Publication statistics

Pub. period:1988-2012
Pub. count:81
Number of co-authors:133



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Benjamin B. Bederson:17
Mona Leigh Guha:16
Evan Golub:8

 

 

Productive colleagues

Allison Druin's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Steve Benford:121
Yvonne Rogers:99
Panos Markopoulos:81
 
 
 

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Allison Druin

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Publications by Allison Druin (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Rotman, Dana, Preece, Jennifer, He, Yurong and Druin, Allison (2012): Extreme ethnography: challenges for research in large scale online environments. In: Proceedings of the 2012 iConference 2012. pp. 207-214. Available online

Large scale online environments, such as social networks, present an emerging phenomenon where millions of people come together online to share and consume information and socialize. In the past, ethnography was used extensively to provide a nuanced understanding of the relationship between technology and humans. The ways of "doing ethnography" have gone through several changes in order to fit the spatial and temporal nature of online research. While these instantiations of ethnography are important, the scale and constant change of these environments pose considerable challenges for ethnographic research: users come and go, and so do applications and content. The contribution of this paper is in articulating the methodological challenges stemming from the characteristics of large scale online environments, and in calling for rethinking of the strategies and methods for effective ethnography in these environments.

© All rights reserved Rotman et al. and/or their publisher

2011
 
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Walsh, Greg, Druin, Allison, Guha, Mona Leigh, Foss, Elizabeth, Golub, Evan, Hatley, Leshell, Bonsignore, Elizabeth and Franckel, Sonia (2011): Layered elaboration. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. p. 489. Available online

In this video we describe Layered Elaboration techniques and their use in the cooperative inquiry method.

© All rights reserved Walsh et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Walsh, Greg, Druin, Allison, Foss, Elizabeth, Golub, Evan, Guha, Mona Leigh, Hatley, Leshell and Bonsignore, Elizabeth (2011): Energy house. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. p. 513. Available online

In this video we describe Energy House. Energy House is a game designed with the Cooperative Inquiry Method through the Layered Elaboration technique. Children power items in a virtual house by jumping up and down.

© All rights reserved Walsh et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Read, Janet C., Hourcade, Juan Pablo, Markopoulos, Panos and Druin, Allison (2011): Child computer interaction invited SIG: IDC remixed, CCI remapped. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 689-691. Available online

Over the past fifteen years, the discipline of Child Computer Interaction has been steadily growing. As the community matures and as methods and processes are refined, and become situated, there is an urgent need to start to develop a theory around CCI that can be used with some confidence by the research community. The CCI Community SIG at CHI is supporting this process by looking at the influences on the community. In a lively debate that will include presentations and discussion, this SIG will bring the community together in a discussion that will impact on the way the community proceeds.

© All rights reserved Read et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Druin, Allison, Knell, Gary, Soloway, Elliot, Russell, Daniel, Mynatt, Elizabeth and Rogers, Yvonne (2011): The future of child-computer interaction. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 693-696. Available online

In this panel, academic, non-profit, and industry professionals will ask, what does the future hold for "child-computer interaction?" Panelists will explore such issues as how new mobile, social, and ubiquitous technologies change children's future patterns of searching, exploration, and expression of information; how learning environments will be ever-changing because of new technologies; and the challenges and opportunities of designing for child-computer interaction.

© All rights reserved Druin et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Chipman, Gene, Fails, Jerry Alan, Druin, Allison and Guha, Mona Leigh (2011): Paper vs. tablet computers: a comparative study using Tangible Flags. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC11 Interaction Design and Children 2011. pp. 29-36. Available online

Concurrent collaboration is a critical skill for cognitive and social development. Tangible Flags is a system designed to facilitate collaboration and exploration, and bridge the gap between the physical and the digital. The system enables children to tag an item of interest in the real world with a flag, scan the flag, and create a corresponding digital artifact on a tablet computer. Another child can see the flag and its context, scan it, and view and modify the digital artifact in a form of collaboration. This paper describes a study that compares two Tangible Flag systems; a paper system and a tablet computer system. The study identifies several collaborative advantages of using the technology-based system, including increased awareness, more shared experiences, and longer time participating in activities.

© All rights reserved Chipman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Walsh, Greg, Brown, Quincy and Druin, Allison (2011): Social networking as a vehicle to foster cross-cultural awareness. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC11 Interaction Design and Children 2011. pp. 209-212. Available online

The growth of online social networks such as Facebook, MySpace, and Linked-In has transformed the way in which individuals establish and maintain relationships for both business and entertainment. In this paper we present the analysis of a similar online social network that was used to foster cross-cultural awareness among users ages 14-17. The social network provided students across the globe with an environment to establish online identities, explore their own culture and the culture of peers who were located in three different countries. We make recommendations to network designers to reconsider friendship metaphors, work within existing network tools, and replace text as the default medium in communication.

© All rights reserved Walsh et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Fails, Jerry Alan, Druin, Allison and Guha, Mona Leigh (2011): Content splitting & space sharing: collaboratively reading & sharing children's stories on mobile devices. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 361-370. Available online

This paper addresses how children can collaborate by leveraging the ubiquity of mobile devices. Specifically we investigate how children (ages 8-9) read and share children's stories using two collaborative configurations: content splitting and space sharing. Content splitting is where interface pieces (e.g. words, pictures) are split between two or more devices. Space sharing is where the same content (e.g. a document) is spread or shared across devices. The results point to an overall preference for the content splitting configuration. Supporting collaborative configurations on mobile devices can help overcome one of the most significant usability issues these devices face -- their limited screen space.

