Publication statistics

Pub. period:1997-2013
Pub. count:48
Number of co-authors:20



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

Tom Rodden:2
Steve Gill:2
Russell Beale:2

 

 

Productive colleagues

Alan Dix's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Gregory D. Abowd:116
Tom Rodden:106
Ryen W. White:59
 
 
 

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Alan Dix

Professor

Picture of Alan Dix.
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Personal Homepage:
http://www.alandix.com/

Current place of employment:
University of Birmingham

Alan Dix has taught and researched in human-computer interaction (HCI) for nearly 30 years and he is the author of one of the most widely used textbooks on the subject used across the world. His interests in the area range from the application of formal techniques in interface design to methods for enhancing innovation and creativity. He began as a mathematician at Cambridge University and moved into computing and HCI whilst doing his PhD at the University of York. His background also includes work on farm crop sprayers and remote controlled submarines. He was a founder director of two Internet dot.com companies.

 

Publications by Alan Dix (bibliography)

 what's this?
2013
 
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Dix, Alan (2013). HCI Course Exercise: How many computers?. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e3/online/how-many-computers/

How many computers do you have in your home? Did you answer two or three, perhaps a laptop, desktop and maybe an iPad? Or maybe you are a bit of a geek and had more: several desktop computers, games machines, multiple laptops of various ages? maybe even some retro home computers from the 1980s? However, do you have a television, HiFi, microwave oven, washing machines, central heating controller? Each of these has one or more computers within it - literally computers are all around you.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). HCI Course Lesson 1.4 Slides. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.slideshare.net/hcicourse/introducing-human-computer-interaction

HCI Course Slides for Lesson 1.4.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Artefact Marketing = Product. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.hiraeth.com/alan/ebulletin/product-and-market/product-and-market.html

This short article talks more about the way words spoken whether in marketing or documentation can change the user's perception of an artefact and hence the kind of product it is to them.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Tiree Mobile Archive. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://whereweare.org/tiree/rel1/

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Cultural Probes: Case study. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e3/casestudy/cultural-probes/

Short online article on cultural probes.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Mode - Human-Computer Interaction. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e4/glossary/mode/

Definition of the term 'Mode'.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Online! Menu breadth and Miller's 7 +/- 2. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e3/online/menu-breadth/

Short online article explaining why Miller's 7+/-2 for working memory does not apply to menu breadth ... and why shallow broad menus with lots of options may well be better.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Changing rules of copyright on the web - The NLA Case. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://alandix.com/blog/2011/12/26/changing-rules-of-copyright-on-the-web-the-nla-case/

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Online! As others see - Colour Blindness. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e3/online/colour-blindness/

 
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Dix, Alan and Gill, Steve (2013). TouchIT - Interacting with Physical Objects. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.physicality.org/TouchIT/touchit-draft/objects-things/interacting-with-physical-objects/

Online chapter about interacting with physical things. It starts with an in depth look at affordance and related issues.

© All rights reserved Dix and Gill and/or their publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Case study Gmail - Colours in a mess. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e3/casestudy/gmail-colours/

How not to use colour in graphical displays.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Interaction Design (HCI Course Slides). Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.slideshare.net/hcicourse/interaction-design-15313769

Human-computer Interaction course slides for Interaction Design: Lesson 2.7.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Online! Cybernetic Understanding of Fitts' Law. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e3/online/fitts-cybernetic/

Description of Fitts' Law as a cybernetic control system.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). The Human: Perception and Cognition (HCI Course Lesson 3.8 slides). Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.slideshare.net/hcicourse/the-human-perception-overview

Human-computer Interaction course lesson 3.8 slides providing a brief overview of Perception and Cognition.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). The Human: Eye and Vision (Human-computer Interaction course slides). Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.slideshare.net/hcicourse/the-human-eye-and-vision

