Publication statistics

Pub. period:1999-2012
Pub. count:40
Number of co-authors:70



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

James Scott:5
Marc A. Smith:5
Kori Inkpen:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

A. J. Bernheim Brush's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Saul Greenberg:140
Jonathan Grudin:105
Abigail Sellen:81
 
 
 

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A. J. Bernheim Brush

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"A. J. Brush"

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Publications by A. J. Bernheim Brush (bibliography)

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2012
 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Johns, Paul (2012): SpeechToast: augmenting notifications with speech input focus. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Advanced Visual Interfaces 2012. pp. 270-273.

To explore the value of speech input focus for handling notifications, we built and deployed SpeechToast, an Outlook Add-in that replaces standard email notifications with a version that includes speech input commands (e.g. "open", "delete"). Notifications shown by SpeechToast have speech input focus when the audio context surrounding the computer is favorable for speech recognition. We deployed SpeechToast to 18 current users of email notifications for 4 weeks. Overall, speech input focus appealed to some participants, while non-users indicated their willingness to have it enabled as long as it did not detract from their experience. Our research suggests that selectively enabling speech input focus could provide natural and intuitive interactions that complement other input modalities.

© All rights reserved Brush and Johns and/or ACM Press

 
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Hayashi, Eiji, Riva, Oriana, Strauss, Karin, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Schechter, Stuart (2012): Goldilocks and the two mobile devices: going beyond all-or-nothing access to a device's applications. In: Proceedings of the 2012 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2012. p. 2.

Most mobile phones and tablets support only two access control device states: locked and unlocked. We investigated how well all or-nothing device access control meets the need of users by interviewing 20 participants who had both a smartphone and tablet. We find all-or-nothing device access control to be a remarkably poor fit with users' preferences. On both phones and tablets, participants wanted roughly half their applications to be available even when their device was locked and half protected by authentication. We also solicited participants' interest in new access control mechanisms designed specifically to facilitate device sharing. Fourteen participants out of 20 preferred these controls to existing security locks alone. Finally, we gauged participants' interest in using face and voice biometrics to authenticate to their mobile phone and tablets; participants were surprisingly receptive to biometrics, given that they were also aware of security and reliability limitations.

© All rights reserved Hayashi et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Jung, Jaeyeon, Mahajan, Ratul and Scott, James (2012): HomeLab: shared infrastructure for home technology field studies. In: Proceedings of the 2012 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2012. pp. 1108-1113.

Researchers who develop new home technologies using connected devices (e.g. sensors) often want to conduct large-scale field studies in homes to evaluate their technology, but conducting such studies today is quite challenging, if not impossible. Considerable custom engineering is required to ensure hardware and software prototypes work robustly, and recruiting and managing more than a handful of households can be difficult and cost-prohibitive. To lower the barrier to developing and evaluating new technologies for the home environment, we call for the development of a shared infrastructure, called HomeLab. HomeLab consists of a large number of geographically distributed households, each running a common, flexible framework (e.g., HomeOS [4]) in which experiments are implemented. The use of a common framework enables engineering effort, along with experience and expertise, to be shared among many research groups. Recruitment of households to HomeLab can be organic: as a research group recruits (a few) households to participate in its field study, these households can be invited to join HomeLab and participate in future studies conducted by other groups. As the pool of households participating in HomeLab grows, we hope that researchers will find it easier to recruit a large number of households to participate in field studies.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or ACM Press

2011
 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Lee, Bongshin, Mahajan, Ratul, Agarwal, Sharad, Saroiu, Stefan and Dixon, Colin (2011): Home automation in the wild: challenges and opportunities. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2011 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2011. pp. 2115-2124.

Visions of smart homes have long caught the attention of researchers and considerable effort has been put toward enabling home automation. However, these technologies have not been widely adopted despite being available for over three decades. To gain insight into this state of affairs, we conducted semi-structured home visits to 14 households with home automation. The long term experience, both positive and negative, of the households we interviewed illustrates four barriers that need to be addressed before home automation becomes amenable to broader adoption. These barriers are high cost of ownership, inflexibility, poor manageability, and difficulty achieving security. Our findings also provide several directions for further research, which include eliminating the need for structural changes for installing home automation, providing users with simple security primitives that they can confidently configure, and enabling composition of home devices.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Teevan, Jaime, Karlson, Amy, Amini, Shahriyar, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Krumm, John (2011): Understanding the importance of location, time, and people in mobile local search behavior. In: Proceedings of 13th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2011. pp. 77-80.