© All rights reserved Fails et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Brown, Quincy, Bonsignore, Elizabeth, Hatley, Leshell, Druin, Allison, Walsh, Gregory, Foss, Elizabeth, Brewer, Robin, Hammer, Joseph and Golub, Evan (2010): Clear Panels: a technique to design mobile application interactivity. In: Proceedings of DIS10 Designing Interactive Systems 2010. pp. 360-363. Available online

We introduce a design technique, Clear Panels, to design interactive mobile device applications. Using mixed-fidelity prototyping, a combination of low- and high-tech materials, participants refine multiple aspects of a mobile application's design. Clear Panels supports writing and sketching via a transparent overlay affixed atop a mobile device screen. It enables design partners to refine their gesture-based interactions on actual devices. The technique has been successfully implemented in the design of children's mobile applications. The technique leverages and extends longstanding interaction design methods to include mobile and hand-held technologies. Importantly, we show it is effective in raising participants' awareness of key mobile application design issues without constraining their creativity.

© All rights reserved Brown et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Druin, Allison, Foss, Elizabeth, Hutchinson, Hilary, Golub, Evan and Hatley, Leshell (2010): Children's roles using keyword search interfaces at home. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 413-422. Available online

Children want to find information about their world, but there are barriers to finding what they seek. Young people have varying abilities to formulate multi-step queries and comprehend search results. Challenges in understanding where to type, confusion about what tools are available, and frustration with how to parse the results page all have led to a lack of perceived search success for children 7-11 years old. In this paper, we describe seven search roles children display as information seekers using Internet keyword interfaces, based on a home study of 83 children ages 7, 9, and 11. These roles are defined not only by the children's search actions, but also by who influences their searching, their perceived success, and trends in age and gender. These roles suggest a need for new interfaces that expand the notion of keywords, scaffold results, and develop a search culture among children.

© All rights reserved Druin et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Walsh, Greg, Druin, Allison, Guha, Mona Leigh, Foss, Elizabeth, Golub, Evan, Hatley, Leshell, Bonsignore, Elizabeth and Franckel, Sonia (2010): Layered elaboration: a new technique for co-design with children. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1237-1240. Available online

As technology for children becomes more mobile, social, and distributed, our design methods and techniques must evolve to better explore these new directions. This paper reports on "Layered Elaboration," a co-design technique created to support these evolving needs. Layered Elaboration allows design teams to generate ideas through an iterative process in which each version leaves prior ideas intact while extending concepts. Layered Elaboration is a useful technique as it enables co-design to take place asynchronously and does not require much space or many resources. Our intergenerational team, including adults and children ages 7-11 years old, used the technique to design both a game about history and a prototype of an instructional game about energy conservation.

© All rights reserved Walsh et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Tarkan, Sureyya, Sazawal, Vibha, Druin, Allison, Golub, Evan, Bonsignore, Elizabeth M., Walsh, Greg and Atrash, Zeina (2010): Toque: designing a cooking-based programming language for and with children. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 2417-2426. Available online

An intergenerational design team of children (ages 7-11 years old) along with graduate students and faculty in computer science and information studies developed a programming language for children, Toque. Concrete real-world cooking scenarios were used as programming metaphors to support an accessible programming learning experience. The Wiimote and Nunchuk were used as physical programming input devices. The programs that were created were pictorial recipes which dynamically controlled animations of an on-screen chef preparing virtual dishes in a graphical kitchen environment. Through multiple design sessions, programming strategies were explored, cooking metaphors were developed and, prototypes of the Toque environment were iterated. Results of these design experiences have shown us the importance of pair-programming, programming by storytelling, parallel programming, function-argument relationships, and the role of tangibility in overcoming challenges with constraints imposed by the system design.

© All rights reserved Tarkan et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Fails, Jerry Alan, Druin, Allison and Guha, Mona Leigh (2010): Mobile collaboration: collaboratively reading and creating children's stories on mobile devices. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC10 Interaction Design and Children 2010. pp. 20-29. Available online

This paper discusses design iterations of Mobile Stories -- a mobile technology that empowers children to collaboratively read and create stories. We present the design and discuss the impact of different collocated collaborative configurations for mobile devices including: content splitting and space sharing. We share design experiences that illustrate how Mobile Stories supports collaboration and mobility, and identify how the collocated collaborative configurations are best suited for reading and sharing tasks. We also identify how creative tasks foster more mobility and dynamic interactions between collaborators.

© All rights reserved Fails et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Guha, Mona Leigh, Druin, Allison and Fails, Jerry Alan (2010): Investigating the impact of design processes on children. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC10 Interaction Design and Children 2010. pp. 198-201. Available online

While there is a wealth of information about children's technology and the design processes used to create it, there is a dearth of information regarding how the children who participate in these design processes may be affected by their participation. In this paper, we motivate why studying this impact is important and look at the foundation provided by past research that touches on this topic. We conclude by briefly proposing methods appropriate for studying the impact of the design process on the children involved.

