Publication statistics

Pub. period:1994-2009
Pub. count:32
Number of co-authors:55



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Paul M. Aoki:11
Margaret H. Szymanski:6
Michael Stonebraker:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Allison Woodruff's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gregory D. Abowd:116
James A. Landay:91
Stuart K. Card:75
 
 
 
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Allison Woodruff

Ph.D

Picture of Allison Woodruff.
Personal Homepage:
http://www.allisonwoodruff.com/

Current place of employment:
Intel Labs

Allison Woodruff is a human-computer interaction researcher who uses social science methods to study people and their relationships with technology, drawing on the results to rethink existing technologies and invent new technologies. She often studies extreme users who take unusual measures in their use of technology, in order to uncover problems with existing computing paradigms and to draw inspiration for the design of new technologies for the broader population. She has conducted qualitative studies in a wide range of settings, such as green homes, museums, amusement parks, religious environments, low-income neighborhoods, street sweeper maintenance yards, and traditional work environments. She has also partnered with quantitative researchers to develop and study novel web search and information visualization tools. To discover new technological opportunities, Allison draws on her interdisciplinary background in computer science, social science, and the humanities. She has 12 years of experience working for leading US corporate research laboratories. She is a co-inventor on 20 issued patents and has published extensively on topics such as mobile computing, sustainable technology, domestic technology, computer-mediated communication, and information visualization. Her work has been covered widely in the press, including the BBC and The Economist. Allison is passionate about using technology for social good, and she is an active advocate for research on sustainability. Her current project focuses on mobile environmental sensing and public policy (www.communitysensing.org). Woodruff holds a PhD in Computer Science from the University of California, Berkeley, an MS in Computer Science and an MA in Linguistics from the University of California, Davis, and a BA in English from California State University, Chico. While at the University of California, Berkeley, Woodruff was a member of the database research group led by Michael Stonebraker, and her dissertation focused on the generation of database visualizations that conform to the principle of constant information density. After graduating from the University of California, Berkeley, Woodruff worked as a research scientist at Xerox PARC from 1998-2004. In her spare time, she studies singing.

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Publications by Allison Woodruff (bibliography)

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2009
 
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Aoki, Paul M., Honicky, R. J., Mainwaring, Alan, Myers, Chris, Paulos, Eric, Subramanian, Sushmita and Woodruff, Allison (2009): A vehicle for research: using street sweepers to explore the landscape of environmental community action. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 375-384.

Researchers are developing mobile sensing platforms to facilitate public awareness of environmental conditions. However, turning such awareness into practical community action and political change requires more than just collecting and presenting data. To inform research on mobile environmental sensing, we conducted design fieldwork with government, private, and public interest stakeholders. In parallel, we built an environmental air quality sensing system and deployed it on street sweeping vehicles in a major U.S. city; this served as a research vehicle by grounding our interviews and affording us status as environmental action researchers. In this paper, we present a qualitative analysis of the landscape of environmental action, focusing on insights that will help researchers frame meaningful technological interventions.

© All rights reserved Aoki et al. and/or ACM Press

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 
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Aipperspach, Ryan, Hooker, Ben and Woodruff, Allison (2009): The heterogeneous home. In Interactions, 16 (1) pp. 35-38.

 
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Woodruff, Allison and Mankoff, Jennifer (2009): Environmental Sustainability. In IEEE Pervasive Computing, 8 (1) pp. 18-21.

2008
 
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Woodruff, Allison, Hasbrouck, Jay and Augustin, Sally (2008): A bright green perspective on sustainable choices. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 313-322.

We present a qualitative study of 35 United States households whose occupants have made significant accommodations to their homes and behaviors in order to be more environmentally responsible. Our goal is to inform the design of future sustainable technologies through an exploration of existing "green" lifestyles. We describe the motivations, practices, and experiences of the participants. The participants had diverse motivations ranging from caring for the Earth to frugal minimalism, and most participants also evidenced a desire to be unique. Most participants actively and consciously managed their homes and their daily practices to optimize their environmental responsibility. Their efforts to be environmentally responsible typically required significant dedication of time, attention, and other resources. As this level of commitment and desire to be unique may not generalize readily to the broader population, we discuss the importance of interactive technologies that influence surrounding infrastructure and circumstances in order to facilitate environmental responsibility.