People often search for local information (e.g., a restaurant, store, gas station, or attraction) from their mobile device. We show, via a survey of 929 mobile searchers at a large software company, that local searches tend to be highly contextual, influenced by geographic features, temporal aspects, and the searcher's social context. While location was reported to be very important, respondents looked for information about places close to their current location only 40% of the time. Instead, they were often in transit (68% of our searchers) and wanted information related to their destination (27% of searchers), en route to their destination (12%), or near their destination (12%). Additionally, 63% of our participants' mobile local searches took place within a social context and were discussed with someone else. We discuss these findings to present a picture of how location, time, and social context impact mobile local searches.

© All rights reserved Teevan et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Scott, James, Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Krumm, John, Meyers, Brian, Hazas, Michael, Hodges, Stephen and Villar, Nicolas (2011): PreHeat: controlling home heating using occupancy prediction. In: Proceedings of the 2011 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2011. pp. 281-290.

Home heating is a major factor in worldwide energy use. Our system, PreHeat, aims to more efficiently heat homes by using occupancy sensing and occupancy prediction to automatically control home heating. We deployed PreHeat in five homes, three in the US and two in the UK. In UK homes, we controlled heating on a per-room basis to enable further energy savings. We compared PreHeat's prediction algorithm with a static program over an average 61 days per house, alternating days between these conditions, and measuring actual gas consumption and occupancy. In UK homes PreHeat both saved gas and reduced MissTime (the time that the house was occupied but not warm). In US homes, PreHeat decreased MissTime by a factor of 6-12, while consuming a similar amount of gas. In summary, PreHeat enables more efficient heating while removing the need for users to program thermostat schedules.

© All rights reserved Scott et al. and/or ACM Press

2010
 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Karlson, Amy K., Scott, James, Sarin, Raman, Jacobs, Andy, Bond, Barry, Murillo, Oscar, Hunt, Galen, Sinclair, Mike, Hammil, Kerry and Levi, Steven (2010): User experiences with activity-based navigation on mobile devices. In: Proceedings of 12th Conference on Human-computer interaction with mobile devices and services 2010. pp. 73-82.

We introduce activity-based navigation, which uses human activities derived from sensor data to help people navigate, in particular to retrace a "trail" previously taken by that person or another person. Such trails may include step counts, walking up/down stairs or taking elevators, compass directions, and photos taken along a user's path, in addition to absolute positioning (GPS and maps) when available. To explore the user experience of activity-based navigation, we built Greenfield, a mobile device interface for finding a car. We conducted a ten participant user study comparing users' ability to find cars across three different presentations of activity-based information as well as verbal instructions. Our results show that activity-based navigation can be used for car finding and suggest its promise more generally for supporting navigation tasks. We present lessons for future activity-based navigation interfaces, and motivate further work in this space, particularly in the area of robust activity inference.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Krumm, John and Scott, James (2010): Exploring end user preferences for location obfuscation, location-based services, and the value of location. In: Proceedings of the 2010 International Conference on Uniquitous Computing 2010. pp. 95-104.

Long-term personal GPS data is useful for many UbiComp services such as traffic monitoring and environmental impact assessment. However, inference attacks on such traces can reveal private information including home addresses and schedules. We asked 32 participants from 12 households to collect 2 months of GPS data, and showed it to them in visualizations. We explored if they understood how their individual privacy concerns mapped onto 5 location obfuscation schemes (which they largely did), which obfuscation schemes they were most comfortable with (Mixing, Deleting data near home, and Randomizing), how they monetarily valued their location data, and if they consented to share their data publicly. 21/32 gave consent to publish their data, though most households' members shared at different levels, which indicates a lack of awareness of privacy interrelationships. Grounded in real decisions about real data, our findings highlight the potential for end-user involvement in obfuscation of their own location data.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Gunaratne, Junius A. and Brush, A. J. Bernheim (2010): Newport: enabling sharing during mobile calls. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 343-352.