© All rights reserved Guha et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Read, Janet C., Markopoulos, Panos and Druin, Allison (2010): Guest editorial Preface Children and their interactions with Mobile technology. In International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, 2 (2) pp. i-iii. Available online

 
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Franckel, Sonia, Bonsignore, Elizabeth and Druin, Allison (2010): Designing for Children's Mobile Storytelling. In International Journal of Mobile Human Computer Interaction, 2 (2) pp. 19-36. Available online

Mobile technologies offer novel opportunities for children to express themselves in-context, seamlessly, without disrupting the flow of their formal learning activities or informal play. Most contemporary mobile devices are equipped with multimedia support that can be used to create multimodal stories that represent the rich life narratives children experience, imagine, and want to share. The authors investigated these issues over a 9-month series of participatory design sessions in the Human-Computer Interaction Lab (HCIL) at the University of Maryland. In this article, the authors describe their work with children in designing mobile tools for story creation and collaboration. Throughout this work, they asked the following questions: What stories do children want to tell, and how do they want to convey them in a mobile context? The findings suggest the need for mobile technology-based applications that support children's unique storytelling habits, particularly interruptability and multimodality.

© All rights reserved Franckel et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Druin, Allison, Cavallo, David, Fabian, Christopher, Bederson, Benjamin B., Revelle, Glenda, Rogers, Yvonne and Gray, Jim (2009): Mobile technologies for the world's children. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3297-3300. Available online

In this panel, academic, non-profit, and industry professionals will discuss their global perspectives on mobile technologies for the world's children. Panelists will explore such issues concerning children's access to mobile devices, the decreasing age that children have access to these technologies, mobile innovations for learning, and challenges/opportunities in diverse countries. This interactive session will begin with each panelist giving a short summary of their work-to-date with children and various mobile applications. Then the panelists will be asked questions by children from different countries via pre-recorded video. Audience members will be invited to offer their thoughts and comments as well as the panelists during the video question period. Audience members will also be able to ask further questions throughout the panel discussion.

© All rights reserved Druin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Fails, Jerry Alan, Druin, Allison and Guha, Mona Leigh (2009): Collocated mobile collaboration. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 3495-3496. Available online

Mobile devices have changed, and continue to shape, the world in which we live. When these devices were first introduced they were most often used in isolation to schedule appointments, take notes, play games, or view or edit pictures and stories. The extent of the collaboration on these mobile devices was to make phone calls, which has led to their worldwide distribution. Despite their broad proliferation, there are limitations such as small screen size and limited interaction space. We believe that by bringing devices and people together, these limitations can be overcome. In this video submission, we illustrate the potential of devices and people working together by showing how children can collaboratively read and create stories using mobile devices and exploit the shoulder-to-shoulder collaborative situation to share and expand the interactive space.

© All rights reserved Fails et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison, Foss, Elizabeth, Hatley, Leshell, Golub, Evan, Guha, Mona Leigh, Fails, Jerry and Hutchinson, Hilary (2009): How children search the internet with keyword interfaces. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC09 Interaction Design and Children 2009. pp. 89-96. Available online

Children are among the most frequent users of the Internet, yet searching and browsing the web can present many challenges. Studies over the past two decades on how children search were conducted with finite and pre-determined content found in CD-ROM applications, online digital libraries, and web directories. However, with the current popularity of the open Internet and keyword-based interfaces for searching it, more critical analysis of the challenges children face today is needed. This paper presents the findings of our initial study to understand how children ages 7, 9, and 11 search the Internet using keyword interfaces in the home. Our research has revealed that although today's children have been exposed to computers for most of their lives, spelling, typing, query formulation, and deciphering results are all still potential barriers to finding the information they need.

© All rights reserved Druin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison, Bederson, Benjamin B. and Quinn, Alex (2009): Designing intergenerational mobile storytelling. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC09 Interaction Design and Children 2009. pp. 325-328. Available online

Informal educational experiences with grandparents and other older adults can be an important component of children's education, especially in circumstances where high quality educational services and facilities are not readily available. Mobile devices offer unique capabilities to support such interactions. We report on an ongoing participatory design project with an intergenerational design group to create mobile applications for reading and editing books, or even creating all new stories on an Apple iPhone.

© All rights reserved Druin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Bederson, Benjamin B., Quinn, Alex and Druin, Allison (2009): Designing the reading experience for scanned multi-lingual picture books on mobile phones. In: JCDL09 Proceedings of the 2009 Joint International Conference on Digital Libraries 2009. pp. 305-308. Available online

This paper reports on an adaption of the existing PopoutText and ClearText display techniques to mobile phones. It explains the design rationale for a freely available iPhone application to read books from the International Children's Digital Library. Through a combination of applied image processing, a zoomable user interface, and a process of working with children to develop the detailed design, we present an interface that supports clear reading of scanned picture books in multiple languages on a mobile phone.

© All rights reserved Bederson et al. and/or their publisher

2008
 
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Guha, Mona Leigh, Druin, Allison and Fails, Jerry Alan (2008): Designing with and for children with special needs: an inclusionary model. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC08 Interaction Design and Children 2008. pp. 61-64. Available online

In order to design for children with special needs, we need to design with children with special needs. The inclusionary model proposed in this paper suggests that appropriate involvement of children with special needs in the design process begins with the level of involvement a team expects from children, and is additionally influenced by the nature and severity of the child's disability and the availability and intensity of support available to the child.

© All rights reserved Guha et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison (2008): My father's kitchen table. In Interactions, 15 (1) pp. 67-68. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison (2008): Designing online interactions: what kids want and what designers know. In Interactions, 15 (3) pp. 42-44. Available online

2007
 
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Druin, Allison, Weeks, Ann, Massey, Sheri and Bederson, Benjamin B. (2007): Children's interests and concerns when using the international children's digital library: a four-country case study. In: JCDL07: Proceedings of the 7th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2007. pp. 167-176. Available online

This paper presents a case study of 12 children who used the International Children's Digital Library (ICDL) over four years and live in one of four countries: Germany, Honduras, New Zealand, and the United States. By conducting interviews, along with collecting drawings and book reviews, this study describes these children's interests in books, libraries, technology and the world around them. Findings from this study include: these young people increased the variety of books they read online; still valued their physical libraries as spaces for social interaction and reading; showed increased reading motivation; and showed interest in exploring different cultures.