© All rights reserved Woodruff et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Aipperspach, Ryan, Hooker, Ben and Woodruff, Allison (2008): The heterogeneous home. In: Youn, Hee Yong and Cho, We-Duke (eds.) UbiComp 2008 Ubiquitous Computing - 10th International Conference September 21-24, 2008, Seoul, Korea. pp. 222-231.

 
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Szymanski, Margaret, Aoki, Paul, Grinter, Rebecca E., Hurst, Amy, Thornton, James and Woodruff, Allison (2008): Sotto Voce: Facilitating Social Learning in a Historic House. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 17 (1) pp. 5-34.

This study examines visitors' use of two different electronic guidebook prototypes, the second an iteration of the first, that were developed to support social interaction between companions as they tour a historic house. Three studies were conducted in which paired visitors' social interactions were video- and audio-recorded for analysis. Using conversation analysis, the data from the use of prototype 1 and prototype 2 were compared. It was found that audio delivery methods were consequential to the ways in which visitors structurally organized their social activity. Further, the availability of structural opportunities for social interaction between visitors has implications for the ways in which the learning process occurs in museum settings.

© All rights reserved Szymanski et al. and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

2007
 
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Woodruff, Allison, Augustin, Sally and Foucault, Brooke (2007): Sabbath day home automation: "it's like mixing technology and religion". In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 527-536.

We present a qualitative study of 20 American Orthodox Jewish families' use of home automation for religious purposes. These lead users offer insight into real-life, long-term experience with home automation technologies. We discuss how automation was seen by participants to contribute to spiritual experience and how participants oriented to the use of automation as a religious custom. We also discuss the relationship of home automation to family life. We draw design implications for the broader population, including surrender of control as a design resource, home technologies that support long-term goals and lifestyle choices, and respite from technology.

© All rights reserved Woodruff et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Woodruff, Allison, Anderson, Ken, Mainwaring, Scott D. and Aipperspach, Ryan (2007): Portable, But Not Mobile: A Study of Wireless Laptops in the Home. In: LaMarca, Anthony, Langheinrich, Marc and Truong, Khai N. (eds.) PERVASIVE 2007 - Pervasive Computing 5th International Conference May 13-16, 2007, Toronto, Canada. pp. 216-233.

2006
 
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Aoki, Paul M., Szymanski, Margaret H., Plurkowski, Luke, Thornton, James D., Woodruff, Allison and Yi, Weilie (2006): Where's the "party" in "multi-party"?: analyzing the structure of small-group sociable talk. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW06 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2006. pp. 393-402.

Spontaneous multi-party interaction -- conversation among groups of three or more participants -- is part of daily life. While automated modeling of such interactions has received increased attention in ubiquitous computing research, there is little applied research on the organization of this highly dynamic and spontaneous sociable interaction within small groups. We report here on an applied conversation analytic study of small-group sociable talk, emphasizing structural and temporal aspects that can inform computational models. In particular, we examine the mechanics of multiple simultaneous conversational floors -- how participants initiate a new floor amidst an on-going floor, and how they subsequently show their affiliation with one floor over another. We also discuss the implications of these findings for the design of "smart" multi-party applications.

© All rights reserved Aoki et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Aipperspach, Ryan, Rattenbury, Tye, Woodruff, Allison and Canny, John F. (2006): A Quantitative Method for Revealing and Comparing Places in the Home. In: Dourish, Paul and Friday, Adrian (eds.) UbiComp 2006 Ubiquitous Computing - 8th International Conference September 17-21, 2006, Orange County, CA, USA. pp. 1-18.

2005
 
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Aoki, Paul M. and Woodruff, Allison (2005): Making space for stories: ambiguity in the design of personal communication systems. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 181-190.

Pervasive personal communication technologies offer the potential for important social benefits for individual users, but also the potential for significant social difficulties and costs. In research on face-to-face social interaction, ambiguity is often identified as an important resource for resolving social difficulties. In this paper, we discuss two design cases of personal communication systems, one based on fieldwork of a commercial system and another based on an unrealized design concept. The cases illustrate how user behavior concerning a particular social difficulty, unexplained unresponsiveness, can be influenced by technological issues that result in interactional ambiguity. The cases also highlight the need to balance the utility of ambiguity against the utility of usability and communicative clarity.