Newport is a collaborative application for sharing context (e.g. location) and content (e.g. photos and notes) during mobile phone calls. People can share during a phone call and sharing ends when the call ends. Newport also supports using a computer during a call to make it easier to share content from the phone or launch screen sharing if the caller is also at a computer. We describe Newport's system design and a formative evaluation with 12 participants to study their experience using Newport to share location, receive directions, share photos, and perform desktop sharing. Participants preferred using Newport to current methods for these tasks. They also preferred limiting sharing location to phone calls compared with publishing it continuously. Tying sharing to a phone call gives individuals a social sense of security, providing a mechanism for exchanging information with unknown people.

© All rights reserved Gunaratne and Brush and/or their publisher

 
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Yarosh, Svetlana, Inkpen, Kori and Brush, A. J. Bernheim (2010): Video playdate: toward free play across distance. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2010 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2010. pp. 1251-1260.

We present an empirical investigation of video-mediated free play between 13 pairs of friends (ages 7 and 8). The pairs spent 10 minutes playing with each of four different prototypes we developed to support free play over videoconferencing. We coded each interaction for the types of play and the amount of social play observed. The children in our study were largely successful in playing together across videoconferencing, though challenges in managing visibility, attention, and intersubjectivity made it more difficult than face-to-face play. We also found that our prototypes supported some types of play to varying degrees. Our contribution lies in identifying these design tradeoffs and providing directions for future design of video-mediated communication systems for children.

© All rights reserved Yarosh et al. and/or their publisher

 
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Cao, Xiang, Sellen, Abigail, Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Kirk, David, Edge, Darren and Ding, Xianghua (2010): Understanding family communication across time zones. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW10 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2010. pp. 155-158.

Nowadays it has become increasingly common for family members to be distributed in different time zones. These time differences pose specific challenges for communication within the family and result in different communication practices to cope with them. To gain an understanding of current challenges and practices, we interviewed people who regularly communicate with immediate family members living in other time zones. We report primary findings from the interviews, and identify design opportunities for improving the experience of cross time zone family communication.

© All rights reserved Cao et al. and/or their publisher

2009
 
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Chetty, Marshini, Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Meyers, Brian R. and Johns, Paul (2009): It's not easy being green: understanding home computer power management. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1033-1042.

Although domestic computer use is increasing, most efforts to reduce energy use through improved power management have focused on computers in the workplace. We studied 20 households to understand how people use power management strategies on their home computers. We saw computers in the home, particularly desktop computers, are left on much more than they are actively used suggesting opportunities for economic and energy savings. However, for most of our participants, the economic incentives were too minor to motivate them to turn off devices when not in use, especially given other frustrations such as long boot up times. We suggest research directions for home computer power management that could help users be more green without having to dramatically change their home computing habits.

© All rights reserved Chetty et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Karlson, Amy K., Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Schechter, Stuart (2009): Can i borrow your phone?: understanding concerns when sharing mobile phones. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 1647-1650.

Mobile phones are becoming increasingly personalized in terms of the data they store and the types of services they provide. At the same time, field studies have reported that there are a variety of situations in which it is natural for people to share their phones with others. However, most mobile phones support a binary security model that offers all-or-nothing access to the phone. We interviewed 12 smartphone users to explore how security and data privacy concerns affected their willingness to share their mobile phones. The diversity of guest user categorizations and associated security constraints expressed by the participants suggests the need for a security model richer than today's binary model.

© All rights reserved Karlson et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Meyers, Brian R., Scott, James and Venolia, Gina (2009): Exploring awareness needs and information display preferences between coworkers. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2009 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2009. pp. 2091-2094.