The Human: Eye and Vision slides for Lesson 3.7 of HCI course.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). The Human: Sound and Vision (HCI Course Lesson 3.8 slides). Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.slideshare.net/hcicourse/the-human-sound-and-hearing

Human-computer interaction course lesson 3.8 slides.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). The Human: Memory. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.slideshare.net/hcicourse/the-human-memory

Human-computer interaction course slides for Lesson 3.8

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Ego, Emotion and Experience. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e4/chapters/emotion/

Whilst older images of computation have typically been clinical and emotionless, increasingly computer systems are part of leisure activities, home life and fun. There is a long history of computer games, but increasingly artwork is also incorporating digital elements and of course consumer products such as the iPod not only perform functions, but also enchant and captivate their users. Emotion is a basic part of our make-up as humans, not an optional extra, but an essential part of who we are. So our designs for computer systems and digital products need to take account of the joys, fears, excitement, trust and insecurities, not just our speed of typing.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Some lessons in extended interaction, courtesy of Adobe. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://alandix.com/blog/2009/03/23/some-lessons-in-extended-interaction-courtesy-adobe/

A 'war story' of an extended interaction. In some ways short compared to some forms of extended episodic experience, and the war story is not just about the emotional aspects.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). HCI Course Lesson 4 slides. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.slideshare.net/hcicourse/emotion-15313842

Human-computer interaction course slides for Lesson 4.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Human-computer Interaction (Evolving 4th Edition). Retrieved 1 September 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e4/chapters/implementation/

In this chapter, we will discuss issues that arise during the implementation of an interactive system and the various tools and frameworks that support the programming of such systems.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). HCI4/e Exercise 6 - Implementation Human-Computer Interaction, 4e. Retrieved 1 September 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e4/chapters/implementation/#exercise-6

Exercise for Human-computer Interaction course Lesson 5.3.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Scenario: Nuclear Reactor (HCI Course Lesson 5.4. Exercise). Retrieved 1 September 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e3/plain/scenario/nuclear/

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Scenario: Nuclear Reactor - Variant 2 (HCI Course Lesson 5.4. Exercise). Retrieved 1 September 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e3/scenario/nuclear2/

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Implementation (HCI Course Lesson 5 slides). Retrieved 1 September 2013 from http://www.slideshare.net/hcicourse/implementation-15313956

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Case Study: Ambient Wood (from Human-Computer Interaction Evolving 4th Ed). Retrieved 1 September 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e3/casestudy/ambient-wood/

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Online! Are five users enough?. Retrieved 1 September 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/e3/online/are-five-users-enough/

Analysis of how many users are needed for different purposes during evaluation.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Fitts' Law data derived from www.tele-actor.net. Retrieved 1 September 2013 from http://www.hcibook.com/static/docs/fitts-data.csv

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Action Research in HCI. Retrieved 1 September 2013 from http://alandix.com/blog/2012/12/10/action-research-in-hci/

 
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Dix, Alan (2013). Evaluation (HCI Course Lesson 6 slides). Retrieved 1 September 2013 from http://www.slideshare.net/hcicourse/evaluation-15313966

2012
 
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Dix, Alan (2012): Asynchronous active values for client-side interactive service coordination. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces 2012. pp. 26-33. Available online

This paper describes Asynchronous Active Values (AAV), a framework for the production of reactive web interfaces that use API-based web service back-ends. Such interfaces are now becoming common due to API-oriented application development and more sophisticated post-Web2.0 mashups. A significant feature of such interfaces is the need for feedback when parts of the page display are in some way temporarily invalid, or in flux, while potentially slow API calls are responding to requests. AAV extends existing methods such as access-oriented programming and the observer pattern, by including a 'changing' event in addition to the normal 'onChange' to enable intermediate feedback.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or ACM Press

 
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Quigley, Aaron, Dix, Alan, Nacenta, Miguel and Rodden, Tom (2012): Workshop on Infrastructure and Design Challenges of Coupled Display Visual Interfaces: in conjunction with Advanced Visual Interfaces 2012 (AVI'12). In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces 2012. pp. 815-817. Available online