© All rights reserved Druin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Komlodi, Anita, Hou, Weimin, Preece, Jennifer J., Druin, Allison, Golub, Evan, Alburo, Jade, Liao, Sabrina, Elkiss, Aaron and Resnik, Philip (2007): Evaluating a cross-cultural children's online book community: Lessons learned for sociability, usability, and cultural exchange. In Interacting with Computers, 19 (4) pp. 494-511. Available online

The use of computers for human-to-human communication among adults has been studied for many years, but using computer technology to enable children from all over the world to talk to each other has rarely been discussed by researchers. The goal of our research is to fill this gap and explore the design and evaluation of children's cross-language online communities via a case study of the International Children's Digital Library Communities (ICDLCommunities). This project supports the development of communities for children (ages 7-11) that form around the International Digital Children's Library (ICDL) book collection. In this community the children can learn about each others' cultures and make friends even if they do not speak the same language. They can also read and create stories and ask and answer questions about these. From this evaluation study we learned that: (i) children are very interested in their counterparts in other countries and a remarkable amount of communication takes place even when they do not share a common language; (ii) representing their identity online in many different forms is particularly important to children when communicating in an online community; (iii) children enjoy drawing but representing stories in a sequence of diagrams is challenging and needs support; and (iv) asking and answering questions without language is possible using graphical templates. In this paper we present our findings and make recommendations for designing children's cross-cultural online communities.

© All rights reserved Komlodi et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Hutchinson, Hilary Browne, Druin, Allison and Bederson, Benjamin B. (2007): Supporting elementary-age children's searching and browsing: Design and evaluation using the international children's digital library. In JASIST - Journal of the American Society for Information Science and Technology, 58 (11) pp. 1618-1630. Available online

2006
 
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Chipman, Gene, Druin, Allison, Beer, Dianne, Fails, Jerry, Guha, Mona Leigh and Simms, Sante (2006): A case study of tangible flags: a collaborative technology to enhance field trips. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC06: Interaction Design and Children 2006. pp. 1-8. Available online

This paper describes research that investigates the use of a technology designed to support young children's collaborative artifact creation in outdoor environments. Collaboration while creating knowledge artifacts is an important part of children's learning, yet it can be limited while exploring outdoors. The construction of a joint representation often occurs in the classroom after the experience, where further investigation and observation of the environment is not possible. This paper describes a research study where collaborative technology was developed, used by children, and evaluated in an authentic setting -- a U.S. National Park.

© All rights reserved Chipman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hutchinson, Hilary Browne, Bederson, Benjamin B. and Druin, Allison (2006): The evolution of the international children's digital library searching and browsing interface. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC06: Interaction Design and Children 2006. pp. 105-112. Available online

Elementary-age children (ages 6-11) are among the largest user groups of computers and the Internet, so it is important to design searching and browsing tools to support them. However, many such tools do not consider their skills and preferences. In this paper, we present the design rationale and process for creating the searching and browsing tool for the International Children's Digital Library (ICDL), the results from a user study evaluating it, and the challenges and possibilities it presents for other children's interfaces.

© All rights reserved Hutchinson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Plaisant, Catherine, Clamage, Aaron, Hutchinson, Hilary Browne, Bederson, Benjamin B. and Druin, Allison (2006): Shared family calendars: Promoting symmetry and accessibility. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 13 (3) pp. 313-346. Available online

We describe the design and use of a system facilitating the sharing of calendar information between remotely located, multi-generational family members. Most previous work in this area involves software enabling younger family members to monitor their parents. We have found, however, that older adults are equally if not more interested in the activities of younger family members. The major obstacle preventing them from participating in information sharing is the technology itself. Therefore, we developed a multi-layered interface approach that offers simple interaction to older users. In our system, users can choose to enter information into a computerized calendar or write it by hand on digital paper calendars. All of the information is automatically shared among everyone in the distributed family. By making the interface more accessible to older users, we promote symmetrical sharing of information among both older and younger family members. We present our participatory design process, describe the user interface, and report on an exploratory field study in three households of an extended family.

© All rights reserved Plaisant et al. and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Fails, Jerry, Druin, Allison, Guha, Mona Leigh, Chipman, Gene, Simms, Sante and Churaman, Wayne (2005): Child's play: a comparison of desktop and physical interactive environments. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC05: Interaction Design and Children 2005. pp. 48-55. Available online

The importance of play in young children's lives cannot be minimized. From teddy bears to blocks, children's experiences with the tools of play can impact their social, emotional, physical, and cognitive development. Today, the tools of play include desktop computers and computer-enhanced physical environments. In this paper, we consider the merits of desktop and physical environments for young children (4-6 years old), by comparing the same content-infused game in both contexts. Both quantitative and qualitative methods are used for data collection and analysis.

© All rights reserved Fails et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Scarlatos, Lori L., Bruckman, Amy S., Druin, Allison, Eisenberg, Michael, Lenore, Molly and Zuckerman, Oren (2005): Connecting with kids: so what's new?. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1172-1173. Available online

From pre-schools to high schools, at home and in museums, the educational community has embraced the use of computers as a teaching tool. Yet many institutions will simply install "what everyone else is using" without questioning how technology can be best used to enhance education. For this panel, we have assembled a broad range of researchers and practitioners who are on the forefront of using computers to teach kids in novel ways. Each panelist will summarize their approach with examples of projects that they believe will demonstrate "what's new". We will then have videotaped children pose their toughest educational challenges to the panelists. Panelists will answer by talking about how they would meet these challenges. Finally, attendees will get to vote for their favorite solution. This will expose the CHI audience to a range of educational challenges, with a taste of the different ways that these problems can be solved.