Technology makes it possible to share many different types of information with coworkers. We conducted a large-scale survey (N=549) to better understand current sharing among coworkers, how people stay aware of collocated and remote coworkers, and whether their willingness to share different types of awareness information changes based on the location in which the information is displayed. Contrary to our expectations, the display location did not greatly affect what respondents were willing to share. Our results also suggest considerations for researchers building situated displays, as respondents had concerns about unintended viewers and encouraging people to visit their personal space when they were not present.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Schechter, Stuart, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Egelman, Serge (2009): It's no secret: measuring the security and reliability of authentication via 'secret' questions. In: Proceedings of the 2009 Symposium on Usable Privacy and Security 2009. p. 40.

 
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Tee, Kimberly, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Inkpen, Kori (2009): Exploring communication and sharing between extended families. In International Journal of Human-Computer Studies, 67 (2) pp. 128-138.

In recent years, computer and Internet technologies have broadened the ways that people can stay in touch. Through interviews with parents and grandparents, we examined how people use existing technologies to communicate and share with their extended family. While most of our participants expressed a desire for more communication and sharing with their extended family, many felt that an increase would realistically be difficult to achieve due to challenges such as busy schedules or extended family members' lack of technology use. Our results also highlight the complexity of factors that researchers and designers must understand when attempting to design technology to support and enhance relationships, including trade-offs between facilitating interaction while minimizing new obligations, reducing effort without trivializing communication, and balancing awareness with privacy.

© All rights reserved Tee et al. and/or Academic Press

 
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Neustaedter, Carman, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Greenberg, Saul (2009): The calendar is crucial: Coordination and awareness through the family calendar. In ACM Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction, 16 (1) p. 6.

Everyday family life involves a myriad of mundane activities that need to be planned and coordinated. We describe findings from studies of 44 different families' calendaring routines to understand how to best design technology to support them. We outline how a typology of calendars containing family activities is used by three different types of families -- monocentric, pericentric, and polycentric -- which vary in the level of family involvement in the calendaring process. We describe these family types, the content of family calendars, the ways in which they are extended through annotations and augmentations, and the implications from these findings for design.

© All rights reserved Neustaedter et al. and/or ACM Press

2008
 
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Grimes, Andrea and Brush, A. J. Bernheim (2008): Life scheduling to support multiple social roles. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 821-824.

We present the results of our study of 15 working parents, and how they manage their life scheduling needs, that is, how they manage their personal and professional schedules across settings and calendaring tools. In particular, we discuss how their dual roles of parent and employee compel them to record personal information on their professional calendars and we detail the tensions that arise in doing so. Finally, we present suggestions for future calendaring applications that better support working parents in managing their life scheduling needs.

© All rights reserved Grimes and Brush and/or ACM Press

 
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Morris, Dan, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Meyers, Brian R. (2008): SuperBreak: using interactivity to enhance ergonomic typing breaks. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2008 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems April 5-10, 2008. pp. 1817-1826.

Repetitive strain injuries and ergonomics concerns have become increasingly significant health issues as a growing number of individuals frequently use computers for long periods of time. Currently, limited software mechanisms exist for managing ergonomics; the most well-known are "break-reminder" packages that schedule and recommend typing breaks. Yet despite the proven benefits of taking breaks, such packages are rarely adopted due to the over-head of introducing periodic interruptions into a user's workflow. In this paper, we describe SuperBreak, a break-reminder package that provides hands-free interactions during breaks, with the goal of encouraging users to take more breaks and enhancing the benefits of those breaks. In a field study of 26 knowledge workers, 85% preferred SuperBreak over a traditional break-reminder system, and on average participants took a higher percentage of the interactive breaks suggested to them. Our results highlight the value of interactivity for improving the adoption and retention of ergonomic break practices.

© All rights reserved Morris et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Inkpen, Kori and Tee, Kimberly (2008): SPARCS: exploring sharing suggestions to enhance family connectedness. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 629-638.

Staying in touch with extended family members can be a challenge in part because of the time and effort required, even with the help of current technologies. To explore the value of sharing suggestions in sparking communication and facilitating sharing between extended families, we iteratively built SPARCS, a prototype that encourages frequent sharing of photos and calendar information between extended families. Results from a five-week field study with 7 pairs of families highlight a number of important features for an ideal sharing system to help families stay connected, including asynchronous chat and easily configurable sharing suggestions.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Egelman, Serge, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Inkpen, Kori (2008): Family accounts: a new paradigm for user accounts within the home environment. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW08 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2008. pp. 669-678.