© All rights reserved Aoki and Woodruff and/or ACM Press

2004
 
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Woodruff, Allison and Aoki, Paul M. (2004): Push-to-Talk Social Talk. In Computer Supported Cooperative Work, 13 (5) pp. 409-441.

This paper presents an exploratory study of college-age students using two-way, push-to-talk cellular radios. We describe the observed and reported use of cellular radio by the participants. We discuss how the half-duplex, lightweight cellular radio communication was associated with reduced interactional commitment, which meant the cellular radios could be used for a wide range of conversation styles. One such style, intermittent conversation, is characterized by response delays. Intermittent conversation is surprising in an audio medium, since it is typically associated with textual media such as instant messaging. We present design implications of our findings.

© All rights reserved Woodruff and Aoki and/or Kluwer Academic Publishers

2003
 
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Aoki, Paul M., Romaine, Matthew, Szymanski, Margaret H., Thornton, James D., Wilson, Daniel and Woodruff, Allison (2003): The mad hatter's cocktail party: a social mobile audio space supporting multiple simultaneous conversations. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 425-432.

 
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Woodruff, Allison and Aoki, Paul M. (2003): How push-to-talk makes talk less pushy. In: Tremaine, Marilyn M. and Simone, Carla (eds.) Proceedings of the International ACM SIGGROUP Conference on Supporting Group Work 2003 November 9-12, 2003, Sanibel Island, Florida, USA. pp. 170-179.

This paper presents an exploratory study of college-age students using two-way, push-to-talk cellular radios. We describe the observed and reported use of cellular radio by the participants. We discuss how the half-duplex, lightweight cellular radio communication was associated with reduced interactional commitment, which meant the cellular radios could be used for a wide range of conversation styles. One such style, intermittent conversation, is characterized by response delays. Intermittent conversation is surprising in an audio medium, since it is typically associated with textual media such as instant messaging. We present design implications of our findings.

© All rights reserved Woodruff and Aoki and/or ACM Press

2002
 
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Suh, Bongwon, Woodruff, Allison, Rosenholtz, Ruth and Glass, Alyssa (2002): Popout prism: adding perceptual principles to overview+detail document interfaces. In: Terveen, Loren (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2002 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 20-25, 2002, Minneapolis, Minnesota. pp. 251-258.

 
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Aoki, Paul M., Grinter, Rebecca E., Hurst, Amy, Szymanski, Margaret H., Thornton, James D. and Woodruff, Allison (2002): Sotto voce: exploring the interplay of conversation and mobile audio spaces. In: Terveen, Loren (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2002 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 20-25, 2002, Minneapolis, Minnesota. pp. 431-438.

 
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Grinter, Rebecca E., Aoki, Paul M., Szymanski, Margaret H., Thornton, James D., Woodruff, Allison and Hurst, Amy (2002): Revisiting the visit: understanding how technology can shape the museum visit. In: Churchill, Elizabeth F., McCarthy, Joe, Neuwirth, Christine and Rodden, Tom (eds.) Proceedings of the 2002 ACM conference on Computer supported cooperative work November 16 - 20, 2002, New Orleans, Louisiana, USA. pp. 146-155.

This paper reports findings from a study of how a guidebook was used by pairs of visitors touring a historic house. We describe how the guidebook was incorporated into their visit in four ways: shared listening, independent use, following one another, and checking in on each other. We discuss how individual and groupware features were adopted in support of different visiting experiences, and illustrate how that adoption was influenced by social relationships, the nature of the current visit, and any museum visiting strategies that the couples had. Finally, we describe how the guidebook facilitated awareness between couples, and how awareness of non-guidebook users (strangers) influenced use.

© All rights reserved Grinter et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Woodruff, Allison, Szymanski, Margaret H., Grinter, Rebecca E. and Aoki, Paul M. (2002): Practical strategies for integrating a conversation analyst in an iterative design process. In: Proceedings of DIS02: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2002. pp. 255-264.