© All rights reserved Scarlatos et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Revelle, Glenda, Zuckerman, Oren, Druin, Allison and Bolas, Mark (2005): Tangible user interfaces for children. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 2051-2052. Available online

Tangible user interfaces, which provide interactivity using real physical objects, hold enormous promise for children. Exploring and manipulating physical objects is a key component of young children's learning. The educational power of digital technology for children has typically been limited by the fact that users explore and manipulate abstract two-dimensional screen-based representations, and not real physical objects. Embedding interactivity into physical objects, therefore, allows the "best of both worlds" - supporting traditional exploratory play with physical objects that can be extended and enhanced by the interactive power of digital technology. Participants in this SIG are invited to share ideas regarding the design and development of tangible interfaces, and to bring demos or slides/videos showing work in this area. Participants will review as many examples as time allows, and discuss the issues surrounding design and development of such interfaces. A primary goal of this SIG is to foster the development of a community of researchers and practitioners who are focused on designing and developing tangible interfaces for children.

© All rights reserved Revelle et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison and Hourcade, Juan Pablo (2005): Introduction. In Communications of the ACM, 48 (1) pp. 32-34. Available online

 
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Guha, Mona Leigh, Druin, Allison, Chipman, Gene, Fails, Jerry Alan, Simms, Sante and Farber, Allison (2005): Working with young children as technology design partners. In Communications of the ACM, 48 (1) pp. 39-42. Available online

2004
 
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Guha, Mona Leigh, Druin, Allison, Chipman, Gene, Fails, Jerry, Simms, Sante and Farber, Allison (2004): Mixing ideas: a new technique for working with young children as design partners. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC04: Interaction Design and Children 2004. pp. 35-42. Available online

This paper sets forth a new technique for working with young children as design partners. Mixing ideas is presented as an additional Cooperative Inquiry design technique used to foster effective collaboration with young children (ages 4-6). The method emerged from our work with children on the Classroom of the Future project at the University of Maryland. A case study of this work is presented along with the implications of this method for future research.

© All rights reserved Guha et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Hourcade, Juan Pablo, Bederson, Benjamin B., Druin, Allison and Guimbretiere, Francois (2004): Differences in pointing task performance between preschool children and adults using mice. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 11 (4) pp. 357-386. Available online

Several experiments by psychologists and human factors researchers have shown that when young children execute pointing tasks, they perform at levels below older children and adults. However, these experiments have not provided user interface designers with an understanding of the severity or the nature of the difficulties young children have when using input devices. To address this need, we conducted a study to gain a better understanding of 4 and 5 year-old children's use of mice. We compared the performance of thirteen 4 year-olds, thirteen 5 year-olds and thirteen young adults in point-and-click tasks. Plots of the paths taken by the participants show severe differences between adults' and preschool children's ability to control the mouse. We were not surprised then to find age had a significant effect on accuracy, target reentry, and efficiency. We also found that target size had a significant effect on accuracy and target reentry. Measuring movement time at four different times (first entering target, last entering target, pressing button, releasing button) yielded the result that Fitts' law models children well only up to the time they first enter the target. Overall, we found that the difference between the performance of children and adults was large enough to warrant user interface interactions designed specifically for preschool children. The results additionally suggest that children need the most help once they get close to targets.

© All rights reserved Hourcade et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Montemayor, Jaime, Druin, Allison, Chipman, Gene, Farber, Allison and Guha, Mona Leigh (2004): Tools for children to create physical interactive storyrooms. In Computers in Entertainment, 2 (1) p. 12. Available online

2003
 
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Hutchinson, Hilary, Mackay, Wendy E., Westerlund, Bosse, Bederson, Benjamin B., Druin, Allison, Plaisant, Catherine, Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel, Conversy, Stephane and Eiderback, Bjorn (2003): Technology probes: inspiring design for and with families. In: Cockton, Gilbert and Korhonen, Panu (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2003 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 5-10, 2003, Ft. Lauderdale, Florida, USA. pp. 17-24.

 
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Hourcade, Juan Pablo, Bederson, Benjamin B., Druin, Allison, Rose, Anne, Farber, Allison and Takayama, Yoshifumi (2003): The International Children's Digital Library: viewing digital books online. In Interacting with Computers, 15 (2) pp. 151-167.

Abstract Reading books plays an important role in children's cognitive and social development. However, many children do not have access to diverse collections of books due to the limited resources of their community libraries. We have begun to address this issue by creating a large-scale digital archive of children's books, the International Children's Digital Library (ICDL). In this paper we discuss our initial efforts in building the ICDL, concentrating on the design of innovative digital book readers.

© All rights reserved Hourcade et al. and/or Elsevier Science

 
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Knudtzon, Kendra, Druin, Allison, Kaplan, Nancy, Summers, Kathryn, Chisik, Yoram, Kulkarni, Rahul, Moulthrop, Stuart, Weeks, Holly and Bederson, Benjamin B. (2003): Starting an intergenerational technology design team: a case study. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC03: Interaction Design and Children 2003. pp. 51-58. Available online

This paper presents a case study of the first three months of a new intergenerational design team with children ages 10-13. It discusses the research and design methods used for working with children of this age group, the challenges and opportunities of starting a new team, and the lessons learned.