In this paper we present Family Accounts, a new user account model for shared home computers. We conducted a study with sixteen families, eight who used individual profiles at home, and eight who shared a single profile. Our results demonstrate that Family Accounts is a good compromise between a single shared profile and individual profiles for each family member. In particular, we observed that because Family Accounts allowed individuals to switch profiles without forcing them to interrupt their tasks, family members tended to switch to their own profiles only when a task required some degree of privacy or personalization.

© All rights reserved Egelman et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Meyers, Brian (2008): A field study of knowledge workers' use of interactive horizontal displays. In: Third IEEE International Workshop on Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces Tabletop 2008 October 1-3, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 105-112.

 
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Everitt, Katherine, Morris, Meredith Ringel, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Wilson, Andrew D. (2008): DocuDesk: An interactive surface for creating and rehydrating many-to-many linkages among paper and digital documents. In: Third IEEE International Workshop on Tabletops and Interactive Surfaces Tabletop 2008 October 1-3, 2008, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. pp. 25-28.

2007
 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Meyers, Brian R., Tan, Desney S. and Czerwinski, Mary (2007): Understanding memory triggers for task tracking. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2007 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2007. pp. 947-950.

Software can now track which computer applications and documents you use. This provides us with the potential to help end-users recall past activities for tasks such as status reporting. We describe findings from field observations of eight participants writing their status reports. We observed interesting trends, including the reliance on memory triggers, which were either retrieved from explicit self-reminders, from implicit breadcrumbs left while performing their tasks or directly from memory. Participants perceived spending relatively short amounts of time composing their status reports, suggesting that any technology solution must offer dramatic improvements over current practice.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Neustaedter, Carman, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Greenberg, Saul (2007): A digital family calendar in the home: lessons from field trials of LINC. In: Proceedings of the 2007 Conference on Graphics Interface 2007. pp. 199-206.

Digital family calendars have the potential to help families coordinate, yet they must be designed to easily fit within existing routines or they will simply not be used. To understand the critical factors affecting digital family calendar design, we extended LINC, an inkable family calendar to include ubiquitous access, and then conducted a month-long field study with four families. Adoption and use of LINC during the study demonstrated that LINC successfully supported the families' existing calendaring routines without disrupting existing successful social practices. Families also valued the additional features enabled by LINC. For example, several primary schedulers felt that ubiquitous access positively increased involvement by additional family members in the calendaring routine. The field trials also revealed some unexpected findings, including the importance of mobility -- both within and outside the home -- for the Tablet PC running LINC.

© All rights reserved Neustaedter et al. and/or Canadian Information Processing Society

 
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Morris, Meredith Ringel, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Meyers, Brian (2007): Reading Revisited: Evaluating the Usability of Digital Display Surfaces for Active Reading Tasks. In: Second IEEE International Workshop on Horizontal Interactive Human-Computer Systems Tabletop 2007 October 10-12, 2007, Newport, Rhode Island, USA. pp. 79-86.

 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Inkpen, Kori (2007): Yours, Mine and Ours? Sharing and Use of Technology in Domestic Environments. In: Krumm, John, Abowd, Gregory D., Seneviratne, Aruna and Strang, Thomas (eds.) UbiComp 2007 Ubiquitous Computing - 9th International Conference September 16-19, 2007, Innsbruck, Austria. pp. 109-126.

 
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Fisher, Danyel, Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Hogan, Bernie, Smith, Marc A. and Jacobs, Andy (2007): Using Social Metadata in Email Triage: Lessons from the Field. In: Smith, Michael J. and Salvendy, Gavriel (eds.) Symposium on Human Interface 2007 - Part II July 22-27, 2007, Beijing, China. pp. 13-22.

2006
 
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Neustaedter, Carman and Brush, A. J. Bernheim (2006): "LINC-ing" the family: the participatory design of an inkable family calendar. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2006 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2006. pp. 141-150.