We present a case study of an iterative design process that includes a conversation analyst. We discuss potential benefits of conversation analysis for design, and we describe our strategies for integrating the conversation analyst in the design process. Since the analyst on our team had no previous exposure to design or engineering, and none of the other members of our team had any experience with conversation analysis, we needed to build a foundation for our interaction. One of our key strategies was to pair the conversation analyst with a designer in a highly interactive collaboration. Our tactics have been effective on our project, leading to valuable results that we believe we could not have obtained using another method. We hope that this paper can serve as a practical guide to those interested in establishing a productive and efficient working relationship between a conversation analyst and the other members of a design team.

© All rights reserved Woodruff et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Woodruff, Allison, Rosenholtz, Ruth, Morrison, Julie Bauer, Faulring, Andrew and Pirolli, Peter (2002): A comparison of the use of text summaries, plain thumbnails, and enhanced thumbnails for Web search tasks. In JASIST - Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 53 (2) pp. 172-185.

2001
 
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Woodruff, Allison, Faulring, Andrew, Rosenholtz, Ruth, Morrsion, Julie and Pirolli, Peter (2001): Using Thumbnails to Search the Web. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 198-205.

We introduce a technique for creating novel, textually-enhanced thumbnails of Web pages. These thumbnails combine the advantages of image thumbnails and text summaries to provide consistent performance on a variety of tasks. We conducted a study in which participants used three different types of summaries (enhanced thumbnails, plain thumbnails, and text summaries) to search Web pages to find several different types of information. Participants took an average of 67, 86, and 95 seconds to find the answer with enhanced thumbnails, plain thumbnails, and text summaries, respectively. We found a strong effect of question category. For some questions, text outperformed plain thumbnails, while for other questions, plain thumbnails outperformed text. Enhanced thumbnails (which combine the features of text summaries and plain thumbnails) were more consistent than either text summaries or plain thumbnails, having for all categories the best performance or performance that was statistically indistinguishable from the best.

© All rights reserved Woodruff et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Woodruff, Allison, Szymanski, Margaret H., Aoki, Paul M. and Hurst, Amy (2001): The Conversational Role of Electronic Guidebooks. In: Abowd, Gregory D., Brumitt, Barry and Shafer, Steven A. (eds.) Ubicomp 2001 Ubiquitous Computing - Third International Conference September 30 - October 2, 2001, Atlanta, Georgia, USA. pp. 187-208.

 
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Woodruff, Allison, Olston, Chris, Aiken, Alexander, Chu, Michael, Ercegovac, Vuk, Lin, Mark, Spalding, Mybrid and Stonebraker, Michael (2001): DataSplash: A Direct Manipulation Environment for Programming Semantic Zoom Visualizations of Tabular Data. In J. Vis. Lang. Comput., 12 (5) pp. 551-571.

2000
 
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Woodruff, Allison, Gossweiler, Rich, Pitkow, James, Chi, Ed H. and Card, Stuart K. (2000): Enhancing a Digital Book with a Reading Recommender. In: Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands. pp. 153-160.

Digital books can significantly enhance the reading experience, providing many functions not available in printed books. In this paper we study a particular augmentation of digital books that provides readers with customized recommendations. We systematically explore the application of spreading activation over text and citation data to generate useful recommendations. Our findings reveal that for the tasks performed in our corpus, spreading activation over text is more useful than citation data. Further, fusing text and citation data via spreading activation results in the most useful recommendations. The fused spreading activation techniques outperform traditional text-based retrieval methods. Finally, we introduce a preliminary user interface for the display of recommendations from these algorithms.

© All rights reserved Woodruff et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Aoki, Paul M. and Woodruff, Allison (2000): Improving Electronic Guidebook Interfaces Using a Task-Oriented Design Approach. In: Proceedings of DIS00: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2000. pp. 319-325.

Item selection is a key problem in electronic guidebook design. Many systems do not apply so-called context-awareness technologies to infer user interest, placing the entire burden of selection on the user. Conversely, to make selection easier, many systems automatically eliminate information that they infer is not of interest to the user. However, such systems often eliminate too much information, preventing the user from finding what they want. To realize the full potential of electronic guidebooks, designers must strike the right balance between automatic context-based inference and manual selection. In this paper, we introduce a task-oriented model of item selection for electronic guidebooks to help designers explore this continuum. We argue that item selection contains three sub-tasks and that these sub-tasks should be considered explicitly in system design. We apply our model to existing systems, demonstrating pitfalls of combining sub-tasks, and discuss how our model has improved the design of our own guidebook prototype.