© All rights reserved Knudtzon et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Gilutz, Shuli, Bekker, Tilde, Druin, Allison, Fisch, Shalom and Read, Janet (2003): Children's online interfaces: is usability testing worthwhile?. In: Proceedings of ACM IDC03: Interaction Design and Children 2003. pp. 143-145. Available online

'Designing for usability' refers to the activity of incorporating research about how people use interactive interfaces into the design process. In our specific case, it refers to designers of children's products taking into consideration how the children use different software that they encounter. Many organizations that develop new interactive environments for children do not incorporate usability studies, or they do so without a good understanding of the complexity and consequences of these issues. The end results are websites and programs that children cannot use - and therefore will not use. In some cases many of the educational benefits and creative ideas developed are never utilized, because children do not pass the interface hurdle. The participating panel members have unique views about the role and value of usability studies on the design process. With an emphasis on the design of online environments, they will discuss their personal experiences of designing for usability, and will offer their understanding of the significance of usability in the design of interactive environments for kids.

© All rights reserved Gilutz et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison, Bederson, Benjamin B., Weeks, Ann, Farber, Allison, Grosjean, Jesse, Guha, Mona Leigh, Hourcade, Juan Pablo, Lee, Juhyun, Liao, Sabrina, Reuter, Kara, Rose, Anne, Takayama, Yoshifumi and Zhang, Lingling (2003): The International Children's Digital Library: Description and analysis of first use. In First Monday, 8 (5) . Available online

 
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Druin, Allison, Revelle, Glenda, Bederson, Benjamin B., Hourcade, Juan Pablo, Farber, Allison, Lee, Juhyun and Campbell, Dana (2003): A collaborative digital library for children. In J. Comp. Assisted Learning, 19 (2) pp. 239-248. Available online

2002
 
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Montemayor, Jaime, Druin, Allison, Farber, Allison, Simms, Sante, Churaman, Wayne and D'Amour, Allison (2002): Physical programming: designing tools for children to create physical interactive environments. In: Terveen, Loren (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2002 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 20-25, 2002, Minneapolis, Minnesota. pp. 299-306.

 
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Druin, Allison (2002): The role of children in the design of new technology. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 21 (1) pp. 1-25.

This paper suggests a framework for understanding the roles that children can play in the technology design process, particularly in regards to designing technologies that support learning. Each role, user, tester, informant and design partner has been defined based upon a review of the literature and the author's own laboratory research experiences. This discussion does not suggest that any one role is appropriate for all research or development needs. Instead, by understanding this framework the reader may be able to make more informed decisions about the design processes they choose to use with children in creating new technologies. This paper will present for each role a historical overview, research and development methods, as well as the strengths, challenges and unique contributions associated with children in the design process.

© All rights reserved Druin and/or Taylor and Francis

2001
 
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Taxen, Gustav, Druin, Allison, Fast, Carina and Kjellin, Marita (2001): KidStory: a technology design partnership with children. In Behaviour and Information Technology, 20 (2) pp. 119-125.

We present a new design method that is used within the KidStory project to enable a large number of young children to participate as partners in the design of advanced storytelling technology. The method is an adaptation of the cooperative inquiry method for school environments and uses a combination of evaluation, brainstorming and traditional education methods. These activities have lead to the elaboration of new ideas, impacted the design of existing software and produced a number of interesting new technology designs.

© All rights reserved Taxen et al. and/or Taylor and Francis

 
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Druin, Allison and Inkpen, Kori (2001): When are Personal Technologies for Children?. In Personal and Ubiquitous Computing, 5 (3) pp. 191-194. Available online

2000
 
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Benford, Steve, Bederson, Benjamin B., Akesson, Karl-Petter, Bayon, Victor, Druin, Allison, Hansson, Par, Hourcade, Juan Pablo, Ingram, Rob and Neale, Helen (2000): Designing Storytelling Technologies to Encouraging Collaboration between Young Children. In: Turner, Thea, Szwillus, Gerd, Czerwinski, Mary, Peterno, Fabio and Pemberton, Steven (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2000 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 1-6, 2000, The Hague, The Netherlands. pp. 556-563. Available online

We describe the iterative design of two collaborative storytelling technologies for young children, KidPad and the Klump. We focus on the idea of designing interfaces to subtly encourage collaboration so that children are invited to discover the added benefits of working together. This idea has been motivated by our experiences of using early versions of our technologies in schools in Sweden and the UK. We compare the approach of encouraging collaboration with other approaches to synchronizing shared interfaces. We describe how we have revised the technologies to encourage collaboration and to reflect design suggestions made by the children themselves.

© All rights reserved Benford et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Plaisant, Catherine, Druin, Allison, Lathan, Corinna, Dakhane, Kapil, Edwards, Kris, Vice, Jack Maxwell and Montemayor, Jaime (2000): A Storytelling Robot for Pediatric Rehabilitation. In: Fourth Annual ACM Conference on Assistive Technologies 2000. pp. 50-55. Available online

We are developing a prototype storytelling robot for use with children in rehabilitation. Children can remotely control a large furry robot by using a variety of body sensors adapted to their disability or rehabilitation goal. In doing so, they can teach the robot to act out series of movements or "emotions" and then write stories -- using a storytelling software -- including those movements in the story. The story can then be "played" by the remote controlled robot, which acts out the story. We believe that this robot can motivate the children and help them reach their therapy goals through therapeutic play, either by exercising muscles or joints (e.g. for physically challenges children) or by reflecting on the stories (e.g. for children with developmental disabilities). We use an innovative design methodology involving children as design partners.