An increasing number of interactive displays of very different sizes, portability, projectability and form factors are starting to become part of the display ecosystems that we make use of in our daily lives. Displays are shaped by human activity into an ecological arrangement and thus an ecology. Each combination or ecology of displays offer substantial promise for the creation of applications that effectively take advantage of the wide range of input, affordances, and output capability of these multi-display, multi-device and multi-user environments. Although the last few years have seen an increasing amount of research in this area, knowledge about this subject remains under explored, fragmented, and cuts across a set of related but heterogeneous issues. This workshop brings together researchers and practitioners interested in the challenges posed by infrastructure and design.

© All rights reserved Quigley et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Andr, Paul, Schraefel, M. C., Dix, Alan and White, Ryen W. (2011): Expressing well-being online: towards self-reflection and social awareness. In: Proceedings of the 2011 iConference 2011. pp. 114-121. Available online

Medicine, psychology and quality of life literature all point to the importance of not just asking 'how are you?', but assessing and being aware of self and others' well-being. Social networking has been shown to have a variety of uses and benefits, but does not currently offer explicit expression of a well-being state. We developed and deployed Healthii, a social networking tool to convey well-being using a set of pre-defined discrete categories. We sought to understand how communicating this in a lightweight fashion may be used and valued. Using a hybrid methodology, over five weeks ten participants used the tool on Facebook, Twitter, or on the desktop, and in group meetings discussed the affect and effect of the tool, before a final individual survey. The trial showed that participants used and valued status expression for its support to convey state, and for self-reflection and group awareness. We discuss these findings as well as future opportunities for awareness visualization and automatic data integration.

© All rights reserved Andr et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Dix, Alan and Gongora, Layda (eds.) DESIRE 11 Procedings of the Second Conference on Creativity and Innovation in Design 2011.

2010
 
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Dix, Alan (2010). TouchIT - Body and Mind. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.physicality.org/TouchIT/touchit-draft/human-body-mind/body-and-mind/

 
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Dix, Alan (2010). Time Machine - when it goes wrong and how to fix it. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://alandix.com/blog/2010/07/09/time-machine-when-it-goes-wrong-and-how-to-fix-it/

An Apple horror story.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

 
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Khalid, Haliyana and Dix, Alan (2010): The experience of photologging: global mechanisms and local interactions. In , 14 (3) pp. 209-226.

2009
 
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Dix, Alan and Gill, Steve (2009). TouchIT - Mind. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.physicality.org/TouchIT/touchit-draft/human-body-mind/mind/

2008
 
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Katifori, Akrivi, Lepouras, George, Dix, Alan and Kamaruddin, Azrina (2008): Evaluating the Significance of the Desktop Area in Everyday Computer Use. In: Proceedings of the 2008 International Conference on Advances in Computer-Human Interactions 2008. pp. 31-38. Available online

Computers have become part of our homes and day-to-day lives. This paper presents selected results of an interview-based user study focused on information management on the personal computer. We focus on the Desktop, confirming results of previous studies as well as revealing new issues and ensuing design suggestions. While even basic competence users inventively appropriated the desktop, some features, in particular user-defined shortcuts, appeared counter-intuitive, and were underused. Users are still dissatisfied with their information organization and the challenge is to provide tools that support rather than replace the users' flexible and creative use of the current desktop.