Families must continually organize, plan, and stay aware of the activities of their households in order to coordinate everyday life. Despite having organization schemes, many people still feel overwhelmed when it comes to family coordination. To help overcome this, we present our research efforts on LINC: an inkable family calendar designed for the kitchen. LINC was developed using a participatory design process involving interviews, paper prototyping, and a formative evaluation. Our work outlines key implications for digital family calendars and family coordination systems in general. We found that coordination is not typically done through the family calendar; rather, the family calendar is a tool that provides family members with an awareness of activities and changes that in turn enables coordination. Thus, digital family calendars should provide tools that enable families to use their own coordination routines which leverage the social affordances prominent in existing paper calendars.

© All rights reserved Neustaedter and Brush and/or ACM Press

 
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Fisher, Danyel, Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Gleave, Eric and Smith, Marc A. (2006): Revisiting Whittaker & Sidner's "email overload" ten years later. In: Proceedings of ACM CSCW06 Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work 2006. pp. 309-312.

Ten years ago, Whittaker and Sidner [8] published research on email overload, coining a term that would drive a research area that continues today. We examine a sample of 600 mailboxes collected at a high-tech company to compare how users organize their email now to 1996. While inboxes are roughly the same size as in 1996, our population's email archives have grown tenfold. We see little evidence of distinct strategies for handling email; most of our users fall into a middle ground. There remains a need for future innovations to help people manage growing archives of email and large inboxes.

© All rights reserved Fisher et al. and/or ACM Press

2005
 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Turner, Tammara Combs (2005): A survey of personal and household scheduling. In: GROUP05: International Conference on Supporting Group Work November 6-9, 2005, Sanibel Island, Florida, USA. pp. 330-331.

We describe results from a survey of employees at Microsoft about how they manage personal and household scheduling. We saw a much greater use of digital calendars than we expected. Of our 621 respondents, 51% (317) used their digital calendar at work as the calendar where most of their personal and household events were recorded, while 38% (233) of respondents primarily used paper calendars. We discuss reasons respondents gave for choosing a particular type of calendar as well as challenges faced by respondents in scheduling events for themselves and their households.

© All rights reserved Brush and Turner and/or ACM Press

 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Wang, Xiaoqing, Turner, Tammara Combs and Smith, Marc A. (2005): Assessing differential usage of usenet social accounting meta-data. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 889-898.

We describe a usage study of NetscanTech, a system that generates and publishes daily a range of social metrics across three dimensions: newsgroup, author, and thread, for a set of approximately 15,000 technical newsgroups in Usenet. We bring together three interlinked datasets: survey data, usage log data and social accounting data from Usenet participation, to triangulate the relationship between various user roles and differential usage of social metrics in NetscanTech. We found our most frequent users focused on information related to individual authors far more than any other information provided. In contrast, users that visited less frequently focused more on information related to newsgroups and viewing newsgroup metrics. Our results suggest features that designers and developers of online communities may wish to include in their interfaces to support the cultivation of different community roles.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Neustaedter, Carman, Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Smith, Marc A. (2005): Beyond "from" and "received": exploring the dynamics of email triage. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 1977-1980.

Email triage is the process of going through unhandled email and deciding what to do with it. Email triage can quickly become a serious problem for users as the amount of unhandled email grows. We investigate the problem of email triage by presenting interview and survey results that articulate user needs. The results suggest the need for email user interfaces to provide additional socially salient information in order to bring important emails to the forefront.

© All rights reserved Neustaedter et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Palen, Leysia, Swan, Laurel and Taylor, Alex S. (2005): Designs for home life. In: Proceedings of ACM CHI 2005 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 2005. pp. 2035-2036.

In this Special Interest Group (SIG) we intend to consider the increasingly popular area of interactive systems design for the home. Aiming to incorporate a wide range of perspectives, the SIG's participants will map out the growing number of research and development programs in the area. Particular emphasis will be given to how home life has been characterized in various programmatic visions and how the CHI community might best capitalize on these characterizations. The importance of an understanding of home life to inform design and future directions in this area will also be reflected on. This SIG is intended to appeal to a broad cross section of the CHI community, ranging from practitioners and developers to computer and social scientists.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or ACM Press

 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Turner, Tammara Combs, Smith, Marc A. and Gupta, Neeti (2005): Scanning Objects in the Wild: Assessing an Object Triggered Information System. In: Beigl, Michael, Intille, Stephen S., Rekimoto, Jun and Tokuda, Hideyuki (eds.) UbiComp 2005 Ubiquitous Computing - 7th International Conference September 11-14, 2005, Tokyo, Japan. pp. 305-322.

