.

 
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Hilliges, Otmar, Kunath, Peter, Pryakhin, Alexey, Butz, Andreas and Kriegel, Hans-Peter (2007): Browsing and Sorting Digital Pictures Using Automatic Image Classification and Quality Analysis. In: Jacko, Julie A. (ed.) HCI International 2007 - 12th International Conference - Part III 2007. pp. 882-891.

 
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Boring, Sebastian, Hilliges, Otmar and Butz, Andreas (2007): A Wall-Sized Focus Plus Context Display. In: PerCom 2007 - Fifth Annual IEEE International Conference on Pervasive Computing and Communications 19-23 March, 2007, White Plains, New York, USA. pp. 161-170.

2006
 
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Butz, Andreas, Kray, Christian, Kruger, Antonio and Schwesig, Carsten (2006): Workshop W2: multi-user and ubiquitous user interfaces (MU3I 2006). In: Proceedings of the 2006 International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2006. p. 15.

The main objective of the third workshop on Multi-User and Ubiquitous User Interfaces (MU3I 2006) is to bring people with relevant backgrounds (e.g. interface design, CSCW, ubiquitous computing) together to discuss two key questions in this field: How can we build interfaces, which span multiple devices so that the user knows that they can be used to control a specific application? How can we build interfaces for public displays? Therefore, the main outcome of the workshop is expected to consists of further insights into those problems, potential solutions and a research agenda to investigate these further.

© All rights reserved Butz et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Butz, Andreas, Fisher, Brian D., Krüger, Antonio and Olivier, Patrick (eds.) (2006): Lecture Notes in Computer Science: Smart graphics : 6th international symposium. Berlin, Heidelberg, New York. , Springer-Verlag

 
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Butz, Andreas, Fisher, Brian D., Kruger, Antonio and Olivier, Patrick (eds.) Proceedings of the Sixth International Symposium on Smart Graphics July 23-25, 2006, Vancouver, Canada.

 
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Butz, Andreas and Krüger, Antonio (2006): Applying the Peephole Metaphor in a Mixed-Reality Room. In IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, 26 (1) pp. 56-63.

2005
 
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Butz, Andreas, Schmitz, Michael, Kruger, Antonio and Hullmann, Harald (2005): Tangible UIs for media control: probes into the design space. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 957-971.

In a student project over the summer of 2004 teams of computer science and product design students worked together to develop new forms of interfaces for media control in living room contexts. In this paper we describe the design process from collecting first ideas of design choices and iteratively evolving (low- fidelity) prototypes to fully functional products, partially even meeting mass production requirements. We discuss how the interdisciplinary collaboration influenced the creative process in such a way, that the solutions were more realistic than purely design- informed solutions and more inspired than purely technology- informed ones. We experienced that the combination of skills lead to a much more focused design process, which produced fully functional prototypes in a short time. The resulting designs include one interface installed in the room, two autonomous interaction objects which can be freely moved around, and a two- handed inter- face. While these are only small spotlights into a large design space, they nicely show the possible diversity. We also learned that fully functional and aesthetically pleasing prototypes can be developed with technologically relatively simple means.

© All rights reserved Butz et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Butz, Andreas, Fisher, Brian D., Krüger, Antonio and Olivier, Patrick (2005): Lecture Notes in Computer Science: Smart graphics : 5th international symposium. Berlin ,Heidelberg, New York, Springer-Verlag

 
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Butz, Andreas, Kray, Christian, Krüger, Antonio, Schmidt, Albrecht and Prendinger, Helmut (eds.) Proceedings of the 2nd Workshop on Multi-User and Ubiquitous User Interfaces MU3I January 9, 2005, San Diego, USA.

 
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Reiter, Dennis and Butz, Andreas (2005): Design and Implementation of a Widget Set for Steerable Projector-Camera Units. In: Fourth IEEE and ACM International Symposium on Mixed and Augmented Reality ISMAR 2005 5-8 October, 2005, Vienna, Austria. pp. 216-217.

2004
 
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Kruger, Antonio, Butz, Andreas, Muller, Christian, Stahl, Christoph, Wasinger, Rainer, Steinberg, Karl-Ernst and Dirschl, Andreas (2004): The connected user interface: realizing a personal situated navigation service. In: Nunes, Nuno Jardim and Rich, Charles (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2004 January 13-16, 2004, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal. pp. 161-168.

Navigation services can be found in different situations and contexts: while connected to the web through a desktop PC, in cars, and more recently on PDAs while on foot. These services are usually well designed for their specific purpose, but fail to work in other situations. In this paper we present an approach that connects a variety of specialized user interfaces to achieve a personal navigation service spanning different situations. We describe the concepts behind the bf BPN (BMW Personal Navigator), an entirely implemented system that combines a desktop event and route planner, a car navigation system, and a multi-modal, in- and outdoor pedestrian navigation system for a PDA. Rather than designing for one unified UI, we focus on connecting specialized UIs for desktop, in-car and on-foot use.