© All rights reserved Aoki and Woodruff and/or ACM Press

 
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Baldonado, Michelle Q. Wang, Woodruff, Allison and Kuchinsky, Allan (2000): Guidelines for Using Multiple Views in Information Visualization. In: Advanced Visual Interfaces 2000 2000. pp. 110-119.

 
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Olston, Chris and Woodruff, Allison (2000): Getting Portals to Behave. In: InfoVis 2000 2000. pp. 15-26.

1998
 
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Woodruff, Allison, Landay, James A. and Stonebraker, Michael (1998): Constant Density Visualizations of Non-Uniform Distributions of Data. In: Mynatt, Elizabeth D. and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the 11th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 01 - 04, 1998, San Francisco, California, United States. pp. 19-28.

The cartographic Principle of Constant Information Density suggests that the amount of information in an interactive visualization should remain constant as the user pans and zooms. In previous work, we presented a system, VIDA (Visual Information Density Adjuster), which helps users manually construct applications in which overall display density remains constant. In the context of semantic zoom systems, this approach ensures uniformity in the z dimension, but does not extend naturally to ensuring uniformity in the x and y dimensions. In this paper, we present a new approach that automatically creates displays that are uniform in the x, y, and z dimensions. In the new system, users express constraints about visual representations that should appear in the display. The system applies these constraints to subdivisions of the display such that each subdivision meets a target density value. We have implemented our technique in the DataSplash/VIDA database visualization environment. We describe our algorithm, implementation, and the advantages and disadvantages of our approach.

© All rights reserved Woodruff et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Woodruff, Allison, Landay, James A. and Stonebraker, Michael (1998): Constant information density in zoomable interfaces. In: Catarci, Tiziana, Costabile, Maria Francesca, Santucci, Giuseppe and Tarantino, Laura (eds.) AVI 1998 - Proceedings of the working conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces May 24 - 27, 1998, LAquila, Italy. pp. 57-65.

1997
 
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Woodruff, Allison, Dey, Anind K. and Abowd, Gregory D. (1997): CyberDesk: Automated Integration of Desktop and Network Services. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 552-553.

The CyberDesk project suggests a way to break the prevailing assumption in personal computing that the user must search out ways to integrate behavior between separate services. We present a technique and prototype system for automatic integration of desktop applications and network services that requires no effort by either the designer or the end-user.

© All rights reserved Woodruff et al. and/or ACM Press

1995
 
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Woodruff, Allison and Stonebraker, Michael (1995): Buffering of Intermediate Results in Dataflow Diagrams. In: VL 1995 1995. pp. 187-.

1994
 
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Woodruff, Allison and Plaunt, Christian (1994): GIPSY: Automated Geographic Indexing of Text Documents. In JASIST - Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 45 (9) pp. 645-655.

 
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Woodruff, Allison, Wisnovsky, Peter, Taylor, Cimarron, Stonebraker, Michael, Paxson, Caroline, Chen, Jolly and Aiken, Alexander (1994): Zooming and Tunneling in Tioga: Supporting Navigation in Multimedia Space. In: VL 1994 1994. pp. 191-193.

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/allison_woodruff.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1994-2009
Pub. count:32
Number of co-authors:55



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Paul M. Aoki:11
Margaret H. Szymanski:6
Michael Stonebraker:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

Allison Woodruff's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gregory D. Abowd:116
James A. Landay:91
Stuart K. Card:75
 
 
 
Jul 31

Design is the art of gradually applying constraints until only one solution remains.

-- Unknown

 
 

Featured chapter

Marc Hassenzahl explains the fascinating concept of User Experience and Experience Design. Commentaries by Don Norman, Eric Reiss, Mark Blythe, and Whitney Hess

User Experience and Experience Design !

 
 

Our Latest Books

Kumar and Herger 2013: Gamification at Work: Designing Engaging Business Software...
by Janaki Mythily Kumar and Mario Herger

 
Start reading

Whitworth and Ahmad 2013: The Social Design of Technical Systems: Building technologies for communities...
by Brian Whitworth and Adnan Ahmad

 
Start reading

Soegaard and Dam 2013: The Encyclopedia of Human-Computer Interaction, 2nd Ed....
by Mads Soegaard and Rikke Friis Dam

 
Start reading
 
 

Help us help you!