© All rights reserved Plaisant et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Alborzi, Houman, Druin, Allison, Montemayor, Jaime, Platner, Michele, Porteous, Jessica, Sherman, Lisa, Boltman, Angela, Taxen, Gustav, Best, Jack, Hammer, Joe, Kruskal, Alex and Lal, Abby (2000): Designing StoryRooms: Interactive Storytelling Spaces for Children. In: Proceedings of DIS00: Designing Interactive Systems: Processes, Practices, Methods, & Techniques 2000. pp. 95-104. Available online

Costly props, complicated authoring technologies, and limited access to space are among the many reasons why children can rarely enjoy the experience of authoring room-sized interactive stories. Typically in these kinds of environments, children are restricted to being story participants, rather than story authors. Therefore, we have begun the development of StoryRooms, room-sized immersive storytelling current technology implementation and example StoryRooms.

© All rights reserved Alborzi et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison and Hendler, James (eds.) (2000): Robots for Kids: Exploring New Technologies for Learning. Morgan Kaufmann Publishers

 
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Druin, Allison (2000): Children Shaping the Future of Digital Libraries. In First Monday, 5 (6) . Available online

1999
 
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Stewart, Jason, Bederson, Benjamin B. and Druin, Allison (1999): Single Display Groupware: A Model for Co-Present Collaboration. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 286-293. Available online

We introduce a model for supporting collaborative work between people that are physically close to each other. We call this model Single Display Groupware (SDG). In this paper, we describe the model, comparing it to more traditional remote collaboration. We describe the requirements that SDG places on computer technology, and our understanding of the benefits and costs of SDG systems. Finally, we describe a prototype SDG system that we built and the results of a usability test we ran with 60 elementary school children.

© All rights reserved Stewart et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison, Montemayor, Jaime, Handler, Jim, McAlister, Britt, Boltman, Angela, Fiterman, Eric, Plaisant, Aurelie, Kruskal, Alex and Olsen, Hanne (1999): Designing PETS: A Personal Electronic Teller of Stories. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 326-329. Available online

We have begun the development of a new robotic pet that can support children in the storytelling process. Children can build their own pet by snapping together the modular animal parts of the PETS robot. After their pet is built, children can tell stories using the My Pets software. These stories can then be acted out by their robotic pet. This video paper describes the motivation for this research and the design process of our intergenerational design team in building the first PETS prototypes. We will discuss our progress to date and our focus for the future.

© All rights reserved Druin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison (1999): Cooperative Inquiry: Developing New Technologies for Children with Children. In: Altom, Mark W. and Williams, Marian G. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 99 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference May 15-20, 1999, Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania. pp. 592-599. Available online

In today's homes and schools, children are emerging as frequent and experienced users of technology [3, 14]. As this trend continues, it becomes increasingly important to ask if we are fulfilling the technology needs of our children. To answer this question, I have developed a research approach that enables young children to have a voice throughout the technology development process. In this paper, the techniques of cooperative inquiry will be described along with a theoretical framework that situates this work in the HCI literature. Two examples of technology resulting from this approach will be presented, along with a brief discussion on the design-centered learning of team researchers using cooperative inquiry.

© All rights reserved Druin and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison, Kruskal, Alex, Olsen, Hanne, Revett, Isabella, Schwenn, Thomas Plaisant, Sumida, Lauren and Wagner, Rebecca (1999): Designers of the Future. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 31 (1) pp. 13-14. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison (1999): Where is the Industry Going. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 31 (2) pp. 12-13. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison and Simsarian, Kristian (1999): What Happens when There is Research Funding for New Technologies for Children?. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 31 (3) pp. 12-14. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison (1999): Four Years of CHIkids from a CHIkid!. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 31 (4) pp. 11-12. Available online

1998
 
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Boltman, Angela and Druin, Allison (1998): The Ingredients of CHIkids: Education, Technology, and Fun Outside the Classroom. In Interactions, 5 (6) p. 30. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison (1998): My Kid Doesn't Need a Computer. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (1) pp. 15-16. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison (1998): How Did You Get To Doing What You Do?. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (3) pp. 20-22. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison (1998): A Look Back and a Look Forward. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (4) pp. 6-8. Available online

 
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Koenemann, Jurgen, Druin, Allison and Boltman, Angela (1998): HCI in the Classroom: The CHI'98 Development Consortium. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (4) p. 59. Available online

Each year the CHI conference reaches out to new communities that have an interest in learning more about CHI and that can teach CHI more about them. The Development Consortium (DC) at CHI 98 brought together selected educators from five countries that shared their views on HCI issues in educational settings. This year, DC participants attended a pre-conference workshop, took part in the CHIkids tutorial and CHIkids program, participated in regular CHI conference activities, and reflected on their experiences in a final session.

© All rights reserved Koenemann et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Mack, Robert L., Druin, Allison, Riederman, David, Scholtz, Jean and Wharton, Cathleen (1998): SIGCHI Needs You! A Call for Volunteers. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 30 (4) pp. 94-95. Available online

Volunteers are the lifeblood of SIGCHI: ACM's Special Interest Group on Computer-Human Interaction. SIGCHI is governed by an all-volunteer, elected Executive Committee which oversees conference activities, finances, publications and general operations. Volunteers organize annual CHI conferences, review papers, and organize conference venues like Panels and Workshop. Volunteers have built and maintained SIGCHI's electronic infrastructure, including Web site, e-mail lists, and databases for organizing technical programs and services for its membership, and the world-wide HCI community. As SIGCHI grows, it retains the services of professional services for its operations which permits the volunteer community to concentrate on advancing the profession. But in the end everything SIGCHI accomplishes is the direct result of volunteer input. And SIGCHI needs more of you.