© All rights reserved Kruger et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Butz, Andreas, Gross, Markus H. and Kruger, Antonio (2004): TUISTER: a tangible UI for hierarchical structures. In: Nunes, Nuno Jardim and Rich, Charles (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2004 January 13-16, 2004, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal. pp. 223-225.

Tangible user interfaces provide access to virtual information through intuitive physical manipulation. However, feedback is mostly provided by displays in the environment instead of the TUI itself. In this paper we describe the design of Tuister, a tangible user interface with multiple embedded displays and sensors. We explain how Tuister can be used to browse and access hierarchical structures and briefly describe the current state of a prototype we're building.

© All rights reserved Butz et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Butz, Andreas, Kruger, Antonio, Kray, Christian and Schmidt, Albrecht (2004): Workshop W5: multi-user and ubiquitous user interfaces (MU3I). In: Nunes, Nuno Jardim and Rich, Charles (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2004 January 13-16, 2004, Funchal, Madeira, Portugal. pp. 378-379.

The workshop on Multi-User and Ubiquitous User Interfaces (MU3I) discusses examples of and principles underlying user interfaces for ubiquitous computing and multi-user interfaces. It raises issues such as interface adaptation, resource limitations, and novel interaction techniques. The workshop is held as a full day event and the papers were reviewed by an international program committee. Online proceedings are available at http://www.mu3i.org/.

© All rights reserved Butz et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Butz, Andreas, Schneider, Michael and Spassova, Mira (2004): SearchLight - A Lightweight Search Function for Pervasive Environments. In: Ferscha, Alois and Mattern, Friedemann (eds.) PERVASIVE 2004 - Pervasive Computing, Second International Conference April 21-23, 2004, Vienna, Austria. pp. 351-356.

2002
 
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Bohnenberger, Thorsten, Jameson, Anthony, Kruger, Antonio and Butz, Andreas (2002): User acceptance of a decision-theoretic location-aware shopping guide. In: Gil, Yolanda and Leake, David (eds.) International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2002 January 13-16, 2002, San Francisco, California, USA. pp. 178-179.

We are exploring a class of decision-theoretic handheld systems that give a user personalized advice about how to explore an indoor area in search of products or information. An initial user test in a simple mockup of a shopping mall showed that even novice PDA users accepted the system immediately and were able to achieve their shopping goals faster than when using a paper map of the mall. A key issue is the extent to which spontaneous user behavior can be accommodated within this framework.

© All rights reserved Bohnenberger et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bohnenberger, Thorsten, Jameson, Anthony, Krüger, Antonio and Butz, Andreas (2002): Location-Aware Shopping Assistance: Evaluation of a Decision-Theoretic Approach. In: Paterno, Fabio (ed.) Mobile Human-Computer Interaction - 4th International Symposium - Mobile HCI 2002 September 18-20, 2002, Pisa, Italy. pp. 155-169.

2001
 
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Butz, Andreas, Baus, Jorg, Kruger, Antonio and Lohse, Marco (2001): A Hybrid Indoor Navigation System. In: International Conference on Intelligent User Interfaces 2001 January 14-17, 2001, Sanata Fe, New Mexico, USA. pp. 25-32.

We describe a hybrid building navigation system consisting of stationary information booths and a mobile communication infrastructure feeding small portable devices. The graphical presentations for both the booths and the mobile devices are generated from a common source and for the common task of way finding, but they use different techniques to convey possibly different subsets of the relevant information. The form of the presentations is depending on technical limitations of the output media, accuracy of location information, and cognitive restrictions of the user. We analyze what information needs to be conveyed, how limited resources influence the presentation of this information, and argue, that by generating all different presentations in a common framework, a consistent appearance across devices can be achieved and that the different device classes can complement each other in facilitating the navigation task.

© All rights reserved Butz et al. and/or ACM Press

2000
 
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Baus, Jörg, Butz, Andreas and Krüger, Antonio (2000): Smart Graphics in Adaptive Way Descriptions. In: Advanced Visual Interfaces 2000 2000. pp. 92-97.

1998
 
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Butz, Andreas, Beshers, Clifford and Feiner, Steven K. (1998): Of Vampire Mirrors and Privacy Lamps: Privacy Management in Multi-User Augmented Environments. In: Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the 11th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 01 - 04, 1998, San Francisco, California, United States. pp. 171-172.

We consider the problem of privacy in a 3D multi-user collaborative environment. We assume that information objects are represented by visual icons, and can either be public or private, and that users need effective methods for viewing and manipulating that state. We suggest two methods, which we call vampire mirrors and privacy lamps, that are unobtrusive, simple, and natural.

© All rights reserved Butz et al. and/or ACM Press

1994
 
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Butz, Andreas (1994): BETTY: Planning and Generating Animations for the Visualization of Movements and Spatial Relations. In: Advanced Visual Interfaces 1994 1994. pp. 53-58.

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/andreas_butz.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1994-2012
Pub. count:48
Number of co-authors:88



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Antonio Kruger:8
Sebastian Boring:8
Antonio Krüger:7

 

 

Productive colleagues

Andreas Butz's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Saul Greenberg:140
Albrecht Schmidt:110
Steven K. Feiner:76
 
 
 
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