 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim and Borning, Alan (2005): 'Today' Messages: Lightweight Support for Small Group Awareness via Email. In: HICSS 2005 - 38th Hawaii International Conference on System Sciences 3-6 January, 2005, Big Island, HI, USA. .

2004
 
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Marshall, Catherine C. and Brush, A. J. Bernheim (2004): Exploring the relationship between personal and public annotations. In: JCDL04: Proceedings of the 4th ACM/IEEE-CS Joint Conference on Digital Libraries 2004. pp. 349-357.

Today people typically read and annotate printed documents even if they are obtained from electronic sources like digital libraries If there is a reason for them to share these personal annotations online, they must re-enter them. Given the advent of better computer support for reading and annotation, including tablet interfaces, will people ever share their personal digital ink annotations as is, or will they make substantial changes to them? What can we do to anticipate and support the transition from personal to public annotations? To investigate these questions, we performed a study to characterize and compare students' personal annotations as they read assigned papers with those they shared with each other using an online system. By analyzing over 1, 700 annotations, we confirmed three hypotheses: (1) only a small fraction of annotations made while reading are directly related to those shared in discussion; (2) some types of annotations -- those that consist of anchors in the text coupled with margin notes -- are more apt to be the basis of public commentary than other types of annotations; and (3) personal annotations undergo dramatic changes when they are shared in discussion, both in content and in how they are anchored to the source document. We then use these findings to explore ways to support the transition from personal to public annotations.

© All rights reserved Marshall and Brush and/or ACM Press

2002
 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Bargeron, David, Grudin, Jonathan and Gupta, Anoop (2002): Notification for shared annotation of digital documents. In: Terveen, Loren (ed.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2002 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference April 20-25, 2002, Minneapolis, Minnesota. pp. 89-96.

2001
 
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Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Bargeron, David, Gupta, Anoop and Cadiz, Jonathan J. (2001): Robust Annotation Positioning in Digital Documents. In: Beaudouin-Lafon, Michel and Jacob, Robert J. K. (eds.) Proceedings of the ACM CHI 2001 Human Factors in Computing Systems Conference March 31 - April 5, 2001, Seattle, Washington, USA. pp. 285-292.

Increasingly, documents exist primarily in digital form. System designers have recently focused on making it easier to read digital documents, with annotation as an important new feature. But supporting annotation well is difficult because digital documents are frequently modified, making it challenging to correctly reposition annotations in modified versions. Few systems have addressed this issue, and even fewer have approached the problem from the users' point of view. This paper reports the results of two studies examining user expectations for robust annotation positioning in modified documents. We explore how users react to lost annotations, the relationship between types of document modifications and user expectations, and whether users pay attention to text surrounding their annotations. Our results could contribute substantially to effective digital document annotation systems.

© All rights reserved Brush et al. and/or ACM Press

1999
 
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Power, Joanna L., Brush, A. J. Bernheim, Prusinkiewicz, Przemyslaw and Salesin, David (1999): Interactive arrangement of botanical L-system models. In: SI3D 1999 1999. pp. 175-182.

 
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Page Information

Page maintainer: The Editorial Team
URL: http://www.interaction-design.org/references/authors/a__j__bernheim_brush.html

Publication statistics

Pub. period:1999-2012
Pub. count:40
Number of co-authors:70



Co-authors

Number of publications with 3 favourite co-authors:

James Scott:5
Marc A. Smith:5
Kori Inkpen:5

 

 

Productive colleagues

A. J. Bernheim Brush's 3 most productive colleagues in number of publications:

Saul Greenberg:140
Jonathan Grudin:105
Abigail Sellen:81
 
 
 

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