© All rights reserved Mack et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison (ed.) (1998): The Design of Children's Technology; How We Design, What We Design and Why. Morgan Kaufmann Publishers

1997
 
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Druin, Allison (1997): The CHI97 CHIkids Program: A Partnership between Kids, Adults and Technology. In Interactions, 4 (5) pp. 48-59. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison, Stewart, Jason, Proft, David, Bederson, Benjamin B. and Hollan, James D. (1997): KidPad: A Design Collaboration Between Children, Technologists, and Educators. In: Pemberton, Steven (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 97 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 22-27, 1997, Atlanta, Georgia. pp. 463-470. Available online

We established an interdisciplinary, intergenerational collaboration in the fall of 1995, between the University of New Mexico's Computer Science Department, the College of Education, and local Albuquerque elementary school children. The goal of this research was to develop an expressive digital medium with an intuitive zooming interface, to support a learning environment for children. In the process of this collaboration, design methodologies that support a child's role in the development of new technologies were explored. What follows is a summary of our iterative design experience, collaboration, and the results of the research to date.

© All rights reserved Druin et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison (1997): Children, Creativity and Computers. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (1) p. 13. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison (1997): Why Do We Make Technology for Kids?. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (2) pp. 18-19. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison (1997): Kids Are Not "Adults-In-Waiting". In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (3) pp. 18-19. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison (1997): Reflection on CHIkids.... In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 29 (4) pp. 16-17. Available online

1996
 
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Druin, Allison (1996): A Place Called Childhood. In Interactions, 3 (1) pp. 17-22. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison (1996): CHIkid Voices: It's Too Bad They Don't Let You be a Kid!. In Interactions, 3 (5) pp. 10-20. Available online

 
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Druin, Allison and Solomon, Cynthia (1996): Designing Multimedia Environments for Children. John Wiley and Sons

 
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Druin, Allison (1996): CHIKids: A Common Ground for Kids and Adults. In: Tauber, Michael J., Bellotti, Victoria, Jeffries, Robin, Mackinlay, Jock D. and Nielsen, Jakob (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 96 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 14-18, 1996, Vancouver, Canada. pp. 506-507.

CHIkids challenges the traditional notion of childcare and rolls summer camp, technology, and CHI into a new hands-on experience for children. This is an opportunity for the next generation to explore computers, technology, and user interface design at the CHI 96 conference. Children (3-12 years of age) will have the opportunity to create multimedia stories, try the latest educational multimedia titles, test emerging software technologies with CHI researchers, and to be conference reporters using desktop publishing tools and the World Wide Web. These activities will be reported on and presented by CHIkids leaders at the close of the CHI 96 conference.

© All rights reserved Druin and/or ACM Press

 
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Bederson, Benjamin B., Hollan, James D., Druin, Allison, Stewart, Jason, Rogers, David and Proft, David (1996): Local Tools: An Alternative to Tool Palettes. In: Kurlander, David, Brown, Marc and Rao, Ramana (eds.) Proceedings of the 9th annual ACM symposium on User interface software and technology November 06 - 08, 1996, Seattle, Washington, United States. pp. 169-170. Available online

We describe local tools, a general interaction technique that replaces traditional tool palettes. A collection of tools sit on the worksurface along with the data. Each tool can be picked up (where it replaces the cursor), used, and then put down anywhere on the worksurface. There is a toolbox for organizing the tools. These local tools were implemented in Pad++ as part of KidPad, an application for children.

© All rights reserved Bederson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Druin, Allison (1996): What I Learned at CHIkids. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 28 (4) pp. 57-60. Available online

1989
 
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Minsky, Margaret, Brooks, Fred, Behensky, Max, Milliken, Doug, Russo, Massimo and Druin, Allison (1989): Recent Progress Creating Environments with the Sense of Feel: Giving "Look and Feel. In: Bice, Ken and Lewis, Clayton H. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 89 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 30 - June 4, 1989, Austin, Texas. pp. 189-190.

Several projects have made progress recently in integrating force feedback and the use of touch sensation into computing-based environments. These projects partake of the spirit of creating virtual worlds, fantasy or simulation environments that combine the emotional power of touch interfaces with the computational power of abstraction.

© All rights reserved Minsky et al. and/or ACM Press

1988
 
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Druin, Allison (1988): Noobie: The Animal Design Playstation. In ACM SIGCHI Bulletin, 20 (1) pp. 45-53.

For a year and a half, I lead a group of researchers in building an alternative to the traditional computer terminal. Instead of building a design workstation complete with keyboard and mouse, we built an animal design playstation complete with fur, feathers, and an irridescent fish tail. We used the tools of puppetry, animation, and computer electronics, to build what is now called Noobie (short for "New Beast"). By sitting or standing in the lap of this computer creature, a child can build fantasy or real animals. When one squeezes a part on Noobie, the selected animal part can be seen on the screen in Noobie's stomach, and a sound can be heard. This paper documents the ideas behind the conception and creation of Noobie, along with how it fits into the short history of the Vivarium research group. This group is a collection of people, ideas, and projects that focus on creating a multi-media environment for children to learn about animal behavior.

© All rights reserved Druin and/or ACM Press

 
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