© All rights reserved Katifori et al. and/or IEEE

 
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Dix, Alan (2008): Sinister Scrollbar in the Xerox Star Xplained. In Interfaces, . Available online

 
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Vyas, Dhaval, Chisalita, Christina M. and Dix, Alan (2008). Dynamics of Affordances and Implications for Design. University of Twente http://doc.utwente.nl/64769/

Affordance is an important concept in HCI. There are various interpretations of affordances but it has been difficult to use this concept for design purposes. Often the treatment of affordances in the current HCI literature has been as a one-to-one relationship between a user and an artefact. According to our views, affordance is a dynamic, always emerging relationship between a human and his environment. We believe that the social and cultural contexts within which an artefact is situated affect the way in which the artefact is used. Using a Structuration Theory approach, we argue that affordances need also be treated at a much broader level, encompassing social and cultural aspects. We suggest that affordances should be seen at three levels: single user, organizational (or work group) and societal. Focusing on the organizational level affordances, we provide details of several important factors that affect the emergence of affordances.

© All rights reserved Vyas et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Affordances: [/encyclopedia/affordances_and_design.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Affordances: [/encyclopedia/affordances_and_design.html]


 
2007
 
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Dix, Alan (2007). Externalisation. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://alandix.com/academic/papers/externalisation-2008/

Short article about the potential of externalisation of tacit mental processes

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

2004
 
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Dix, Alan (2004). The Brain and The Web - A quick backup in case of accidents. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://alandix.com/academic/papers/brain-and-web-2005/

2003
 
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Dix, Alan, Finlay, Janet E., Abowd, Gregory D. and Beale, Russell (2003): Human-Computer Interaction (3rd Edition). Prentice Hall

The second edition of Human-Computer Interaction established itself as one of the classic textbooks in the area, with its broad coverage and rigorous approach, this new edition builds on the existing strengths of the book, but giving the text a more student-friendly slant and improving the coverage in certain areas. The revised structure, separating out the introductory and more advanced material will make it easier to use the book on a variety of courses. This new edition now includes chapters on Interaction Design, Universal Access and Rich Interaction, as well as covering the latest developments in ubiquitous computing and Web technologies, making it the ideal text to provide a grounding in HCI theory and practice.

© All rights reserved Dix et al. and/or Prentice Hall

 
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Dix, Alan, Finlay, Janet, Abowd, Gregory D. and Beale, Russell (2003): Human-computer Interaction (3rd Ed.). In: (ed.). "". p. 86

Hermes: Case study

© All rights reserved Dix et al. and/or their publisher

2000
 
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Dix, Alan (2000). The Right Mind. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from ACM SIGCH: http://alandix.com/academic/hci-education/sigchi-bulletin/2001-jan-right-mind.html

A short article written following a conversation between Alan Dix and an Autistic student about space and screen design.

© All rights reserved Dix and/or his/her publisher

1998
 
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Rodden, Tom, Chervest, Keith, Davies, Nigel and Dix, Alan (1998). Exploiting Context in HCI Design for Mobile Systems. ACM http://www.dcs.gla.ac.uk/~johnson/papers/mobile/HCIMD1.html

In this paper author considered human computer interaction with mobile devices in terms of the development of advanced mobile applications. The maturing of technology to allow the emergence of multi-user distributed applications that exploit mobile applications means that we can no longer focus the issues of interaction on the nature of the device. Rather we must explicitly consider impact of the context in informing the design of different interaction techniques. The context needs to be considered in terms of the devices relationship with the technical infrastructure, the application domain, the socio-technical system in which it is situated, the location of its use and the physical nature of the device. The interaction style supported by this class of mobile application is as dependant on this context as the properties of the device itself. As a result, it is essential that work on the nature of these devices and the development of techniques that are aware of the limits of these devices is complemented by a broader consideration of the nature of interaction. However, these modified and novel forms of interaction cannot be realised without corresponding software architectures. So far it have been identified two major structural principles which underlie this architectural design: the importance of representing status phenomena and the need for contextual information to cut across the software design space.

© All rights reserved Rodden et al. and/or their publisher

 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
 Cited in the following chapter:

Mobile Computing: [/encyclopedia/mobile_computing.html]


 
1997
 
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Dix, Alan (1997). Interactive Stacked Histograms. Retrieved 31 August 2013 from http://www.meandeviation.com/dancing-histograms/hist.html

 
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